L204 2055-2066 STAFF
Introduction to Fiction

2055 8:00a-8:50a MWF (25) 3 cr. KUCHTA
2056 9:05a-9:55a MWF (25) 3 cr. MARZAHL
2057 12:20p-1:10p MWF (25) 3 cr. ASYA
2058 1:25p-2:15p MWF (25) 3 cr. JAFFE
2059 2:30p-03:20p MWF (25) 3 cr. JAFFE
2060 3:35p-4:25p MWF (25) 3 cr. RYAN
2061 8:00a-9:15a TR (25) 3 cr. LEVASSEUR
2062 11:15a-12:30p TR (25) 3 cr. LEVASSEUR
2063 1:00p-2:15p TR (25) 3 cr. HUNTSMAN (description follows)
2064 1:00p-2:15p TR (25) 3 cr. STANTON
2065 2:30p-3:45p TR (20) 3 cr. KREILKAMP (Honors section-- description follows)
2066 4:00p-5:15p TR (25) 3 cr. LIBBY
9885 1:00p-2:15p TR (20) 3 cr. EAKIN

COLLEGE INTENSIVE WRITING SECTIONS

Representative works of fiction; structural techniques in the novel. Novels and short stories from several ages and countries.

FOR LEVASSEUR SECTIONS 2061 AND 2062:

This course is designed to help you learn to read, enjoy, and write about fiction. We will examine the formal elements and cultural contexts of outstanding works of short fiction and several award- winning novels. Critical essays written in response to these works will also be studied. This is an intensive writing course, so we will pay particular attention to how one goes about fashioning responses into well-supported analyses and interpretations of works of fiction. Students will keep a reading journal, recording notes, key quotations, and responses to questions on the reading assignments and to reflection questions posed in class. The reading journal will provide ideas for the writing assignments. Students will also participate in one group assignment during the semester.

Texts:


FOR HUNTSMAN SECTION 2063:

The purpose of this course, designed for non-majors and carrying College intensive writing credit, is to introduce you to a variety of fictional genres, and to help you learn to write better about them (and other things). We will very explicitly look at how writers write, and why. Most of the short pieces of fiction (including work by Kafka, Faulkner, Hemingway, Updike, Mason, and Joyce) will come from a single collection, but we will also read a few novels. In addition to almost daily in-class exercises, you will write two or three longer papers which you will be asked to revise and resubmit, because only by re-writing can you learn to write better. There will also be a final examination, which will cover the content of the readings as well as the processes of reading and writing.

The reading list has not yet been finalized, but the following is a possibility: Charters, The Story and its Writer; Alvarez, How the Garcia Girls Lost their Accent; Capote, In Cold Blood; LeGuin, The Left Hand of Darkness; and Walker, The Color Purple.

FOR KREILKAMP SECTION 2065:

HONORS SECTION: OBTAIN AUTHORIZATION FROM THE HONORS COLLEGE, 324 N. JORDAN AVE.

TOPIC: FICTION AND THE REBELLIOUS SELF

How does fiction represent the individual at odds with his or her society? How do novelists make scandal, rebellion, resistance to norms, and counter-orthodoxy the material, subject, and problem of their work? What relationship do the "rules" of fiction have to the rules and laws of society? How and when does fiction seek to liberate or discipline the self? We'll ask such questions of a series of great American and European novels and novellas from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We'll develop a repertoire of formal terms, concepts, and categories for reading and analyzing works of fiction. We'll define and put to use such concepts as: point of view; first-person, third-person, and free indirect narrative; the unreliable narrator; plot as opposed to story; fictional character. We'll also consider the works' relationship to the historical contexts in which they were created, and ponder the degree to which fiction encourages readers to rethink their own relationship to social norms and orthodoxies. Likely authors include Jane Austen, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Thomas Hardy, Edith Wharton, Franz Kafka, Vladimir Nabokov, Jeannette Winterson. Assignments will include two or three formal papers, midterm test and take-home final exam, and frequent required postings to Oncourse.