Sociology | Social Theory
S340 | 4127-4128 | Steensland


THESE SECTIONS COAS INTENSIVE WRITING SECTIONS & ALSO REQUIRE
REGISTRATION IN COAS W333.

The classical sociologists of the 19th century, such as Karl Marx,
Max Weber, and Emile Durkheim, asked fundamental questions about
society and the individual: What keeps societies together? What
produces conflict? What shapes human action and decision-making? What
are the social sources of power? How and why do societies change?
They distinguished themselves from philosophers by pursuing their
answers within the context of the specific social transformations of
their period: the industrialization of work, the expansion of
capitalism, the rise of the bureaucratic organization, the growth of
modern government, and the decline of traditional religious belief as
a source of common values. This course explores the continuing
relevance of how the classical sociologists addressed these questions
during their lifetimes and how we can use their insights to better
understand the social conditions that characterize our
own era, such as globalization, postmodernity, consumerism, the
growth of "flexible work," the rise of the "information society," and
the resurgence of religion in public life.