History and Philosophy Of Science | Issues in history and philosophy of biology in the 19th and 20th centuries
X123 | 28932 | Jutta Schickore


Issues in history and philosophy of biology in the 19th and 20th
centuries

The biological sciences as we know them emerged during the past two
centuries. This course focuses on two key developments that were
momentous for this process: the formation of evolutionary theory and
the laboratory revolution. Both developments have fundamentally
transformed biological thought about life and heredity and
dramatically changed the practice of biological research. They have
shed new light on traditional philosophical debates about life,
matter, and generation and even created entirely new philosophical
questions, many of which have occupied philosophers of biology and
philosophers of science until today.

The course combines historical and philosophical perspectives on
modern biology. We trace the formation of evolutionary theory and
the rise of biological laboratories in their respective historical
contexts and discuss the epistemological, methodological, and
ethical problems that have been raised by evolutionary thinking and
the experimentalization of life in the lab.

The course will consist of lectures, readings, and discussions.
Students from a variety of backgrounds in history, philosophy, and
biology will be highly welcome.

THIS IS A 2ND 8 WEEKS COURSE