History and Philosophy Of Science | Causality
X755 | 18246 | Jordi Cat


Causality
X755
Tuesday
4:00 p.m.-6:30 p.m.

This course surveys and explores models of causal reasoning and
philosophical views about the nature of causation.  Questions about
the nature of causation include the following:  Are causes always
necessary conditions for the occurrence of their effect?   Can
causes be probabilistic?  Can causal relations be identified with
frequencies of co-occurrence?  Do causes act at a distance? Or
backwards in time?  Can we make sense of scientific representations
of the world without some notion of causation?  How can the
macroscopic world be governed by causal processes while the
microscopic world is subject to chance occurrences?  Questions about
causal reasoning include:  Why does causal knowledge matter?  How
can we best detect causes from experience?  Can we know about the
action of singular causes?  What can statistical models show?  Are
fuzzy-logical methods reliable for detecting causal relations among
non-quantifiable categories such as religious fundamentalism and
violence?