Second Language Studies | English for Intl Grad Students
T501 | 16101-16103 | --


Academic Writing (3
cr.)

This
course is designed for non-native speakers of English who need to
develop academic writing skills appropriate for the presentation of
research at the graduate level in an American university.  Students
will engage in writing exercises as well as practice procedures
essential to the production of graduate-level research, such as
selection and documentation of sources, paraphrasing, avoidance of
plagiarism, review of literature, summarizing, and formatting of
citations and bibliographies.  Practice will culminate in the
writing of a 10-15 page research paper.  Credit hours, though
counting toward full-time student status, do not count toward the
completion of a degree.

Improving Comprehensibility (2
cr.)

This is a graduate level
course designed to familiarize non-native speakers of English with
the basic features of the sound system of American English and
analyze how those sounds are produced.  In addition to
pronunciation, there will be a focus on recognizing the common
speech patterns of students and teachers in an American university
setting.  Students will engage in identifying, analyzing and
practicing patterns of stress, rhythm and intonation.  Emphasis will
be placed on self-evaluation of speech samples in order to target
areas in need of improvement.  Credit hours, though counting toward
full-time student status, do not count toward the completion of a
degree.

Academic Speaking (2
cr.)

This
course is designed to further develop fluency and speaking and
listening skills which are required for successful participation in
graduate courses.  Attention will be given to increasing students'
ability to participate in academic talk with a decrease in pause
times and an increase in the quality and quantity of connected
speech.  Students will practice negotiating meaning in group
discussions as well as give individual academic presentations.
Credit hours, though counting toward full-time student status, do
not count toward the completion of a degree.