Anthropology | Modern Jewish Society and Culture
E371 | 0464 | Bahloul


This course consists in the social scientific analysis of the Jewish
experience in modern times.  The modern Jewish society (ies) and
culture(s) will be examined in its (their) various dimensions, i.e. as an
ethnic identity, as a culture and a community, as a religious system.

Students will discuss such major topics as contemporary religious
practices and ritual, family and gender roles, the diversity of Jewish
cultures, memory and immigration, modern demography and secularization.
Under the instructor's supervision, they will carry out a research paper
or a fieldwork exercise that should give them an opportunity to have a
personal experience in Jewish ethnography, culture, and religion.

No prerequisites

Course Requirements
1.  For undergraduate students
- two mid-term examinations (25% and 30%)
- one research paper or a fieldwork exercise presented in a mock
conference, and submitted in a written form (10-15 pages, 35%),
- class attendance and participation (10%)
2.  For graduate students
- one mid-term examination (30%)
- one research paper or a fieldwork exercise presented in a mock
conference, and submitted in a written form (15 pages, 40%)
- two oral presentations (30%)

Bibliography
- Liebman, S. Ch., & Cohen, S.M., 1990, Two Worlds of Judaism:
The Israeli and American Experiences, New Haven: Yale
University Press.
- Myerhoff, B., 1978, Number Our Days, New York: Simon &
Schuster.
- Zenner, W., (ed.). 1988, Persistence and Flexibility:
Anthropological Perspectives on the American Jewish
Experience, Albany: State Univ. of New York Press.