W350 1865-1868 STAFF
Advanced Expository Writing

1865 9:05a-9:55a MWF (25) 3 cr.
1866 8:00a-9:15a TR (25) 3 cr.
1867 9:30a-10:45a TR (25) 3 cr. CARIELLO (description follows)
1868 4:00p-5:15p TR (25) 3 cr.

COAS INTENSIVE WRITING SECTIONS. PREREQUISITE: W131 OR EQUIVALENT

This advanced writing course focuses on the interconnected activities of writing and reading. It engages students through a series of writing/reading assignments in the kinds of responding, analyzing, and evaluating that are part of the work in many fields in the university. Students will work closely on a variety of texts, including their own writing, in order to develop an understanding of the assumptions, choices, and techniques that comprise the writing process.

FOR SECTION 1867 CARIELLO
9:30a-10:45a TR (25) 3 cr.

THIS SECTION OF W350 HAS BEEN DESIGNATED FOR EDUCATION MAJORS.

It fulfills the advanced writing requirements of both the School of Education and the College of Arts and Sciences. The aims of this course are threefold: first, to help Education students further develop their writing skills; second, to explore key issues in teaching and learning; and third, to provide a model of inquiry about education that prospective teachers can bring to their future work. In short, this course is designed to help Education students become reflective practitioners of their craft.

Through a sequence of writing assignments, students will be asked to analyze various viewpoints on teaching and learning with an eye toward developing arguments about current issues such as multiculturalism, bilingualism, literacy, and the ways in which race, class and gender play out in the classroom. A repeated theme in the readings for this course is that all students bring a wealth of previously acquired cultural knowledge to bear on a given learning situation; Freire would call this the larger "narrative of education" that constantly plays out in classrooms. The readings listed below explore and problematize those narratives; students will be asked to analyze them and their attendant rhetorics of education, and to contemplate how these narratives might translate into pedagogical practices in secondary education. Additionally, students will be asked to explore their own compositional strategies, life experiences, and educational backgrounds in light of the experiences of others. The end goal is to get students to consider the implications of these personal and analytic explorations for their own pedagogical concepts and classroom practices.

Texts:
Paulo Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed
Richard Rodriguez, Hunger of Memory
Ernest Gaines, A Lesson Before Dying
Anson and Schwegler, The Longman Handbook

Viewings:
Dangerous Minds,
Stand and Deliver