Communication And Culture | STUDIES IN ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION
C640 | 1136 | Andrews P


C640 provides a foundational introduction to scholarship in organizational
communication. The course introduces students to several methodological
approaches to studying organizational communication, including laboratory,
survey, and field research, along with diverse research paradigms (e.g.,
functionalist, interpretive, and rhetorical). While C640 examines
organizational communication broadly, the course is organized around the
general theme of leadership, power, and empowerment. Classic and
contemporary studies related to these constructs will be examined. Topics
to be addressed include: diverse conceptualizations of leadership (models,
styles, and functions), power and empowerment, organizational
socialization, commitment, & identification, group communication, decision
making, & team building, groupthink, and gender, power, & communication.

Among the topics to be addressed are:
diverse conceptualizations of leadership (models, styles, and
functions)

power and empowerment

organizational socialization, commitment, and identification

group communication, decision making, groupthink

gender, power, and communication

democracy in the workplace

feminist and alternative approaches to organizing

640 is conducted as a seminar, with all participants facilitating the
discussion of assigned articles and books. Lectures provide over-arching
theories and critical frameworks. Conceptual frameworks are advanced
through readings and lectures. However, much of the course is be devoted
to examining and critiquing organizational communication theory and
research. Each student will write a paper which critically engages issues
pertinent to the course, as well as preparing article abstracts, and
reading and reviewing one book.

Some of the possible works to be assigned include:

Peter G. Northouse, Leadership: Theory and Practice (Thousand Oaks, CA:
Sage Publications, 1997);
Lawrence R. Frey, ed., Group Communication in Context: Studies of Natural
Groups (Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, 1994); Irving Janis, Victims of
Groupthink, 2nd ed. (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1982); Gareth Morgan,
Images of Organization, 2nd ed. (Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications,
1997); Dennis K. Mumby, Communication and Power in Organizations:
Discourse, Ideology, and Domination (Stamford, CT: Ablex Publishing
Corporation, 1988); Rosabeth Moss Kanter, Men and Women of the Corporation
(New York: Harper & Row, 1977); Stanley Deetz, Democracy in an Age of
Corporate Colonization (Albany, NY: SUNY Press, 1992); the Winter, 1997
issue of Communication Studies on the theme of communication and
organizational democracy; and collected readings of the work of such
scholars as George Cheney, James Barker, Patrice Buzzanell, Linda Putnam,
Charles Conrad, Michael Pacanowsky, Eric Eisenberg, Randy Hirokawa,
Cynthia Stohl, Phillip Tompkins, Julia Wood, Connie Gersick, Marshall
Scott Poole, Frederic Jablin, Robin Patric Clair, and Karl Weick.