Education | Educationl Psychology
P254 | 8774 | Richard Huffer


Required Materials

1. Slaven, R. E. (2000).  Educational psychology: Theory and practice
(6th ed.).  Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon.
2. Course Packet-Available at TIS
3. 5 x 7 Note Cards

Suggested Materials

1. Three-inch Three-ring Binder
2. APA Manual (On reserve at the Education Library)
3. 5 x 7 File Box

Course Description

This course will focus on a broad range of theories and research in
educational psychology.  Subjects to be covered will include
development (e.g., Piaget, Vygotsky, Erikson, Kohlberg, etc.),
learning, motivation (e.g., behaviorism, human needs theory,
attribution theory, etc.), diversity issues (e.g., gender equity,
etc.), instructional approaches, as well as other important topics.
Lectures, group activities, and labs will help you develop a sound
theoretical foundation in educational psychology.  In addition, these
activities will give you the opportunity to practice applying what you
have learned in P254.

Course Objectives

Becoming a "good teacher" requires the development of a comprehensive
foundation of learning theories, the acquisition of teaching skills,
and the ability to apply that knowledge and those skills in the
classroom.  A teacher must be able to motivate students, manage the
classroom, assess student's prior knowledge, communicate ideas in an
effective manner, address individual differences, develop and
implement assessment procedures, review information, and make
instantaneous decisions.  Many of these skills develop as a result of
the comprehension and use of theory.  This course will endeavor to
achieve this goal of comprehension by pursuing the following
objectives:

1. Students will gain a theoretical foundation that will help them
understand the thinking and behavioral processes associated with K-12
students.
2. Students will understand, effectively communicate comprehension,
and successfully apply theories and research essential to educational
psychology.
3. Students will identify and develop knowledge and skills that are
essential to "good teaching."
4. Students will have the opportunity to practice their teaching
skills.
5. Students will develop in depth knowledge of a current educational
issue discussed in the literature.

Grading Procedures

Grade Assignment

Assignment / Total % / Points

Midterm   20   200
Final Exam   20   200
Two Writing Assignments   20   200
Two Critique Assignments  20   200
Group Presentation    20   200
Five Note Card Presentations*  0

Total % 100      1000

Grades will be assigned based on the following scale:

A+  97 and above
A   93-96.9
A-  90-92.9
B+  87-89.9
B   83-86.9
B-  80-82.9	
C+  77-79.9	
C   70-76.9
F   69.9 and below	

*Grade values are discussed under course requirements.

Personal Effort Curve (PEC):  There will be no set curve in this
course.  Rather, every student will set his or her own curve.  This
will be accomplished through extra credit work.  Every student will
have the opportunity to complete up to 150 points of extra credit.  In
other words, the curve you get graded on, depends on the effort you
put out.  This extra credit is not required; however, it is highly
recommended.  If you complete all of the extra credit, your grade will
be based on the following curve:

A+  82 and above			
A   78-81.9			
A-  75-77.9		
B+  72-74.9
B   68-71.9
B-  65-67.9
C+  62-64.9
C   55-61.9
F   54.9 and below

Course Requirements

Midterm Exam: There will be a seventy-minute midterm exam given during
the semester.  It will be an essay exam.  You will be given six
questions, and you will answer four of them.  Exams will cover all
reading assignments and all materials covered during class.

Final Exam: There will be a seventy-minute final exam given during
finals week.  It, too, will be an essay exam.  It will cover all
reading assignments and all materials covered during class, including
group presentations.  This exam will follow the same format as the
midterm.

Writing/Microteaching Assignments: There will be three writing
assignments this semester.  For each writing assignment, you will be
required to find one article (research or literature review) that is
related to a topic covered in your book or in class.  Once you have
chosen and read an article, you will write a summary of it.  That is,
you will discuss the question, hypothesis, or main idea investigated
in the article as well as the author's findings and conclusions.  You
will then write a classroom application proposal that utilizes the
knowledge you gained from your article (specific proposal requirements
are described in the grading rubric for this assignment and will be
discussed further in class).  To complete this portion of your writing
assignment, you must use an actual classroom situation you observed
during your field experience or a hypothetical situation you believe
is realistic.  In the end, this will be your opportunity to exercise
your creativity and common sense.

In addition to the writing assignment, you will be required to teach a
group of your fellow students the information contained in your paper
(each of you will be assigned to a group consisting of four to five
students).  To complete this portion of your assignment, you will need
to bring a copy of your paper and article for each member of your
group on the date the writing assignment is due.  You will also need
to turn in a copy of your paper and article to me on the same day.
Anyone who does not bring these things to class will not be allowed to
turn in their paper until they get these items.  In addition, a
1/3-grade deduction will be assessed to those students who fail to
have these items when I begin class.

Finally, the course packet contains a grading rubric that will be used
to grade each writing assignment.  You will need to use this rubric to
guide you when writing your papers.  I recommend that you bring me a
copy of your paper during my office hours (do this before the day it
is due).  I will read your paper and let you know if you are doing the
assignment correctly. AFTER PAPERS ARE GRADED, THE EXCUSE, "I
MISUNDERSTOOD THE ASSIGNMENT" WILL NOT, UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES, BE
ACCEPTED.  Finally, you will need to make a copy of this rubric and
turn it in with your paper and article.

Listed below are some suggested journals.

American Educational Research Journal - Journal of Teacher Education
Childhood Education - Phi Delta Kappen
Educational Horizons - Review of Educational Research
Educational Leadership - Roeper Review
Educational Researcher - Teaching Exceptional Children
Elementary School Journal - The Clearing House
Gifted Child Quarterly - Journal of Educational Psychology
High School Journal - Developmental Psychology
Instructor - Cognition and Instruction

Critique Assignment: There will be two critique assignments that
correspond with the two writing assignments.  The day you turn in a
writing assignment, each member of your group will give you a copy of
his or her writing assignment and article.  Your task will be to
critique each group member's classroom application proposal.  That is,
you will seek to answer a primary question: Will the author's
suggestion(s) work (at some point in your critique, you must identify
the person you are critiquing)?  No matter how you answer this
question, you will need to support your position.  To complete this
assignment, you may use any readings you have done for class.  Just
remember to properly cite everything.

To help you with this assignment, I have listed, below, some questions
you might consider.

Does the author's ideas make sense (i.e., does the author use common
sense)?

Does the author's suggestions potentially have any negative side
effects (i.e., think about the theories covered in your assigned
readings and class)?

Are the author's suggestions age appropriate?

Is the author properly applying his or her article?

Do you believe the author's classroom application ideas can be
improved in any way?  If so, how?

Is the need/problem really a need/problem?
Remember, these questions are only suggestions to get your thinking
process started.  Also, do not try to cover everything in your
critique; it is not possible.  What I will be looking for is evidence
that you have critically thought about what you have read.  Therefore,
you should not write more than half a page per group member.

Finally, as with the writing assignment, the course packet contains a
rubric that will be used to grade your critiques (you must make a copy
of this rubric and hand it in with your critique assignment).  This
will help you successfully complete this task.   As with the writing
assignment, I recommend that you bring me a copy of your critique
during my office hours (do this before the day it is due).  I will
read your critique and let you know if you are doing the assignment
correctly. AFTER CRITIQUES ARE GRADED, THE EXCUSE, "I MISUNDERSTOOD
THE ASSIGNMENT" WILL NOT, UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES, BE ACCEPTED.

Group Presentations:  During your laboratory (M201), everyone will be
put into groups of 5 or 6 students.  Each group will complete a
project for M201 (this project is covered, in detail, in the M201
Syllabus).  In addition, every group will give a fifty-minute
presentation on their group's project (see Spring Calendar for
presentation dates).  This syllabus contains a grading rubric that
will help each group prepare.  Each group will need to give me a copy
of the grading rubric on presentation day.

Note Card Presentation Assignments: You will be required to complete
five note card presentations.  A note card presentation consists of
the following: First, you will find a journal article (use the
journals listed above to help you find an article) related to the
subject scheduled to be covered in class the day your note card
assignment is due.  Second, you will read the article.  Third, on the
front of a 5 x 7 card, you will write the proper APA citation for
(write it at the top of the 5 x 7 card) and a summary of your chosen
article (do not copy the article's abstract; your summary must be in
your own words).  Also, you will give each member of your group a 5 x
7 card with only your article's APA citation listed at the top (these
cards will be used by your fellow group members to take notes during
your note card presentation).  Fourth, you will make a seven to ten
minute presentation on your chosen article to your group.  In
addition, you will lead your group in a seven to ten minute
application discussion (i.e., your group will discuss how the
information in your article can be applied to the classroom) and
record your group's ideas on the back of your 5 x 7 card.  Finally,
you will turn in your 5 x 7 card on the day you make your
presentation.

Note card presentation due dates are based on a rotation system.  Each
member of a particular group will be assigned to rotation A, B, C, D,
or E.  The syllabus lists when each rotation's note card presentations
will be due.  For example, A and B rotations are scheduled for 1-9-02.
Therefore, everyone assigned to rotation A or B will present their
articles on Piaget to their assigned groups on 1-9-02.  They will also
turn in their 5 x 7 cards.

Finally, as stated under Grading Procedures, there will be no points
assigned for completing the note card presentations.  However, there
will be a 5% deduction from your final grade for each note card
presentation not completed.

Personal Effort Curve (PEC):  There will be four ways that you can
earn extra credit.  First, you will be asked, from time to time, to
observe a child and then write about your observations in the context
of the subject being covered in class (e.g., observe 4 children and
then describe the stage of cognitive development each child is in,
according to Piaget).  Second, you will be asked to create concept
maps for chapters not covered in class.  Third, you will, also, be
asked to complete outlines for chapters not covered in class.
Finally, you will be allowed to complete open-ended extra credit on a
specified topic covered in the class.  That is, you may do anything
you want to demonstrate your knowledge of a specified topic, as long
as you can hand it in.  This includes posters, short stories, etc.
The only things you cannot do are the previously described activities.
Each of these extra credit opportunities are referred to, in the
Spring Calendar, as follows:

PEC 1:  Children Observation (5 points each)
PEC 2:  Concept Map (5 points each)
PEC 3:  Outline (5 points each)
PEC 4:  Open-ended Extra Credit (10 points each)

Course Policies

Participation:  Attendance is required.  I expect you to be in class.

Readings: You are responsible for assigned readings prior to the date
they are scheduled to be covered in class.  Also, you are responsible
for any assigned readings that are not covered in class.  In short,
all reading assignments are fair game for tests.

Writing/Critique Assignments: Late papers will not be accepted unless
prior arrangements have been made well in advance of a due date or an
emergency can be documented (e.g., death in the family, etc.).  All
papers are due when I begin class.  Anyone who turns in a paper after
I have asked for them, but before the end of class, will receive a
1/3-grade deduction.  All papers are to be two pages or less in
length.  In addition, papers must be typed, using twelve font, be
single-spaced, have a one and one half inch margin, and use APA format
when citing sources. All papers must also contain an APA format
bibliography.  Finally, only place your name on the back of the final
page of any paper you turn in.

Group Presentation:  Group presentations must be completed on the date
listed on the Spring Calendar.  No other dates will be allowed.  All
group members will be expected to participate in the presentation in a
speaking capacity.  For each group member who fails to meet this
requirement, the group will receive a 20% deduction from the final
presentation grade.  In addition, each group must give me a complete
annotated bibliography at least one week prior to presenting to the
class (this bibliography is discussed in the M201 Syllabus).  This
bibliography will be placed on reserve for fellow classmates to copy.
Bibliographies that are turned in late will result in a 5% deduction
in the group's presentation grade.

Note Card Presentation Assignments: Late note cards will not be
accepted unless prior arrangements have been made well in advance of a
due date or an emergency can be documented (e.g., death in the family,
etc.).  All note card assignments are to be done on 5 x 7 cards.  Note
cards other than 5 x 7 cards WILL NOT be accepted.  You may hand
write, using black ink, or type your note cards.  Also, note card
assignments will be done using APA format.  Finally, you will not use
articles listed on the syllabus, articles you used for your
writing/critique assignments, or articles used by fellow group
members.

Tests:  Everyone must take the exams.  No makeup exams will be given
unless prior arrangements have been made well in advance or an
emergency can be documented (e.g., death in the family, etc.).  Also,
anyone who arranges to take a makeup exam will be required to take an
essay exam.

PEC:  Extra credit will not be accepted late, under any circumstances.

Graded Assignments: Always keep your graded assignments.  If you
dispute the accuracy of my grade book, the grade in my grade book will
be your grade unless you can show me the actual assignment with the
actual grade given (I recommend you keep your assignments in your
three-ring binder).

Cheating/Plagiarism/Personal Conduct: Please see the student code of
ethics handbook for issues related to cheating, plagiarism, and
personal conduct.  If you are unfamiliar with these policies, you are
required to make yourself familiar with them immediately.

Recommended Course Items

The items discussed below are not required but highly recommended.

Portfolio:  It is recommended that you obtain a three-inch three-ring
binder to create a portfolio for this course.  Things that you should
include in your binder are class notes, writing/critique assignments
you will complete, copies of writing assignments your fellow group
members will complete, copies of the articles you will read to
complete your writing assignments and your note card presentations,
and copies of the articles your fellow group members will read to
complete their writing assignments.  If you will put together this
portfolio, you will have an excellent library of information that you
can add to and use as you continue your education at Indiana
University and begin your teaching career.

Your portfolio will most likely contain the following:
1. Countless pages of notes that cover information important to
Educational Psychology.
2. Up to ten article reviews that contain practical classroom
applications.
3. Up to ten critiques of the practical classroom applications
mentioned above.
4. Up to twenty journal articles that cover a wide variety of topics
in Educational Psychology.
5. Annotated bibliography for five different group presentations on
current educational issues.

5 x 7 File Box:  It is recommended that you obtain a 5 x 7 file box.
This will allow you to organize the note cards you and your fellow
group members create when completing the note card presentation
assignments.  As with the portfolio, if you will follow this
recommendation, you will have an additional library of information
that you can add to and use as you continue your education at Indiana
University and begin your teaching career.

Your 5 x 7 file box will most likely include the following:
1. Five article summaries that contain practical classroom
applications.
2. Brief notes on and practical applications for up to twenty
articles.

Writing/Microteaching Assignment Grading Rubric

Standard / Standard Achieved / Standard Not Achieved /Points Received
Organization  (10 % Points Possible)
The paper is 2 pages or less. / 2 / 0	
Paper is typed, using 12 font / 1 / 0	
Paper is single spaced / ˝ / 0	
Paper has 1 1/2 inch margins / ˝ / 0	
Paper uses APA format / 3 / 0	
Student's name is only on the back of the final page / 2 / 0	
Copy of rubric and article turned in / 1 / 0	
Grammar  (10 % Points Possible)
Paper uses appropriate language (e.g., no slang, no contractions, no
subject/verb agreement problems, etc.) / 4 / 0	
Paper uses appropriate punctuation (i.e., punctuation helps not
impedes reader's understanding). / 4 / 0	
The paper contains less than 5 spelling errors / 1 / 0	
The paper contains less than 3 spelling errors / 1 / 0	
Article Review  (20 % Points Possible)
The article being reviewed is peer reviewed / 5 / 0	
The author's hypothesis, question, or focus was clearly and accurately
summarized / 5 / 0	
Author's findings/conclusions clearly and accurately discussed / 5 / 0	
Student demonstrate a clear understanding of the article by offer some
insights that demonstrate he or she has critically thought about the
article being reviewed / 5 / 0	
Classroom Application Proposal (60 % Points Possible)
Student clearly identifies and describes a problem he or she has
witnessed in his or her classroom and which he or she intends to fix
(this can be a hypothetical situation).  This is not a global problem,
but a problem in your classroom.  If you are using words such as "All
teacher should…", you are not meeting this standard.	Basic ID /7 /
0	
Some Detail / 1 / 0	
Lots of detail / 1 / 0	
Very thorough / 1 / 0	
The student articulates the potential consequences of inaction.  That
is, the student makes a compelling argument that action should be
taken.	Gives some details/Some do not make sense / 7 / 0	
Gives some details/Most make sense  / 1 / 0	
Gives lots of details/Most make sense / 1 / 0	
Gives lots of details/All make sense / 1 / 0	


The student clearly, thoroughly, and appropriately articulates, using
the knowledge gained from the article he or she reviewed, his or her
solution to the problem he or she identified.  That is, the student
applies his or her article to the problem at hand.  Provides a
solution(s) / 14 / 0	
Cites article to support his or her solution(s) / 4 / 0	
Identifies potential problems with his or her solution / 2 / 0	
Student identifies specific outcome goals that can be used to measure
the success of his or her proposal.  That is, the student clearly
identifies what he or she intends to accomplish by implementing his or
her proposal.	Goals are stated / 2 / 0	
Goals are specific / 4 / 0	
Goals are given a timetable / 4 / 0	
Student applies common sense. 	Addressing problem / 1 / 0	
Addressing inaction / 1 / 0	
Addressing solution / 2 / 0	
Addressing goals 1 / 0	
Student demonstrates creativity and originality / 5 / 0	
Total %	100 / 0	

Critique Assignment Rubric
Standard /Standard Achieved / Standard Not Achieved / Points Received
Organization (10 % Points Possible)
The paper is 2 pages or less. 2 / 0	
Paper is typed, using 12 font 1 / 0	
Paper is single spaced ˝ / 0	
Paper has 1 1/2 inch margins ˝ / 0	
Paper uses APA format 3 / 0	
Student's name is only on the back of the final page 2 / 0	
Copy of rubric and article turned in 1 / 0	
Grammar  (10 % Points Possible)
Paper uses appropriate language (e.g., no slang, no contractions, no
subject/verb agreement problems, etc.) 4 / 0	
Paper uses appropriate punctuation (i.e., punctuation helps not
impedes reader's understanding). 4 / 0	
The paper contains less than 5 spelling errors 1 / 0	
The paper contains less than 3 spelling errors 1 / 0	
Critique  (80 % Points Possible)
Student identifies, by full name, each person he or she critiques. 5 /
0	
Student states whether or not he or she agrees with the solutions
being presented. 15 / 0	
Student explains why he or she agrees or disagrees with the solutions
being presented.  That is the student makes an argument for or against
the solutions he or she reads. 15 / 0	
Student points out potential problems with the solutions being
presented, even if he or she agrees with the solutions. 15 / 0	
Student offers possible solutions to the potential problems he or she
has identified. 15 / 0	
Student uses at least three other sources to support his or her
arguments.  Remember, citing a book three times counts as one source.
Three source means three different books, article, etc.	1 Source	
5 / 0	
2 Sources / 5 / 0	
3 Sources / 5 / 0	
Total %	100  0	

Group Presentation Rubric
Standard /Standard Achieved / Standard Not Achieved / Points Received
Professionalism  (15 % Points Possible)
All presenters are professionally dressed (e.g., no shorts, sweats,
etc.). 5 / 0	
All presenters demonstrate professional behavior (e.g., courteous to
those who submit opinions, avoid obscene language, avoid slang,
etc.). 5 / 0	
The presentation is done in a professional manner (e.g., Power Point
is used, etc.).	5 / 0	
Basic Requirements Met (15% Points Possible)
The group presented the instructor with an annotated bibliography 1
week in advance. 5 / 0	
Every group member speaks for at least 10 minutes during the
presentation. 5 / 0	
The presentation is at least 50-minutes long. 5 / 0	
Presentation (70% Points Possible)
Objectives are given at the beginning of the presentation. 15 / 0	
The presentation meets the stated objectives, and each presenter cites
the literature to support his or her claims. 15 / 0	
The presenter captures and maintains the audience's attention. 15 / 0	
Each speaker interacts with the audience while maintaining the focus
of his or her presentation. 15 / 0	
A brief review of the material covered in the presentation is done at
the end of the presentation.  5		
The floor is opened for question, and group members answer the
audience's questions well. 5 / 0	
Total % Points	100 / 0	

M201: Laboratory/Field Experience

Description and Policies:

The purpose of the lab and field experience is to explore practical
applications of theories in educational psychology (it is not a
griping session).  You will use the lab for reflecting on experiences
in the field and to acquire expertise on one of the following current
educational issues.
Inclusion
Gender Equity in the Classroom
Standardized Testing
Alternative Class Schedules (e.g., block scheduling)
Home Schooling and the Public School

Requirements:

M201 is graded as pass/fail.  In order to pass the course, you must
achieve an 80% or greater average on the following activities:
Twenty-one hours in the field (21hrs=100%; 20hrs=90%; 19hrs=80%;
18hrs=70%; 17hrs=0%).  This makes up 40% of your M201grade.

A satisfactory rating of field performance by your cooperating teacher
(satisfactory or above =100%; unsatisfactory and below = 0%).  This
makes up 10% of your grade.

Completion of a group project on one of the following subjects (this
is discussed more in depth later; see rubric for grading procedures).
This project counts for 30% of your grade.

Inclusion

Gender Equity in the Classroom

Standardized Testing

Alternative Class Scheduled

Home Schooling and the Public School

Complete two journals.   These journals will discuss your observations
and activities in the field.  This will makeup 10% of your grade.

Attendance in labs (1 absence=80%; 2 absences=70%; 3 absences=0%; 4 or
more absences will result in an automatic F for M201).  Attendance
will makeup 10% of your grade.

Group Project:

Everyone will be placed in a group of 5 to 6 members (this group will
most likely be the group you are in for note card presentations).
Every group will be assigned one of the group topics listed above.
Each group's job will be to thoroughly research the topic that has
been assigned and prepare a group presentation for P254.  The research
process will occur in the following manner.  Every week (for 6 weeks),
each group member will be require to get two articles (articles must
be peer reviewed) related to the group's topic.  Each group member
will then read his or her articles and prepare an annotative
bibliography (an example of an annotative bibliography can be found in
the course packet; everyone must use APA format, and all
bibliographies must be typed).  In addition, each group member must
come to lab prepared to discuss his or her articles with his or her
fellow group members.

Each group must also pick a group leader.  This person will be
responsible for directing the activities of the group from week to
week (e.g., what particular subject each group member should focus on,
etc.).  In addition, everyone will email his or her annotative
bibliography to the group leader every week (the group leader will set
due dates for this material).  The group leader will then create a
single annotative bibliography and turn it in to me at the end of
every lab meeting.  For example, if a group has 5 members, the first
time I receive an annotated bibliography, I should see 10 annotated
article citations.  The second time I receive an annotated
bibliography, I should see 20 annotated articles cites (i.e., the 10
from the previous week, plus 10 new ones).

Each group will also prepare a typed ruff draft and final draft
outline of their presentation and turn it in to me for comments (see
the M201 schedule for more details on due dates; also, there is a
grading rubric for the outline that must be turned in with the final
outline draft).  Each point of the outline must contain literature
citations to support the point being made.  It is recommended that
groups begin creating ruff outlines early in the project.  This will
help group members focus their researcher efforts, and thereby avoid
wasting time on reading literature that is not relevant to the group's
presentation.

Finally, I expect that your group will need to meet outside of class.
Therefore, full participation in activities inside and outside of
class is required.  To help insure that everyone participates, I have
created the "Turkey Clause".  Simply put, if a group member is not
pulling his or her weight, the other group members may write up a
Turkey complaint.  If I decide that the person in question is not
pulling his or her weight, he or she will be removed from the group.
Anyone that is removed from a group will receive a zero on the project
(i.e., a zero for lab and a zero for the P254 presentation).

Journals:

You will be required to complete two journals.  Each journal must be
typed, single-spaced, use twelve font, have one and one-half inch
margins, and be one page or less in length.  Once you begin visiting
your site, you must turn in your journals on a regular basis.  I will
not accept more than one journal a week per student.  In other words,
I will not accept two journals at the last lab meeting.  If you wait
until the last lab meeting to turn in both of your journals, I will
not accept them.

There are five writing prompts in the course packet.  You will choose
two of the writing prompts and write a journal for each of these
prompts.


M201 Semester Schedule

Date:	Agenda	Groups Meeting Wit