Communication and Culture | Knowledge, Politics and Mediation in Africa
C416 | 1082 | Beverly Stoeltje


African societies today utilize radio, television, video, and
newspapers in social and political life, and at the same time
customary practices,  indigenous languages, and the arts generally,
are attracting renewed interest. This course will examine multiple
genres, forms, and sites where indigenous knowledge and styles of
speaking are utilized to express issues and perspectives in
contemporary social and political life.   Sites to be considered
include traditional courts where individuals bring their disputes
originating in everyday life as well as locations African traditional
leaders are utilizing for AIDS education in southern Africa. Forms and
genres will include face-to-face speaking. courts, music, film and
video. Special attention will be devoted to the role of radio in
contemporary social and political affairs and to the dynamic
production and circulation of film and video in West Africa.
	Graduate Students will write two papers, one focused on a
specific location in Africa, and one on a contemporary form or genre
addressing contemporary issues in the social and political life of a
particular society.
	Undergraduate Students will write 3 short papers focused on
the readings.

	Texts:  (A reader will also be included in the readings).
	
	Maria Eriksson Baaz and Mai Palmberg, eds. SAME AND OTHER:
NEGOTIATING AFRICAN IDENTITY IN CULTURAL PRODUCTION.  (2001)
	Catherine Cole.  Ghana's Concert Party Theatre.  (2001)
	Paulla Ebron.  Performing Africa.  (2002)
	Susan Hirsch, PRONOUNCING AND PERSERVERING: GENDER AND THE
DISCOURSES OF DISPUTING IN AN AFRICAN ISLAMIC COURT.  (1998)
	
	OPTIONAL

	Richaard Fardon and Graham Furniss, eds. AFRICAN BROADCAST
CULTURES:  RADIO IN TRANSITION.(2000)
	Yankah, Kwesi.  SPEAKING FOR THE CHIEF: OKYEAME AND THE
POLITICS OF AKAN ROYAL ORATORY.  (1995.)
	Lindfors, Benth.  Africans on Stage.  (1999)