Education | Academic Assessment and Intervention
P592 | 5796 | Julia Byers


REQUIRED TEXTS:

Shinn, M. R., Walker, H. M., & Stoner, G. (Eds.). (2002).
Interventions for academic and behavior problems II: Preventive and
remedial approaches. Washington, DC:  The National Association of
School Psychologists.

Thomas, A., & Grimes, J. (Eds.). (2002). Best Practices in School
Psychology-IV. Washington, DC:  The National Association of School
Psychologists.

Additional readings online

COURSE PURPOSE:

The course is designed to introduce major approaches and techniques
for individual assessment and intervention with students experiencing
academic difficulties.  Emphasis will be placed on understanding
classroom instructional factors and conducting comprehensive
psychoeducational evaluations that are technically sound and lead to
effective intervention strategies.  Course requirements focus on
practicing assessment procedures in the areas of general academic
achievement, reading, mathematics, written language, spelling, oral
language, listening comprehension, and adaptive behavior, including
the use of these procedures with students from culturally diverse
backgrounds.  The importance of assessing classroom ecology and
linking assessment and intervention will be stressed, along with
effectively communicating results to parents, teachers, and other
professionals that lead to improved interventions and outcomes for
students.

COURSE OBJECTIVES:

1.Develop a comprehensive assessment plan that utilizes a
problem-solving approach to determine a student's educational needs
which considers the interaction of student characteristics, classroom
variables, multiple sources of information, positive educational
outcomes, and research-based interventions.

2.Critically evaluate the reliability, validity, norms, and
standardization of current and newly-published assessment
tools/instruments.

3.Administer, score, and interpret frequently used measures of
academic achievement in reading, mathematics, written language, oral
language, listening comprehension, and adaptive behavior.

4.Identify the critical elements and procedures used in
curriculum-based assessment.

5.Know the historical progression of the defining characteristics of a
learning disability, including the current federal and state
definitions and future state of the field.

6.Identify pros and cons of the various methods and procedures used to
identify learning disabilities and how the procedures may or may not
address federal and state criteria.

7.Know the theoretical underpinnings and procedures for conducting a
process assessment following CHC Theory.

8.Recognize factors that affect the general school performance and
assessment procedures utilized with students from culturally diverse
backgrounds and with students who have sensory impairments (vision,
hearing).

9.Identify and utilize curriculum and instructional adaptations that
meet the needs of students with diverse learning needs.

10.Recognize and evaluate effective instructional variables in
classrooms that produce improved academic achievement outcomes for
students with diverse learning needs.

11.Identify and plan initial stages of  individual and group
interventions that are effective with students experiencing difficulty
with reading, math, written language, or other academic areas.

12.Utilize data collected during assessment to help teachers and
parents develop and monitor effective intervention plans.

13.Effectively communicate the results of academic assessment and
intervention in oral and written form that is responsive to the needs
and understanding of parents and teachers.

COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

1.Each student is expected to attend all class sessions, complete
reading assignments in advance, and be prepared to participate in
class discussion and activities.  Students are assigned
articles/readings to discuss for designated class sessions throughout
the semester (see Course Outline).  Supplemental readings may be
assigned during the semester to address specific issues as they arise
within the course.


2.Each student will conduct practice administrations of 4 selected
assessment instruments and procedures.  A 2-page report should be
turned in with EACH of the protocols which presents background
information (i.e., school history, records review), test behavior,
description of instrument/tasks, test scores, interpretation of
results, and appropriate interventions.  Each practice administration
is due on the assigned date.

For class purposes, reports must be double-spaced.

Serious errors in administration, scoring, or interpretation will
require an additional administration of a particular instrument to
demonstrate proficiency.

Due Date/Procedure

Feb 10 Woodcock-Johnson Test of Achievement - Third Edition (WJ-III)
and Report

Feb 17 Woodcock-Johnson Test of Achievement - Third Edition (WJ-III)
and Report

Feb 24 Wechsler Individual Achievement Test - Second Edition (WIAT-II)
and Report

Mar 3 Wechsler Individual Achievement Test - Second Edition (WIAT-II)
and Report

Mar 10 Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (VABS) and Report

Mar  26	Woodcock-Johnson Test of Achievement - Third Edition (WJ-III)
and Report

Apr 2 Adaptive Behavior Assessment System (ABAS) and Report

Apr 9 Choose One:
VABS or ABAS and Report
WIAT-II and Report
Test of Written Language - Third Edition (TOWL-3) and Report 	
Oral and Written Language Scales (OWLS) and Report


3.Three Reflection Papers based on topics from the course. Guidelines
and grading rubric for these papers will be given in advance.


DUE DATES: 1/17 Plagiarism
2/14  LD Identification Issues
3/28  Topic of YOUR choice from any topic in March or April
		
4.Completion of one take-home exam.  DUE DATE:  April 25 by 5 p.m.

COURSE GRADING:

Practice Administrations 30%
Reports	15%
Reflection Papers 10%
Take-Home Exam 25%
Class Participation 20%


COURSE OUTLINE
P592:  Academic Assessment & Intervention
Spring 2003

DATE/TOPIC

Jan 13 Overview of Course Content and Requirements
	
READING:Plagiarism Website

education.indiana.edu/~frick/plagiarism/

Jan 15 Procedures for Evaluating a Test:  WJ-III and WIAT-II
Validity, Reliability, Norming Procedures

Jan  17	Plagiarism Reflection Paper Due


Jan 20 CLASSES DO NOT MEET

Jan 22 Legal & Ethical Issues in Assessment
READING:  NASP Codes of Ethics (BP Appendix I); Jacob (2002 - BP5)


Jan 27 Woodcock-Johnson Tests of Achievement - Third Edition (WJ-III)

Jan  29	Wechsler Individual Achievement Test - 2nd Edition (WIAT-II)

Feb  03	Assessing General Academic Achievement &
Adapting Assessment to Accommodate Disabilities
READING:  Berninger (2002 - BP54); Fuchs (2002 - BP57)


Feb  05	Written and Oral Communication of Results and Recommendations
READING:  Ross-Reynolds (1990); Sommerstein & Smith (2001);  Murphy
(199?); Fish (2002 - BP26)


Feb  10	Identification of Mild Disabilities: Current
Conceptualizations of LD and MR
READING:  Kavale & Forness (199  ); Flanagan et al. (2000);
Spear-Swerling & Sternberg (1998)

"Protocol and Report Due

Feb  12	Identification of Mild Disabilities: Current
Conceptualizations of LD and MR
READING:  Artiles et al. (1998); Polloway et al.(1997)

Feb  14	LD Identification Issues Reflection Paper Due

Feb 17	Adaptive Behavior
READING:  Reschley & Ward (1991); Gresham et al. (1995);
Harrison & Boney (2002 - BP73)

"Protocol and Report Due


Feb 19	Assessing Classroom Ecology
READING: Shinn & McConnell (1994); Gettinger & Stoiber (1999);
Ehrenberg, Brewer, Gamoran & Willms (2001)




Feb 24 Assessing Classroom Ecology:  TIES-II
READING:  Ysseldyke & Elliott (1999)

"Protocol and Report Due



Feb 26 Reading Instruction
READING:  Foorman (1995); Gersten & Dimino (1993); Adams & Henry
(1997); McGill-Franzen & Allington (1991)	

Mar  03 Assessing Reading Skills:  Norm-Referenced Measures
READING: Aaron (1995); Browder (2001) Functional Reading

"Protocol and Report Due

Mar  05	Assessing Reading Skill:  CBA and CBM
READING:  Fuchs & Fuchs (1998); Howell et al. (2002 - BP48); Gravois &
Gickling (2002 - BP56); Shinn et al. (Interventions II: Ch. 6)

Mar  10	Reading Interventions: Early Literacy & Phonological Awareness
READING:  Good et al. (1998); Englert et al. (1998); Sindelar et al.
(Interventions II: Ch. 26)

"Protocol and Report Due

Mar  12	Reading Interventions:  Comprehension
READING:  Mastropieri & Scruggs (1997); Baker et al.(Interventions II:
Ch. 27); Joseph (2002 - BP51)

Mar 17/19 SPRING BREAK

Mar  24	NO CLASS

Assessing Oral Language & Listening Comprehension
READING:  Cross (2001); Lue (2001)	

Assistive Technology
READING: Alexander & Lue (2001); McGivern & McKevitt (2002 - BP97)	

Mar  26	Language Minority Children & Special Education
READING:  Gersten & Woodward (1994); Lopez (1995-BP94)

"Protocol and Report Due

Mar  28	YOUR Choice Reflection Paper Due

Mar  31	Adapting Curriculum & Instruction for Diverse Learners
READING:  Baker et al. (1998); Switlik (1997); Ebeling (2000)

Apr  02	Written Language/Spelling Instruction, Assessment, &
Interventions
READING:  Graham & Harris (Interventions II: Ch. 22); Baker & Hubbard
(2002 - BP55)

"Protocol and Report Due

Apr  07	Mathematics Instruction, Assessment, & Interventions
READING:  Miller & Mercer (1997); Browder (2001) Functional Math;
Harris, Stine, & Carnine (Interventions II: Ch. 21)

Apr  09	NO CLASS - NASP CONVENTION
"Protocol and Report Due

Apr  14	Grade Retention: Current Practices & Alternatives
School Drop-Out Prevention
High Stakes Testing
READING:  Rafoth (2002 - BP50); Braden (2002 - BP22)

Apr 16	Assessment of Special Populations -  Vision Impairment
READING:  Bradley-Johnson & Morgan (2002 - BP87)
		
Guest Speaker:  Lynne Lewis-Fleming, Vision Impairment Specialist

Apr  21	Assessment of Special Populations -  Hearing Impairment
READING:  Hickok, Bellugi, & Klima (2001); Lukomski (2002 - BP86);
Lopez (2002 - BP88)

Guest Speakers:  Charlotte Smith, Hearing Impairment Specialist
Jay Cherry, Hearing Impairment Specialist

Apr  23 Grading & Homework Practices
Study Skills
READING:  Strein (1997); Keith & DeGraff (1997); Harvey (2002 - BP53)

Apr  25	EXAM DUE by 5 p.m.

Apr  28	Early Childhood Assessment & Intervention
READING:  Conroy & Paolini (2001); Paget (1999)

Apr  30	Assessment & Intervention for Other Health Impairment,
Physical Disability, and Traumatic Brain Injury
READING:  Rapp (1999); Sirvis, Doyle, & Alcouloumre (2001);

Assessment of Perceptual-Motor Skills

Post-Secondary School - Transition Planning
READING:  Vess (2002 - BP101)
	
Course Evaluation

READING LIST
P592: Academic Assessment & Intervention
Spring 2003

Aaron, P.G. (1995). Differential diagnosis of reading disabilities.
School Psychology Review, 24, 345-360.

Adams, M.J., & Henry, M.K. (1997). Myths and realities about words and
literacy. School Psychology Review, 26, 425-436.

Alexander, G., & Lue, M. S. (2001). Augmentative/alternative
communication and assistive technology. In M. S. Lue, A survey of
communication disorders for the classroom teacher (pp. 209-233).
Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Artiles, A.J., Aguirre-Munoz, Z., & Abedi, J. (1998). Predicting
placement in learning disabilities programs: Do predictors vary by
ethnic group? Exceptional Children, 64, 543-559.

Baker, S., Kameenui, E.J., & Simmons, D. (1998). Characteristics of
students with diverse learning needs. In E. Kameenui & D. Carnine
(Eds.), Effective teaching strategies that accommodate diverse
learners (pp. 19-44). Columbus, OH: Merrill/Prentice Hall.

Browder, D. (2001). Curriculum and assessment for students with
moderate and severe disabilities (pp.179-214). New York: Guilford
Press.

Browder, D. (2001). Curriculum and assessment for students with
moderate and severe disabilities (pp. 215-243). New York: Guilford
Press.

Conroy, M. A., & Paolini, S. (2001). Assessment of infants and young
children with disabilities. In S. Alper, D. Ryndak, & C. Schloss,
Alternate assessment of students with disabilities in inclusive
settings (pp. 199-219). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Cross, L. (2001). The development of language skills in school-age
children. In M. S. Lue, A survey of communication disorders for the
classroom teacher (pp. 55-67). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Ebeling, D. G. (2000). Adapting your teaching to any learning style.
Phi Delta Kappan, 82(3), pp. 247-248.

Ehrenberg, R. G., Brewer, D. J., Gamoran, A., & Willms, J. D. (2001).
Does class size matter? Scientific American, 285(5), pp. 79-85.

Englert, C.S., Mariage, T.V., Garmon, M.A., & Tarrant, K.L. (1998).
Accelerating reading progress in early in early literacy project
classrooms. Remedial and Special Education, 19, 142-159.

Flanagan, D.P, & McGrew, K.S., & Ortiz, S.O. (2000). The Wechsler
intelligence scales and Gf-Gc theory (pp. 375-391). Boston: Allyn &
Bacon.

Foorman, B.R. (1995). Research on "The Great Debate": Code-oriented
versus whole language approaches to reading instruction.  School
Psychology Review, 24, 376-392.

Fuchs, L.S., & Fuchs, D. (1998). Treatment validity: A unifying
concept for reconceptualizing the identification of learning
disabilities. Learning Disabilities Research & Practice, 14, 204-219.

Gersten, R. & Dimino, J. (1993). Visions and revisions: A special
education perspective on the whole language controversy. Remedial and
Special Education, 14(4), 5-13.

Gersten, R. & Woodward, J. (1994). The language minority student and
special education: Issues, trends, and paradoxes. Exceptional
Children, 60, 310-322.

Gettinger, M. & Stoiber, K. C. (1999). Excellence in teaching: Review
of instructional and environmental variables. In C. R. Reynolds & T.
B. Gutkin (Eds.) The handbook of school psychology (3rd ed., pp.
933-958). New York: John Wiley.

Good, R.H., Simmons, D.C., & Smith, S.B. (1998). Effective academic
interventions in the United States: Evaluating and enhancing the
acquisition of early reading skills. School Psychology Review, 27,
45-56.

Gresham, F.M., MacMillan, D.L., & Siperstein, G.N. (1995). Critical
analysis of the 1992 AAMR definition: Implications for school
psychology. School Psychology Quarterly, 10, 1-19.

Hickok, G., Bellugi, U., & Klima, E. S. (2001). Sign language in the
brain. Scientific American, 284(6), pp. 57-65.

Kavale, K.A., & Forness, S.R. (1995). The nature of learning
disabilities: Critical elements of diagnosis and classification
(pp.140-186, 287-291). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Keith, T.Z., & DeGraff, M. (1997). Homework. In G. Bear, K. Minke, &
A. Thomas (Eds.), Children's 	needs II: Development, problems, and
alternatives (pp.477-487). Washington, DC: The National Association of
School Psychologists.

Lue, M. S. (2001). Special populations. In M. S. Lue, A survey of
communication disorders for the classroom teacher (pp. 185-207).
Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Mastropieri, M.A., & Scruggs, T.E. (1997). Best practices in promoting
reading comprehension in students with learning disabilities:
1976-1996. Remedial and Special Education, 18, 197-213.

McGill-Franzen, A., & Allington, R.L. (1991). The gridlock of low
reading achievement: Perspectives on practice and policy. Remedial and
Special Education, 12(3), 20-30.

Miller, S.P., & Mercer, C.D. (1997). Educational aspects of
mathematics disabilities. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 30, 47-56.

Murphy, A. (199?). Communicating assessment findings to parents:
Toward more effective informing.

Paget, K. D. (1999). Ten years later: Trends in the assessment of
infants, toddlers, preschoolers, and their families. In C. R. Reynolds
& T. B. Gutkin (Eds.) The handbook of school psychology (3rd ed., pp.
476-496). New York: John Wiley.

Polloway, E.A., Patton, J., Smith, T., & Buck, G. (1997). Mental
retardation and learning disabilities: Conceptual and applied issues.
Journal of Learning Disabilities, 30, 297-308.

Rapp, D. L. (1999). Interventions for integrating children with
traumatic brain injury into their schools. In C. R. Reynolds & T. B.
Gutkin (Eds.) The handbook of school psychology (3rd ed., pp.
863-884). New York: John Wiley.

Reschley, D.J., & Ward, S.M. (1991). Use of adaptive behavior measures
and overrepresentation of black students in programs for students with
mild mental retardation. American Journal of Mental Retardation, 96,
257-268.

Ross-Reynolds, G. (1990). Best practices in report writing. In A.
Thomas & J. Grimes (Eds.), Best practices in school psychology-II.
Washington, DC: The National Association of School Psychologists.

Shinn, M.R., & McConnell, S. (1994). Improving general education
instruction: Relevance to school Psychologists. School Psychology
Review, 23, 351-371.

Sirvis, B. P., Doyle, M. B., & Aldouloumre, D. S. (2001). Assessment
of students with physical and special health needs. In S. Alper, D.
Ryndak, & C. Schloss, Alternate assessment of students with
disabilities in inclusive settings (pp. 273-293). Boston: Allyn &
Bacon.

Sommerstein, L., & Smith, J. (2001). Summarizing and communicating
assessment information. In S. Alper, D. Ryndak, & C. Schloss,
Alternate assessment of students with disabilities in inclusive
settings (pp. 183-198). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Spear-Swerling, L., & Sternberg, R.J. (1998). Curing our 'epidemic' of
learning disabilities. Phi Delta Kappan, 79, 397-401.

Strein, W. (1997). Grades and grading practices. In G. Bear, K. Minke
& A. Thomas (Eds.), Children's needs II: Development, problems, and
alternatives (pp. 467-475). Washington, DC: The National Association
of School Psychologists.

Switlick, D.M. (1997). Curriculum modifications and adaptations. In D.
Bradley, M. King-Sears, & D. Switlick (Eds.), Teaching students in
inclusive settings. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Ysseldyke, J., & Elliott, J. (1999). Effective instructional
practices: Implications for assessing educational environments. In C.
R. Reynolds & T. B. Gutkin (Eds.), The handbook of school psychology
(3rd ed., pp. 497-518). New York: John Wiley.