History | Colloquium in Russian History
H640 | 2877 | Eklof


TOPIC:  IMPERIAL RUSSIA:  THEMES AND ISSUES

The goal of this course is to prepare students for qualifying exams
(both major and minor).  We will read selectively from both standard
works and recent approaches, and we will delve into
historiographical/interpretive frameworks.  Participants will read
in standard textbooks on the Imperial period, comparing treatments,
and then turn to several or most of the following themes: the
Petrine and Catherinian revolutions, the autocratic tradition and
the image of the ruler; the parting of the ways, or rift between
state and society in the nineteenth century; serfdom as
a "functional way of life" and the attempts to reform it; popular
revolt and "everyday forms of resistance"; the Great Reforms; Russia
as a latecomer, a Great Power and an Empire; the decline of the
nobility and the persistence of the Old Regime in late Imperial
Russia; the Liberation Movement of the 1890s, the Russo-Japanese
War, the "great dress rehearsal" Revolution of 1905; the Stolypin
Reforms and Russia's "semi-constitutional" regime (Duma politics);
daily life (was Russia "drifting" toward revolution or
was "normalcy" or what categories governed the lived experience of
workers, peasants, the new middle class, women, minorities).
Students will read one book a week as well as a limited number of
articles, will write 1-2 page responses to the core readings, and
produce a bibliographic essay/ or take an oral final exam.

Recommended:
John Tosh, "The Pursuit of History" (2nd edition: Longman, 1991);
Richard J. Evans, "In Defense of History" (Norton, 1999); Alun
Munslow, "Deconstructing History" (1998); "The Routledge Companion
to Historical Studies"; Marc Raeff, "Understanding Imperial Russia"
(NY, 1984); Geoffrey Hosking,  "Russia: People and Empire"
(Cambridge, 1997); Robert Service, eds., "Reinterpreting Russia"
(1999); Boris Mironov with Ben Eklof, "A Social History of Imperial
Russia" (2 volumes: 1999-2000); Janet Hartley, "A Social History of
the Russian Empire, 1650-1825" (1998); David Saunders, "Russia in
the Age of Reaction and Reform, 1801-1881" (1992); John E.
Hutchinson, "Late Imperial Russia, 1890-1917" (Longman, 1999).