Philosophy | Introduction to Philosophy
P100 | 3353 | Phillips


The goal of this course is to introduce and critically explore a
number of representative issues in Western philosophy.  We will learn
philosophy through doing philosophy itself, which entails thorough and
critical reading, reflection, and discussion.  It is intended that
each student will come away with an educated perspective on major
philosophical issues and a more thorough grasp of how to reason, write
and argue effectively.

Philosophy is the application of rational thought to questions that
cannot be decided through faith, science, or common sense alone.  We
will consider what we can know about God, what exists in the world,
and what it means to be human.  We will examine traditional proofs of
God's existence, the metaphysical topic of what (if anything) exists
in the external world, and essays delving into problems of free will.
Authors studied will include, but are by no means limited to: Anselm,
Aquinas, Hume, Descartes, Berkeley, Locke, and Campbell.

The grades in this class will come from brief weekly homework
assignments based on the reading, in-class assignments, one short
paper (2-3 pages), a longer midterm paper (4-5 pages), and a final
exam.

If you have any questions, please feel free to e-mail me, Jennifer
Phillips, at jenphill@indiana.edu