Education | Child Development
P515 | 6002 | Dr. David Estell


The purpose of this course is to give students an overview of the
study of child development.  As with any survey of a scientific
discipline, this course will include three major things:  theory,
methodology, and the empirical findings themselves.  You will be
introduced to the major theories of human development in the
cognitive, social, and emotional realms, how they came about, how
they advanced the understanding of human development, and the
problems associated with each particular theory.  Like theories, the
methods used to study a particular question have both strengths and
limitations, which makes a careful consideration of them very
important.  Lastly there is of course what has actually been learned
by developmental scientists over the years.  One key element of this
class will be examining how well these theories, methods, and basic-
science findings map onto real-world phenomena, and how they can lead
to practical applications for educators.
	
I hope you will take from this course a deeper appreciation of the
complexities of human development as well as the challenges and
rewards of studying it.

Course Texts
	
Flavell, J., Miller, P., & Miller, S. (2002).  Cognitive development,
(4th Ed.).  Englewood, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Davies, D. (1999).  Child development: A practitionerís guide.  NY:
Guilford.

Various readings (see attached list).

Evaluation
	
Your grade will be based on four areas of evaluation:
Exams (40 points each)................80pts
Critical analysis papers (10 points each)...30pts
Final paper.......................70pts
Presentation on final paper.............20pts
Total...........................200pts

Exams.  The exams will focus on the major themes of the course.  I
will make it clear as we go through the course what kinds of
questions I am likely to ask on the exam.  I will not test you on
minor details, but rather on the major concepts of child
development.  One exam will follow the first section of the course
(cognition and language), the second after the latter portion of the
course (socioemotional development).  Both will be take-home short-
answer exams.

Critical analysis papers.  Each paper will be a maximum of 2 pages,
and will analyze a some of the readings upon which our in-class
discussion will be based.  There will be further instructions
regarding these in a separate hand-out.
Final paper.  The term paper is expected to be approximately 8 pages
long.  The form this paper takes will vary across student
disciplines, and further instructions will be provided in a separate
hand-out.

Presentation.  This will consist of a 10-minute in-class presentation
of your paper.  And guess what?  Thatís right: further instructions
will be provided in yet another a separate hand-out.

Grades will be assigned as follows:

Grade/Percentages/Points
A  94-100 187-200
A- 90-93  179-186
B+ 87-89  173-178
B  83-86  165-172
B- 80-82  159-164
C+ 77-79  153-158
C  73-76  145-152
C- 70-72  139-144
D+ 67-69  133-138
D  63-66  125-132
D- 60-62  119-124
F  59 and down  0-118

Course Material
	
The material of this course will be arranged by topic, though I hope
by the end of the course you will understand that dividing
development into social, emotional, and cognitive areas is simply an
easier way to look it--and that all are interdependent upon each
other.
	
The key to keeping this course interesting for all of us is
participation.  You are to have done the assigned reading prior to
the class for which it is listed, and are accountable for the
information.  This will allow us to use class-time for discussion of
the material and for supplementary information above and beyond that
in the text.  Although lectures and discussion follow the topics in
the books, they will expand on the information in the text.
	
The basic schedule for the course follows...


Tue., Jan. 13
Introduction to the course.
	
Thurs., Jan. 15	Developmental Science: a Conceptual Framework
Magnusson & Cairns (1996)
	
COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT AND EDUCATION
	
Tue., Jan. 20	
Introduction to development.
Flavel chapter 1 & pp. 339-351
	
Thurs., Jan. 22	
Infancy.
Flavel chapter 2 (skip 50-54), chapter 3, & pp. 236-240 (infant
memory)
	
Tue., Jan. 27	
Early childhood cognitive development.
Flavel chapter 4
Davies pp. 240-251
	
Thurs., Jan. 29	
Early childhood cognitive development.
Flavel pp. 139-144
	
Tue., Feb. 3	
Early childhood cognitive development and early childhood education.
Vandell, Pierce, & Stright (1997)
DISCUSSION: WHAT IS APPROPRIATE EDUCATION FOR 2 TO 5 YEAR OLDS?
	
Thurs., Feb. 5	
Early childhood cognitive development and television.
Adams (1999)
ADAMS CRITIQUE DUE AT BEGINNING OF CLASS
DISCUSSION: DEVELOPMENTAL APPROPRIATENESS OF THE SHOW FOR 2 AND 3
YEAR OLDS?
	
Tue., Feb. 10	
Middle and late childhood cognitive development.
Flavel chapter 5 (pp. 144-176)
Davies, chapter 10 (pp. 316-321)
	
Thurs., Feb. 12	
Middle and late childhood cognitive development.
Stigler & Stevenson (1992)
DISCUSSION: STIGLER & STEVENSON
	
Tue., Feb. 17	
Cognitive development, intelligence, and IQ tests.
Shaffer (1996)
DISCUSSION: INTELLIGENCE AND IQ TESTS: USES AND PROBLEMS
	
Thurs., Feb. 19	
Motivation and achievement.
Dweck (1999)
DISCUSSION: DWECK 1999
	
Tue., Feb. 24	
Implications for education.
Silver, Burdett & Ginn  (1993)
SILVER, BURDETT & GINN  LESSON CRITIQUE DUE AT BEGINNING OF CLASS
DISCUSSION: MAMMALS LESSON
	
LANGUAGE
	
Thurs., Feb. 26	
Language.
Flavel pp. 50-54, chapter 8
	
Tue., Mar. 2	
Language.
Flavel chapter 8
	
SOCIOEMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT
	
Thurs., Mar. 4	
Infant temperament and attachment.
Davies Introduction, chapter 1, chapter 6 (pp. 172-176), chapter 8
(pp. 229-232)

	
Tue., Mar. 9	
Attachment.
Cairns (1979)
Shaffer (2000)
	
Thurs., Mar. 11	
Class cancelled: Instructor out of town.
	
Tue., Mar. 16	
Spring Break
	
Thurs., Mar. 18	
Spring Break
	
Tue., Mar. 23	
Predicting childrenís socioemotional development (risk and
resilience).
Davies chapters 2 and 3
	
Thurs., Mar. 25	
Self-regulation.
Davies pp. 117-129, 133-137 (infants), 181-202 (toddlers), 251-164
(preschoolers), chapter 9, and pp. 320-334 (children)
	
Tue.,  Mar. 30	
Parenting.
Davies chapters 5 & 7
	
Thurs., Apr. 1	
Family.
ARTICLES CRITIQUE DUE AT BEGINNING OF CLASS
Demo & Cox (2000)
	
Tue., Apr. 6	
Peers & Culture
Winter (2000)
Rubin, Bukowski, & Parker (1998)
	
Thurs., Apr. 8	
Aggression and violence.
Patterson, DeBaryshe, & Ramsey (1989)
	
Tue., Apr. 13	
Implications for education.
Farmer (2000)
	
PRESENTATIONS
	
Thurs., Apr. 15	
Presentations
	
Tue., Apr. 20	
Presentations
	
Thurs., Apr. 22	
Presentations
	
Tue., Apr. 27	
Presentations
	
Thurs., Apr. 29	
Presentations



Supplemental Readings
Located at:
Direct URL:  http://ereserves.indiana.edu/coursepage.asp?cid=429
Password:  child

Magnusson, D. & Cairns, R. B. (1996).  Developmental science: Toward
a unified framework.  In R. B. Cairns, G. H. Elder, Jr., and E. J.
Costello, (Eds.) Developmental Science (pp. 7-30).  Cambridge,
England: Cambridge University Press.
---------------------
Vandell, D. L., Pierce, K., & Stright, A. D. (1997).  Child care.  In
G. C. Bear, K. M. Minke, & A. Thomas (Eds.), Childrenís needs II:
Development, problems, and alternatives (pp. 575-584).  Bethesda, MD:
NASP.
---------------------
Adams, G. (1999, August 26).  Dumbing down with the Teletubbies.
Bloomington Independent, pp. 5-6.
---------------------
Stigler, J. W., & Stevensen, H. W. (1992).  How Asian teachers polish
each lesson to perfection.  In H. S. Stevensen and J. S. Stigler, The
learning gap: Why our schools are failing and what we can learn from
Japanese and Chinese education (pp. 181-195).  New York: Summit.
---------------------
Shaffer, D. R. (1996).  Intelligence: Measuring mental performance.
In D. R. Schaffer, Developmental psychology: Childhood and
adolescence (pp. 331-374).  Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.
---------------------
Dweck, C. S. (1999).  Caution: Praise can be dangerous. American
Educator.
---------------------
Silver, Burdett & Ginn  (1993).  Mammals.  In Science Horizons,
Sterling Edition (pp. 88-93).  Upper Saddle River, NJ: Authors.
---------------------
Cairns, R.B. (1979).  Social adaptation and social deprivation.  In
R. B. Cairns, Social development: The origins and plasticity of
interchanges (pp. 125-140).  San Francisco:  W.H. Freeman and Company.
Shaffer, D. R. (2000).  Early social and emotional development.  In
D. R. Schaffer, Social and personality development (pp. 104-162).
Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.
---------------------
Demo, D. H., & Cox, M. J. (2000).  Families with young children: a
review of research in the 1990s.  Journal of Marriage and the Family,
62, 876-895.
---------------------
Winter, M. (2000).  Culture counts.  Human Ecology, 28, 12-16.
Rubin, K. H., Bukowski, W., & Parker, J. G. (1998).  Peer
interactions, relationships, and groups.  In W. Damon (Series Ed.) &
N. Eisenberg (Vol. Ed.), Handbook of child psychology: Vol. 3.
Social, emotional, and personality development  (5th ed., pp. 619-
700).  New York: Wiley.
---------------------
Patterson, G. R., DeBaryshe, B. D., & Ramsey, E. (1989).  A
developmental perspective on antisocial behavior.  American
Psychologist, 44, 329-335.
---------------------
Farmer, T. W. (2000).  The social dynamics of aggressive and
disruptive behavior in school: Implications for behavioral
consultation.  Journal of Educational & Psychological Consultation,
11, 299-321.