History | Seminar in Russian History
H740 | 6332 | Eklof


A portion of the above section reserved for majors

This course will look at selected themes in the history of Imperial
Russia.  Students will be required to write numerous 1-2 page single
space responses to readings, and to write a bibliographic/critical
essay 15-20 pages in length to complete the course.  Graduate
students without a working knowledge of Russian are welcome in the
course.  The topics to be covered, subject to change, are as follows:

1)  The “autocratic project:  including how power was structured and
manifested, reform moments and goals; the state’s repressive
apparatus, and Great Reforms, Education, Stolypin and Witte.  We
will not deal extensively with Empire, since Professor Raun offers a
course in this area.
 
2)  The World of the Russian Peasant: daily life, serfdom, family,
resistance and rebellion, literacy, gender, change
 
3)   The opposition movement:  Decembrists, A. Herzen, populism,
marxism, liberalism, nationalism; state and society, society and
folk, the formation of political parties, and the Duma. 
The “women’s question” of the 1860s, feminism and socialism.  The
nobility as a  political force in Russian politics
 
4)  Urban Life, Recreation and Popular Culture

5)  War:   Russia as a Great Power; the Napoleonic, Crimean and
Great wars.  The Russian military
 
 6)  Revolution:   1905 and 1917   (Professor Alex Rabinowitch will
be a guest speaker at one session).
 
Organization:  For most sessions, all students will have a limited
amount of common readings, usually consisting of 1-2 articles; in
addition, each student will be required to read and report on a
monograph for 12 of the 15 sessions.
 
Students signed up for 740 (seminar) are required to do the
(articles) common readings, and to produce an original research paper

Recommended:
John Tosh, "The Pursuit of History" (2nd edition: Longman, 1991);
Richard J. Evans, "In Defense of History" (Norton, 1999); Alun
Munslow, "Deconstructing History"(1998); "The Routledge Companion to
Historical Studies"; Marc Raeff, "Understanding Imperial Russia"
(NY, 1984); Geoffrey Hosking, "Russia: People and Empire"
(Cambridge, 1997); Robert Service, eds., "Reinterpreting
Russia"(1999); Boris Mironov with Ben Eklof, "A Social History of
Imperial Russia" (2 volumes: 1999-2000); Janet Hartley, "A Social
History of the Russian Empire, 1650-1825" (1998); David
Saunders, "Russia in the Age of Reaction and Reform, 1801-
1881"(1992); John E. Hutchinson, "Late Imperial Russia, 1890-
1917"(Longman, 1999).