Communication and Culture | Topics in Rhetoric and Public Culture (Topic: Derrida and the Politics of Deconstruction)
C611 | 24074 | Michael Kaplan


W, 9:30 AM-12:00 PM, MJ 124

Open to Graduates Only!

Instructor: Michael Kaplan
E-Mail: mikaplan@indiana.edu
Office: Mottier Hall 209
Phone: 856-1365

To "think with" deconstruction is to transform one's critical
practice from its aims and presuppositions to its interpretive
protocols and writing practices; it is to reorganize—even
disorganize—one’s habitual modes of thought and to re-conceive one's
objects of analysis in accordance with principles that often appear
antithetical to what usually counts as intellectual labor. It is
perhaps for this reason that Jacques Derrida is frequently invoked
but seldom read. In this course, we will read, as closely as we can,
a selection of Derrida's seminal texts, as well as a few key
introductions to and commentaries on his work. Our aim will be to
begin coming to terms with the far-reaching theoretical,
methodological, political, and ethical consequences of Derrida's
singular intervention into the discourses of the human and social
sciences. If we succeed, students will be in a position to begin
rethinking aspects of their own projects with the aid of the central
critical terms and reading practices particular to the processes of
deconstruction