Folklore | Paradigms in Ethnomusicology
F714 | 25354 | Stone


This course introduces students to the major theoretical
orientations that have shaped the study of ethnomusicology since
World War II.  Topics will include the nature of inquiry;
theoretical foundations of comparative musicology; structural-
functionalist approaches; paradigmatic structuralism; linguistic
theories; Marxist influences; literary and dramaturgical theories;
gender, ethnicity, and identity issues; phenomenology and
experiential ethnomusicology; and postmodern and transnational
orientations.

Students will be expected to provide critical feedback through a
journal documenting their reading. They will also be asked to find
examples of a number of theoretical orientations in the
ethnomusicological literature and write a series of two short papers
of approximately five pages each, analyzing the use of theory in the
chosen ethnographies.  The final project will be a longer paper of
approximately 20 pages, providing an indepth analysis of some
theoretical point, drawing upon the studentsí individual interests.

TEXTS:
Stone, Ruth M. 2007. Theory in Ethnomusicology Today.
Brett, Philip, Elizabeth Wood and Gary C. Thomas. 1994. Queering the
Pitch: The New Gay and Lesbian Musicology. New York: Routledge.
Brown, Richard. 1989. A Poetic for Sociology: Toward a Logic of
Discovery for the Human Sciences.  Chicago: University of Chicago
Press.
Monson, Ingrid. 1996.  Saying Something: Jazz
Improvisation and Interaction.  Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Nettl, Bruno and Philip Bohlman. 1991. Comparative Musicology and
Anthropology of Music. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.