International Studies | Global Integration & Development
I203 | 27250 | Hershey, M.


Course Description:
I203 is the core course for the International Studies concentration
in Global Integration and Development.  As an introductory course it
will focus on the specifics of and interactions between the
political, cultural, social and economic factors that influence
human development at global, national and local levels.  We will
explore these factors at work in developing countries and seek to
blend theory with practical application.  I203 covers a substantial
part of the social sciences literature on development and will
include discussions on dependency, globalization and sustainability
as well.  This course also introduces major theoretical perspectives
on the structure, function and governance of international markets.

Course Requirements:

Class Attendance (10%): Perfect attendance is expected of each
student; excused absences will be granted only in the direst of
circumstances.  In these cases, please obtain class notes from a
friend; I will not provide lecture/class notes to students.  Your
attendance score will be calculated as a direct percentage.  For
example, if you attend every class you will receive 100%; if you
attend half of the classes you will receive 50% for the attendance
portion of your grade.

Preparation/Participation:
Lively, informed discussion amongst students is the key to an
enjoyable class.  Please do all of the assigned readings and come to
class prepared to discuss them.  The readings are due on the day
they appear on the syllabus. As you read, think about the following:
1) what is the topic being covered; 2) what is the author
arguing/what is his/her thesis; 3) is the argument made convincing
and why? 4) how does this compare to what we have read or seen
earlier in the course?

Electronics:
Leave all electronic devices (including cell phones) at home or, if
you absolutely must bring your phone to class, switch it off.
Laptops are the only exception to this rule.  You may use your
laptop for note taking; however, laptops must be left at home on
test days and switched off during presentations.  If I find you
checking Facebook, chatting, playing Solitaire or accessing any non-
class related website you will lose your attendance points for that
day.

News groups (5%): Each student will be assigned to a regional “news
group” at the beginning of the semester.  You are responsible for
remaining informed about the news in your assigned region and
sharing it with the class.

3-page Paper (20%):
You will write a brief paper outlining a development problem present
in a country from your news group’s assigned region.  The paper will
discuss this problem as it relates to one of the economic or
development theories we have discussed in class.  You will use
course materials as a jumping-off point for a discussion of your
chosen theory and outside sources to provide country-specific
information.

You must type in 12-point font and use 1-inch margins.  You must
also include a bibliography and properly cite all sources from which
material is drawn.  Direct quotes, paraphrased text, or ideas taken
from a source (including websites) must be cited.  If you plagiarize
you will receive a grade of zero and you will be reported.

This paper is due at the beginning of class on ____.  It is due
promptly at the beginning of class (in hard copy).  I will not
accept e-mailed papers.  Late papers (including those handed in at
the end of the class) will be penalized at a rate of one full letter
grade per day.  Absolutely no late papers will be accepted after 4
days.

Midterm Examination (25%):
This exam will test your knowledge of development theory and
practice through a combination of multiple choice, identification,
short answer and essay questions.  Concepts and theories discussed
in class and in the readings will be included.

5-page Paper (25%):
This paper will be an extension of your earlier 3-page paper.  In
it, you will draw on the literature from the second half of the
course to propose a solution to the development problem you
identified in the first paper.  You will draw on outside sources to
provide country information.

You must type in 12-point font and use 1-inch margins.  You must
also include a bibliography and properly cite all sources from which
material is drawn. Direct quotes, paraphrased text, or ideas taken
from a source (including websites) must be cited.  If you plagiarize
you will receive a grade of zero and you will be reported.

This paper is due at the beginning of class on ___.  It is due
promptly at the beginning of class (in hard copy).  I will not
accept e-mailed papers.  Late papers (including those handed in at
the end of the class) will be penalized at a rate of one full letter
grade per day.  Absolutely no late papers will be accepted after 4
days.

Final “Conference” Presentation (15%)
During the last two weeks of class we will hold a mock development
conference.  This is your opportunity to share with the class what
you have learned while writing your two papers.  During this 10
minute presentation you will explain the development problem you
identified and present your solution to it.  Your colleagues will
ask questions and give you feedback on your paper, which you are
welcome to incorporate before handing in your final copy.

Grading:
As I described above, your grade will consist of six components:
attendance (10%), contribution to news groups (5%), 3-page paper
(20%), midterm (25%), final presentation: (15%) and a 5-page paper
(25%).  I will use the following grading scale:

Points	Grade
93+	A
90-92	A-
87-89	B+
83-86	B
80-82	B-
77-79	C+
73-76	C
70-72	C-
67-69	D+
63-66	D
60-62	D-
<60	F

Academic Honesty:
All Indiana University policies regarding academic honesty will be
strictly enforced. Plagiarism, cheating or academic misconduct in
any manner will not be tolerated.  I would encourage you to read
Section 3 of IU’s Code of Student Rights, Responsibilities and
Conduct, which describes what constitutes academic misconduct and
can be found at:  http://dsa.indiana.edu/Code/index1.html.

While most examples of misconduct are blatantly obvious, knowing
when and how to acknowledge and appropriately cite sources is
something you may have to learn.  For example, even if you
acknowledge the source, you can not stay too close to the language
of the original source when paraphrasing.  If you are not sure about
anything, please do not hesitate to see me, and we can go over it
together.  Additionally, you may find the Campus Writing Program’s
information useful: www.indiana.edu/~wts/wts/plagiarism.html.

Students with Disabilities:
Students with any disability or special learning needs should
contact me as soon as possible and/or Disabilities Services for
Students (Franklin Hall 096; 812-855-7578) so that any necessary
arrangements can be made.

** Please note. I reserve the right to change any readings, dates
and requirements listed in this syllabus.  If this occurs, every
effort will be made to announce the changes well in advance.  You
are responsible for any changes made and announced in class or via
OnCourse. **