*Carries Cultural Studies and AHLA Credit* Did you know that in Ovid's Metamorphoses you can find an idea of reincarnation similar to that of Buddhism? Or that the Peking Opera strongly influenced one of the greatest modern dramatists, Bertolt Brecht? If you think East and West make an odd couple, whose characteristics and mindsets can never meet, this course will help you reconsider and lay a groundwork for understanding the cultures of both. In this course, we will examine the idea of the self in East and West in three aspects: the self and the society, the self and the family, and the self in relation to nature. We will look at both the similarities and the differences between Eastern and Western cultures through examination of various texts, including films, comic strips, paintings, poetry, drama, novels, and short stories. Texts will include excerpts and philosophical tales from works by Plato, Mencius, Ovid, and Chuang-Tzu; from Defoe's Robinson Crusoe and Kafka's Metamorphosis; from Chinese and Japanese short stories and nature poetry; and from both Eastern and Western landscape paintings. Examination of these texts will also provide students with a chance to recognize the characteristic modes of artistic expressions in each culture. Later in the semester, we will study Chen Kaige's film Farewell My Concubine, Brecht's play The Good Woman of Setzuan and both a play and a film version of David Henry Hwang's M. Butterfly to see how, through often inaccurate representations and selective interpretations, East and West have shaped each other. All texts will be read in English translation. No prior knowledge of Eastern or Western ideas expected. Required: Midterm and final examinations, 1-2 page response papers, and an in-class presentation.