English | Literatures in English 1600-1800
E302 | 1884 | Flannery


1:00p-2:15p TR (30) 3 cr.

OPEN TO MAJORS ONLY. DECLARED MINORS OBTAIN
AUTHORIZATION FROM BH402.

This course introduces students to the relationship between British
literature and the larger culture in the period 1600 to 1800--roughly
from the death of Elizabeth I to the French and American
Revolutions--and includes a consideration of the transatlantic
traffic in literate production. We will read a range of literature from
private diaries and poems originally circulated among only a small
circle of courtiers or intimates to plays, public treatises, and novels
published for an emerging mass audience; and we will consider a
range of issues of interpretation raised by historicizing literature.
Three interconnected themes will serve to structure the course: a
sense of place: England as an Eden and England as emerging
imperial power; literature of intimacy: emerging notions of
individuality and selfhood; literature of religious expression. In
addition to several short papers, course requirements include one
workshopped essay, a midterm and final, and readers' theater
group presentation. Primarily discussion format. Active
participation is expected.

Texts: Robert Demaria, BRITISH LITERATURE 1640-1789;
William Shakespeare's THE TEMPEST; supplementary readings
on reserve and in course packet; Diana Hacker, A POCKET
STYLE MANUAL.