English | Advanced Expository Writing
W350 | 1793 | Hesford


4:00p-5:15p TR (25) 3 cr.

COAS INTENSIVE WRITING SECTION. PREREQUISITE:
W131 OR EQUIVALENT. THIS SECTION HAS BEEN
DESIGNATED FOR EDUCATION MAJORS.

SPECIAL TOPIC: AUTOBIOGRAPHY AND EDUCATION

This section of W350 has been designed for Education majors and
for those seeking secondary certification. It fulfills the advanced
writing requirements of both the School of Education and the
College of Arts and Sciences.

This section of advanced expository writing will focus on the
social, political, and pedagogical dynamics of autobiography in
educational contexts. We will investigate the process of self-
representation, and how autobiographical acts--oral, written,
performative, and visual--play out in vexed and contradictory ways
in campus politics and educational reform initiatives, and how they
become sites of cultural struggle over multiculturalism, "English-
Only" laws, student activism, and commemorative practices. This
course will provide a pedagogical model for teachers to look at
autobiographical practices as material moments of rhetorical action
and to investigate both the progressive and reactionary uses and
consequences of autobiography in education. We will consider the
extent to which rhetorical study of material practices is vital to the
projects of social critique and educational transformation.

The aims of the course are threefold: to help education students
further develop their writing and analytical skills; second, to
explore key issues in teaching and learning; and third, to provide a
rhetorical model of inquiry that prospective teachers can bring to
their future work. In short, this course is designed to help
Education students become reflective practitioners of their craft.

Through a sequence of writing assignments, students will be asked
to analyze the relationship between language, identity, and power
with an eye toward developing an understanding of how cultural
differences shape writing communities and a writer's sense of self.
There is a growing interest among teachers and scholars,
particularly rhetoricians, about the materiality of discourse and the
role of autobiography in academic scholarship and research.
Students will be asked to read and analyze selected "realist" texts
(e.g., testimonies, educational ethnographies, and documentary
films) and their attendant philosophies of education. Students will
explore their own compositional strategies, life experiences, and
educational backgrounds, and consider the implications of these
personal and analytic explorations for their own pedagogical
concepts and classroom practices.

Course format: discussion, workshops, and group presentations.
Course requirements: 5 (4-6 page) essays drafted and revised
during the course of the semester; weekly reading journals; group
presentations; attendance; active participation.

Texts:
David Bartholomae and Anthony Petrosky, WAYS OF READING
(5th ed.)
Wendy Hesford, FRAMING IDENTITIES: AUTOBIOGRAPHY
AND THE POLITICS OF PEDAGOGY
Becky Thompson and Sangeeta Tyagi, NAMES WE CALL
HOME: AUTOBIOGRAPHY ON RACIAL IDENTITY

Recommended:
Chris Anson and Robert Schwegler, THE LONGMAN
HANDBOOK

Films: Marlon Riggs, BLACK IS BLACK AIN'T; Bill Moyer,
RICHARD RODRIGUEZ: AN AMERICAN STORY I & II; and
Rea Tajeri, HISTORY AND MEMORY