Honors | Cloak & Dagger: Detectives and Spies from Sherlock Holmes to James Bond
E103 | 0063-0060 | Bondanella, P.


This COAS topics course discussion section is open to Honors Division
freshmen and sophomores only. E103 topics carry COAS Arts and Humanities credit.

THIS IS AN AUTHORIZED COURSE.
OBTAIN ON-LINE AUTHORIZATION FROM THE HONORS
DIVISION

This discussion section meets with section 0060 (lecture) which meets on MW
at 2:30-3:20 in BH 109.

Topics courses open to Honors Division freshmen and sophomores only. H204
topics carry COAS Social and Historical credit.

E1O3.  CLOAK & DAGGER: DETECTIVES AND SPIES FROM SHERLOCK HOLMES TO JAMES BOND
INSTRUCTOR:  PETER BONDANELLA

"Cloak & Dagger" introduces students to an understanding of literary genre,
the so-called "rules of the game" or conventions governing different types
or categories of creative literature.  It will focus upon the popular
literary genre of "the thriller," but an understanding of literary
conventions will be applicable to any kind of literature not only popular
types such as the detective novel but more "serious" or "high-brow" works,
such as dramatic tragedy or epic poetry.  A secondary but important theme of
the course will examine how the thriller may reflect important ways of
thinking about crucial historical, cultural and political changes (the Cold
War, crime and punishment, political conflict, etc.)  As a major
international conference on Cold War Culture: Film, Fact, and Fiction
(18--21 February 1999) is being sponsored on campus during the time the
course will be offered, students will be asked to attend some of the keynote
lectures on the Cold War and will be given the chance to meet some of the
more important visitors to our campus.

Readings will include some of the classic examples of the thriller, from
Edgar Allan Poe (the inventor of the detective story), Sir Arthur Conan
Doyle (the creator of Sherlock Holmes), Ian Fleming (the creator of James
Bond), Agatha Christie, Jorge Luis Borges, and John Le Carré to Umberto Eco.

In addition to the classic literary thriller, the class will also examine
how the literary conventions of the thriller are modified in cinematic
adaptations. Famous American detectives from the hard-boiled detective novel
(Sam Spade, Philip Marlowe) will be examined in cinematic adaptations by
John Houston (The Maltese Falcon, 1941) and Howard Hawks (The Big Sleep,
1946), two works starring Humphrey Bogart.  As illustrations of the
cinematic treatment of the theme of espionage, the class will analyze two
James Bond films: Terence Young's From Russia with Love (1963); and Martin
Campbell's Goldeneye (1995).

A few secondary essays will be assigned, including some very entertaining
and provocative essays by Umberto Eco on James Bond, Sherlock Holmes, and
the postmodern novel's playful approach to the "rules of the game" in
literature.

Students will be asked to write three brief papers (one of which may be
rewritten for an improved grade) and to take a final examination.  Film
screenings are scheduled during the evening, but films used in the course
are readily available from local video stores.  As in any honors course or
honors section of a larger course, students will be expected to take an
active role in class discussions.

For additional information, please contact Peter Bondanella in West European
Studies (542 Ballantine Hall) at 5-3280.