INTRODUCTION

MISSION

SIGN UP

DATES

CANDIDATE

REQUIREMENTS

GOALS

HISTORY

OVERVIEW

THE ORAL

INTERVIEW

FINAL CODES

REFERENCES

THE APPEAL

EXAM

 

PREPARING FOR

THE APPEAL

EXAM

 

TOEFL

REQUIREMENTS

 

THE INDIANA

ENGLISH

PROFICIENCY

EXAM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GUIDELINES FOR TEPAIC APPEAL EXAM

 

TASK

 

 

CONSIDERATIONS FOR EVALUATORS

 

 

USEFUL STRATEGIES

 

Interview
(5-10 minutes)

The interviewer will ask you questions about your background and educational interests. This part of the exam will help you get used to the setting and help you and the evaluators get used to each other’s accents.
How clearly and fluently you speak

Whether you participate actively in the dialogue

How well you comprehend the interviewers’ speech

How well you clarify misunderstandings
Don’t just answer “yes” or “no” to the questions.

Use your answers to the questions to give more information about yourself or the topic.

If you don’t understand a question, ask for clarification.

Avoid memorized responses.
Lesson Presentation
(7-10 minutes)

Before the exam, prepare a 7-10 minute mini-lesson in your field. It should be suitable for undergraduates in an introductory class. You may find a suitable topic in a course textbook or lab manual. You may use the blackboard. Expect impromptu questions typical of those you might receive from undergraduates.
How clearly and fluently you speak

How you introduce and organize the presentation

How effectively you explain the concept and what strategies you use to promote understanding

Whether the topic is communicated at a level appropriate for undergraduates without much prior knowledge of the concept

Whether the terminology is appropriate

Whether key terms are defined comprehensibly

Whether questions are understood and responded to adequately

How board work promotes understanding
Greet the audience, introduce the topic and tell what you will cover in your explanation.

Be sure to explain new or key terms clearly.

Consider using the blackboard or examples to help promote understanding of the topic.

Check that “students” follow your explanation.
Office-Hour Role Play
(5 min)

One of the evaluators will play the role of a student at an office hour appointment. He will ask a question or express a concern about the subject, a class management issue (tests, absences, homework, grades) or problems (illness, problems with group work). You will respond to the question or concern as you might in a real office hour appointment.
Your interactional communication skills

Whether you grasp the real intent of questions

Whether you respond appropriately

How well you clarify misunderstandings
If you are not clear about the intent of a question or don’t understand the language, ask for clarification.

Talk to an experienced AI about what kind of concerns or questions students bring to the office hour.
Video Questions Handling
(4 minutes)

You will respond to 10 typical student questions presented on videotape (e.g. “When are your office hours?”).
How clearly and fluently you speak

How fully the questions are understood

Whether the replies seem logical
 

This exam is an adapted version of the University of Michigan’s AI exam.
 

 

 

 

Last updated: 12 December 2013
Comments to: dsls@indiana.edu
Copyright 2001, the Trustees of Indiana Universit
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