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Indiana University Bloomington

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Frequently Asked Questions « Undergraduate Studies

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

  1. What is the difference between the EALC and EAS majors?
  2. What languages does EALC offer, and who teaches these courses?
  3. What minors are offered by the EALC Department?
  4. Can I earn both the EALC and EAS majors? What about both minors? How about one major and one minor?
  5. How do I combine my EALC/EAS major with my other interests?
  6. What is LAMP (Liberal Arts and Management Program)?
  7. How can I obtain secondary teacher certification in an EALC language?
  8. If I'm a native speaker of Chinese, Japanese, or Korean, can I major in EALC/EAS?
  9. Can I use my native language to satisfy my foreign language requirement?
  10. How can I take advantage of overseas study opportunities?
  11. How do I receive EALC credit for classes I took through an overseas study program?
  12. How do I receive EALC credit for classes I took at another university, either within or outside of the United States?
  13. I took two years of Chinese/Japanese/Korean at another university (or in high school). Should I just register for the third-year language class?
  14. Who is eligible for special credit in Chinese, Japanese, or Korean, and how do I apply for it?
  15. What do I do if the language class I am supposed to take is full?
  16. How can I use my EALC/EAS degree in the future?

1.  What is the difference between the EALC and EAS majors?

EALC has two majors: East Asian Languages and Cultures (EALC), and East Asian Studies (EAS).

The major in language and culture
emphasizes language training through the third-year level in one of the East Asian languages (Chinese, Japanese, or Korean). In addition to language study, EALC majors take courses on the society's culture, including in-depth study in one subject area. This major is intended for students who wish to develop a solid foundation of language skills and knowledge in one of the three culture areas.

The major in East Asian Studies
includes two years of language training in one of the three East Asian languages (Chinese, Japanese, or Korean), in addition to course work in aspects of East Asian society and culture. It has been designed for students who want basic language training as well as the opportunity to study a variety of topics and approaches to the societies and cultures of East Asian countries.

If you are interested in continuing your education, either major will prepare you for graduate studies. However, it is recommended that students interested in graduate school should complete at least three years of training in one East Asian language.

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2.  What languages does EALC offer, and who teaches these courses?

EALC teaches Mandarin Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. In general, we offer four levels of Chinese and Japanese every year (each level begins in the fall only), and three levels of Korean (first- and second-year are offered regularly).

First- through third-year languages classes are team-taught by supervising faculty members and graduate students serving as Associate Instructors (AI’s).

For more information on the language programs, see the individual language program websites.

3.  What minors are offered by the EALC Department?
EALC offers two minors for students who want to focus on a particular niche in our department. Those who want to concentrate on learning a language may take the minor in Chinese, Japanese, or Korean language. Those who want to study about East Asian culture might consider the East Asian studies minor. See “Minor in East Asian Languages” and “Minor in East Asian Studies” for more details.

4.  Can I earn both the EALC and EAS majors? What about both minors? How about one major and one minor?

No, one may not earn more than one major or minor—or earn a major and minor—from the EALC department.

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5.  How do I combine my EALC/EAS major with my other interests?

Within the College of Arts and Sciences:
Students with EALC/EAS major may simultaneously pursue other majors within the College.

Some fields of interest to EALC/EAS majors are:

Students are also encouraged to minor in disciplines outside of EALC. To declare a second (or third) major or a minor, please contact the relevant department.

NOTE: The Liberal Arts and Management Program (LAMP) offers a certificate program. LAMP allows students within the College to combine their primary interest in their major(s) with courses in business and management. Application is necessary to be admitted to LAMP. For more information, visit the LAMP web site at http://www.indiana.edu/~lamp/.

Outside of the College of Arts and Sciences: Sometimes College students wish to pursue a second degree outside of the College, in such fields as business, journalism, informatics, HPER, or SPEA. To receive a second simultaneous degree requires careful planning and applications through both the outside degree-granting unit and the College itself. For more information, please consult with the academic advisor.

Students wishing to minor in an area outside of the College should consult with the degree-granting unit offering the desired minor.

NOTE: EALC students interested in earning secondary teacher certification in Chinese or Japanese through the School of Education must complete all the degree requirements for the EALC/EAS major and the secondary teacher education program. Since there are many requirements for both the EALC/EAS major and the teaching certificate (including specific sequencing in the teaching methods courses), it is essential that students work closely with both the EALC and the School of Education advisors. For information about the secondary teacher certification program, candidates should contact: Office of Teacher Education, 1000 School of Education (front desk), 812-856-8510.

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6.  What is LAMP (Liberal Arts and Management Program)?

See question 5, above.

7.  How can I obtain secondary teacher certification in an EALC language?

See question 5, above.

8.  If I'm a native speaker of Chinese, Japanese, or Korean, may I major in EALC/EAS?

Native speakers are welcome to major in EALC/EAS, although you must study a language other than your native language. For example, if you are a native speaker of Chinese, you would need to learn either Japanese or Korean to complete language requirements for our majors or for our language minor.

9.  Can I use my native language to satisfy my foreign language requirement?

Yes. If you want to satisfy your foreign language requirement using your native language, you must take a proficiency test to demonstrate your oral and written knowledge of your native language. Proficiency tests are offered at least once each semester; for more information, please contact the main EALC office at 855-1992. If certification of proficiency is awarded, the completion of your foreign language requirement will be subsequently recorded on your transcript.

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10.  How can I take advantage of overseas study opportunities?

First
, you should visit the Office of Overseas Study web site at http://www.indiana.edu/~overseas/ to see descriptions of the various programs available in the country in which you wish to study.

Second
, attend an Overseas Study 101 session, a general informational meeting about study abroad programs, offered weekly during the fall and spring.

Third,
make an appointment with the East Asian program specialist in the Office of Overseas Study; this advisor can describe the specifics of the programs available.

Fourth
, once you have been accepted to an overseas study program, work with your major advisor to choose the classes that will best fulfill your specific degree requirements, allowing you to graduate in a timely manner.

11. How do I receive EALC credit for classes I took through an overseas study program?

Language courses:
Upon a student’s return from overseas, language credits will be determined by the departmental placement/proficiency test. Contact the appropriate language program coordinator. We also recommend you bring back your course materials (syllabus, texts, assignments, quizzes/tests, etc.) for the coordinator to review during your interview.

Non-language courses:
Students must retain and submit course materials (syllabus, list of readings, texts, assignments, notes, quizzes, tests, and papers) for review. Students should give their materials to the academic advisor. In coordination with the Director of Undergraduate Studies, the academic advisor will ask an appropriate faculty member to evaluate the course.

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12.  How do I receive EALC credit for classes I took at another university, either within or outside of the United States?

We utilize the same evaluation process for transfer credits (both domestic and international) as we do for classes from overseas study programs. See question 11, above.

13.  I took two years of Chinese/Japanese/Korean at another university (or in high school). Should I just register for the third-year language class?

No. Since language programs differ in emphasis and material covered, you must take the departmental placement test before registering in any language course. If you have questions or problems, please contact the appropriate language program coordinator.

14.  How can I receive special credit in Chinese, Japanese, Korean?

Students must take the departmental placement exam in order to determine special credit eligibility:

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15. What do I do if the language class I am supposed to take is full?

First
, you must place yourself on the waitlist.

Second
, even if you are still on the waitlist when classes begin, you must attend the class. You should not miss the first day of any language class, since important matters will be explained on that day. Make sure to let your instructor know immediately (at the first class meeting) that you are on the waitlist and wish to enroll in the class.

16. How can I use my EALC/EAS degree in the future?

You can use your EALC/EAS degree in almost any field. While some students only major in EALC/EAS, most of our students have a second major. They combine our EALC/EAS major with a second major or degree (or certificate) to develop a broader perspective that will complement their knowledge of East Asia. For examples of other disciplines in which our majors are interested, see question 5.
Depending on their combination of courses and experiences, students may find jobs in such fields as international relations, news organizations, technology, government, or business management and marketing. Some go on to graduate or professional school, and some become K-12 educators. For some specific examples of our graduates’ professions, please contact the academic advisor.

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