Skip to: search, navigation, or content.


Indiana University

Programs & Events

Monsters & the Monstrous

"The Lucky Tea Kettle of Morin Temple" illustration in which a badger wearing the robe of a monk rests at a table.

Related Print Materials

  • Addiss, Stephen. Japanese Ghosts and Demons: Art of the Supernatural. Lawrence, KY: Spencer Museum of Art, University of Kansas, 1985.

  • Allison, Anne. Millennial Monsters: Japanese Toys and the Global Imagination. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2006.

  • ———. “Portable Monsters and Commodity Cuteness: Pokemon as Japan’s New Global Power.” Journal of Postcolonial Studies 6, no. 3 (2003): 381–395.

  • Bargen, Doris G. A Woman’s Weapon: Spirit Possession in the Tale of Genji. Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press, 1997.

  • Borgen, Robert. Sugawara no Michizane and the Early Heian Court. Cambridge: Council on East Asian Studies, Harvard University, 1986.

  • Blacker, Carmen. The Catalpa Bow: A Study of Shamanistic Practices in Japan. London: George Allen & Unwin, Ltd., 1975.

  • ———. “Supernatural Abductions in Japanese Folklore.” Asian Folklore Studies 26, no. 2 (1967): 111–148.

  • Cott, Jonathan. Wandering Ghost: The Odyssey of Lafcadio Hearn. New York: Knopf, 1991.

  • de Visser, M.W. “The Tengu.” Transactions of the Asiatic Society of Japan 36, no. 2 (1908): 25–99.

  • ———. “The Fox and Badger in Japanese Folklore,” Transactions of the Asiatic Society of Japan 36, no. 2 (1908): 1–159.

  • Edogawa Rampo. Japanese Tales of Mystery and Imagination. Rutland, VT: Tuttle, 1956.

  • Figal, Gerald. Civilization and Monsters: Spirits of Modernity in Meiji Japan. Durham: Duke University Press, 1999.

  • ———. “The Folk and the Fantastic in Japanese Modernity: Dialogues on Reason and Imagination in Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Century Japan.” Ph.D. diss., University of Chicago, 1992.

  • Foster, Michael Dylan. “The Question of the Slit-Mouthed Woman: Contemporary Legend, the Beauty Industry, and Women’s Weekly Magazines in Japan.” Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 32, no. 3 (2007): 699–726.

  • ———. “Strange Games and Enchanted Science: The Mystery of Kokkuri.” The Journal of Asian Studies 65, no. 2 (2006): 251–275.

  • ———. “The Metamorphosis of the Kappa: Transformation of Folklore to Folklorism in Japan.” Asian Folklore Studies 57 (Fall 1998): 1–24.

  • Griffis, Elliot, trans. Japanese Fairy Tales. Franklin, NH: Hillside Press, 1962.

  • Hearn, Lafcadio. In Ghostly Japan. 1899. Reprint, Rutland, VT: Tuttle, 1971.

  • ———. Shadowings. 1900. Reprint, Rutland, VT: Tuttle, 1971.

  • ———. Kokoro: Hints and Echoes of Japanese Inner Life. 1896. Reprint, New York: ICG Muse, 2001.

  • ———. Kottô: Being Japanese Curios, with Sundry Cobwebs. New York: Macmillan Company, 1902.

  • ———. Kwaidan: Stories and Studies of Strange Things. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1904.

  • ———. Japanese Fairy Tales. Mount Vernon, NY: Peter Pauper Press, 1958.

  • ———. Earless Hôichi: A Classic Japanese Tale of Mystery. Tokyo: Kodansha International, 1966.

  • Ivy, Marilyn. Discourses of the Vanishing: Modernity, Phantasm, Japan. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1995.

  • Iwaya Sazanami. Japanese Fairy Tales. Tokyo: Hokuseido Press, 1938.

  • Izumi Kyoka. Japanese Gothic Tales. Translated by Charles Inouye. Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press, 1996.

  • Jones, Sumie. “The Other Side of the Hakone: Ghosts, Demons, and Desire for Narrative in Edo Literature.” In Desire for Monogatari: Proceedings of the Second Midwest Reserch/Pedagogy Seminar on Japanese Literature (later renamed Publication of Association for Japanese Literary Studies, or PAJLS) 2, edited by Eiji Sekine, 53–78. West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University, 1994.

  • ———. “Hakone no Mukô: Edo no Kaii-Shumi to Monogatari e no Yokubô” (Beyond the Hakone: Taste for the Gory and Desire for Narrative in Edo Arts). In Uta no Hibiki/Monogatari no Yokubô (Echoes of Poetry/Desire for Narrative), edited by Eiji Sekine, 181–210. Tokyo: Shinwasha, 1996.

  • Jones, Susan, trans. Ages Ago: Thirty-seven Tales from the Konjaku Monogatari Collection. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1959.

  • Josephson, Jason Ânanda. “When Buddhism Became a ‘Religion’: Religion and Superstition in the Writings of Inoue Enryō.” Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 33, no. 1 (2006): 143–168.

  • Kalat, David. J-Horror: The Definitive Guide to The Ring, The Grudge and Beyond. New York: Vertical, 2007.

  • Kelsey, Michael. Konjaku Monogatari-shū. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1982.

  • Klein, Susan B. “Woman as Serpent: The Demonic Feminine in the Noh Play Dōjōji.” In Religious Reflections on the Human Body, edited by Jane Marie Law, 100–136. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1995.

  • Kuroda Toshio. “The World of Spirit Pacification: Issues of State and Religion.” Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 23, no. 3/4 (1996): 231–51.

  • Markus, Andrew L. “The Carnival of Edo: Misemono Spectacles from Contemporary Accounts.” Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies 45, no. 2 (1985): 499–541.

  • McMullin, Neil. “On Placating the Gods and Pacifying the Populace: the Case of the Gion ‘Goryō’ Cult.” History of Religions 27 (1988): 270–93.

  • Mishima Yukio. Five Modern Noh Plays. Translated by Donald Keene. New York: Vintage Books, 1973.

  • Mizuki Shigeru. Ge Ge Ge no Kitaro. Vols. 1 - 3. Translated by Ralph F. McCarthy. Tokyo: Kodansha International, 2002.

  • Morse, Ronald. Yanagita Kunio and the Folklore Movement: The Search for Japan’s National Character and Distinctiveness. New York: Garland Publishing, 1990.

  • Napier, Susan J. The Fantastic in Modern Japanese Literature: The Subversion of Modernity. New York: Routledge, 1996.

  • Reichert, Jim. “Deviance and Social Darwinism in Edogawa Ranpo’s Erotic-Grotesque Thriller Kotō no oni.” Journal of Japanese Studies 27, no. 1 (2001): 113–141.

  • Reider, Noriko T. “The Emergence of Kaidan-shū: The Collection of Tales of the Strange and Mysterious in the Edo Period.” Asian Folklore Studies 60, no. 1 (2001): 79–99.

  • Robbins, Tom. Villa Incognito. New York: Bantam Books, 2003.

  • Scofield, Elizabeth. Hold Tight, Stick Tight: A Collection of Japanese Folk Tales. Palo Alto, CA: Kodansha International, 1966.

  • Seki Keigo, ed. Folktales of Japan. Translated by Robert J. Adams. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1963.

  • Smyers, Karen. The Fox and the Jewel: Shared and Private Meanings in Contemporary Japanese Inari Worship. Honolulu: University of Hawai’i Press, 1999.

  • Staggs, Kathleen M. “‘Defend the Nation and Love the Truth’: Inoue Enryō and the Revival of Meiji Buddhism.” Monumenta Nipponica 38, no. 3 (1983): 251–281.

  • Strassberg, Richard E., ed. and trans. A Chinese Bestiary: Strange Creatures from the Guideways through Mountains and Sea. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002.

  • Takeuchi, Melinda. “Kuniyoshi’s Minamoto Raikō and the Earth Spider: Demons and Protest in Late Tokugawa Japan.” Ars Orientalis 17 (1987): 5–23.

  • Tobin, Joseph, ed. Pikachu’s Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokémon. Durham: Duke University Press, 2004.

  • Tsutsui, William. Godzilla on My Mind: Fifty Years of the King of Monsters. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004.

  • Tyler, Royall. Japanese Tales. New York: Pantheon Books, 1987.

  • Ueda Akinari. Ugetsu Monogatari: Tales of Moonlight and Rain: A Complete English Version of the Eighteenth-century Japanese Collection of Tales of the Supernatural. Translated by Leon M. Zolbrod. Vancouver: University of British Columbia Press, 1974.

  • Ury, Marian. “A Heian Note on the Supernatural.” Journal of the Association of Teachers of Japanese 22, no. 2 (1988): 189–94.

  • ———. Tales of Times Now Past: Sixty-two Stories from a Medieval Japanese Collection. Ann Arbor, MI: Center for Japanese Studies, University of Michigan, 1993.

  • Yanagita Kunio. Japanese Folktales. Translated by Fanny Hagin Mayar. Tokyo: Tokyo News Service, 1954.

  • ———. Japanese Folktales: A Revised Selection. Translated by Fanny Hagin Mayar. Taipei: Orient Cultural Service, 1972.

  • ———. The Legends of Tono. Translated by Ronald A. Morse. Tokyo: The Japan Foundation, 1975.

  • ———. The Yanagita Kunio Guide to the Japanese Folk Tale. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1986.