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Indiana University

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EASC Newsletter

A publication of the East Asian Studies Center, Indiana University

June 2015

Student Updates

Aaron Albin (Linguistics, Second Language Studies) received an EASC travel grant of $75 to present “Rapid Word Learning in Trilingual children: One Spurt or Three?” at the 13th Generative Approaches to Second Language Acquisition Conference in Bloomington, March 4-6. He co-presented a talk with Dr. Yoshihisa Kitagawa (Linguistics) as part of the Linguistics Department’s Colloquium Series, titled “The interaction of Fortition, Lenition, and Voicing in Japanese: Diachronic and Experimental Evidence” on April 17. He defends his dissertation “Typologizing Native Language Influence on Intonation in a Second Language: Three Transfer Phenomena in Japanese EFL learners” on May 14. He will present a poster on his dissertation at the Experimental and Theoretical Advances in Prosody Conference in Urbana-Champaign, May 28-30.

 

Dongchoel Bin (EALC) defended his PhD dissertation in Chinese in August 2014 and graduated in October of the same year.

 

Alex Burch (EALC and School of Public and Environmental Affairs) completed the dual MA/MPA in Chinese and Public Financial Administration in August 2014.

 

Jingjing Cai (EALC) was awarded an EASC travel grant of $250 to defray expenses for presenting “A Feminist Outcry or a Self-defeating Satire? The Creation and Destruction of a Lesbian Utopia in "Carnation Club” at the 2015 Graduate Student Conference on East Asia at Columbia University, February 20-21. Also this spring, she won the highly competitive College of Arts and Sciences Dissertation Year Research Fellowship for AY 2015-16, so she will be working full-time this coming year on writing her dissertation.

 

Eric Carlucci (Anthropology) was awarded an EASC travel grant of $250 to defray expenses for presenting “Neolithic Northern China in the Context of Early Eurasian Interactions” at the 2015 Society for American Archeologists Annual Conference in San Francisco, April 15-20.

 

Yajing Chen (Educational Policy and Leadership Studies) was awarded an EASC travel grant of $250 to defray expenses for presenting “Creating a Home Away From Home: Chinese Undergraduate Student Enclaves In U.S. Higher Education” at the 2015 Comparative and International Education Society Conference in Washington, D.C., March 8-13.

 

Yanfei Chen (EALC) completed the MA in Chinese language pedagogy in August 2014; she is currently employed as a Chinese lecturer at Johns Hopkins University.

 

Sara Conrad (Central Eurasian Studies and Anthropology) was awarded an EASC travel grant of $250 to defray expenses for presenting “Motherhood in Exile” at the Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference in Chicago, March 26-29.

 

Nicole Dabney (EALC) completed the MA in Chinese in October 2014.

 

Lynn Dearden (EALC), a candidate for the MA in Japanese, has been spending AY 2014-15 at the Inter-University Center-Yokohama for advanced Japanese language study, courtesy of the FLAS fellowship she was awarded last year.

 

Marina Dmukhovskaya (EALC) was awarded an EASC travel grant of $250 to defray expenses for presenting “Olympic Movement as a Soft Power Tool for Realization of Foreign Policy of South Korea” at the 2015 McGill East Asian Studies Graduate Symposium in Montreal, April 16-19.

 

Jessica Harding (EALC) completed the MA in Chinese in May 2015.

 

Misato Hiraga (EALC) completed the MA in Japanese language pedagogy in June 2014. She spent AY 2014-15 teaching at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, but will return to IU in the fall as a PhD candidate in the Department of Linguistics.

 

Daniel Idziak (EALC) is completing the MA in East Asian Studies (Chinese focus) in summer 2015.

 

Dan Jin (EALC) is finishing up the MA in Chinese pedagogy and has taken a position as teaching fellow at Vassar College, set to begin in the fall.

 

Rio Katayama (EALC) is completing the MA in Japanese language pedagogy this June. She has been accepted into the PhD program in East Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Southern California, and awarded a full financial aid package: three years of fellowship support and two years of teaching assistantships.

 

Andrew Kauffman (EALC) was awarded an EASC travel grant of $250 to defray expenses for presenting “Unending Emotions: Zhang Ailing's Transition into the World of the Silver Screen” at the 2015 Graduate Student Conference on East Asia at Columbia University, February 20-21.

 

David Kendall (EALC) is completing the MA in East Asian Studies (Korean focus) in summer 2015.

 

Yumi Kotera (EALC) was awarded an EASC travel grant of $250 to defray expenses for presenting “The Benefit of Metalinguistic Explanation on Direct Corrective Feedback” at the 2015 Central States Conference on the Teaching of Foreign Languages in Minneapolis, March 12-14. She will be spending the summer as an instructor at Middlebury College’s prestigious Japanese language immersion program.

 

Yi-Lu Kuo (Literacy, Culture and Language Education) recently earned her PhD degree from IU and has taken a position as lecturer at the University of Chicago.

 

Yu-San Lai (EALC), a 1st-year MA student in Chinese pedagogy, served as a volunteer instructor this semester in the Ya Ya I beginning Chinese class, a free course offered to children in the Bloomington community. Ya Ya I’s final class of the spring semester took place on Saturday, April 18. Other volunteers included Rain Zhang, Morgan Peele, Yanlin Chen, and Yixuan Ma. The program was directed by Vesna Dimitrieska.

 

Chelsea Liddell (EALC) completed the MA in East Asian Studies (Japanese focus) in August 2014.

 

Meng Liu (EALC) is completing the MA in Chinese language pedagogy in May 2015.

 

Vera Marinova (EALC) completed the MA in East Asian Studies (Chinese focus) in May 2014. This degree follows two MPA degrees – one in Nonprofit Management and the other in Comparative and International Affairs – earned from the School of Public and Environmental Affairs in 2011.

 

Bethany Muncy (EALC) is completing the MA in East Asian Studies (Japanese focus) in summer 2015.

 

Jim Nagler (EALC) plans to complete the MA in Chinese in August. He has been accepted into the PhD program in Media Studies, set to begin in the fall.

 

Megumi Otake (EALC) is completing the MA in Japanese language pedagogy in summer 2015. She has taken a teaching position at Western Carolina University for AY 2015-16.

 

Joannah Peterson (EALC), PhD candidate in Japanese, will defend her dissertation at the end of summer 2015.

 

John Quarles (EALC) is completing the MA in Japanese in May 2015.

 

Anthony Ross (EALC) was awarded a Critical Language Scholarship (CLS) for two months of fully-funded advanced Korean study in Gwangju, South Korea. He is planning to complete the MA in East Asian Studies (Korea focus) this summer.

 

Wenjuan Sang (Educational Policy and Leadership Studies) was awarded an EASC travel grant of $250 to defray expenses for presenting “Latent Profile Analysis of Undergraduate Students' Motivation for Science Courses: A Comparison between the United States and China” at the 2015 Comparative and International Education Society Conference in Washington, D.C., March 8-13.

 

Kohei Suzuki (Political Science and School of Public and Environmental Affairs) was awarded an EASC travel grant of $250 to defray expenses for presenting “Explaining Local Citizens' Responses to Public Services Retrenchment” and “Recentralization and Municipal Performance: Assessing the Impact of Municipal Mergers on Local Government Performance” at the Midwest Political Science Association Annual Conference in Chicago, April 15-19.

 

Kazuhide Takeuchi (EALC) is completing the MA in Japanese language pedagogy in May 2015.

 

J.C. Wamsley (Linguistics) placed fourth in the advanced level of competition at the Indiana University Chinese Speech Contest, March 7.

 

Hsiang-Ning Wang (Comparative and International Education) recently earned her PhD degree from IU and has taken a position as lecturer at the University of Virginia, set to begin in the fall.

 

Pei-Shan Yu (Literacy, Cultural and Language Education) was awarded an EASC travel grant of $250 to defray expenses for presenting “Heritage Language Investment in American College Language Classroom Setting:  Implications for Hertitage Language Teaching” at the National Council of Less Commonly Taught Languages in Washington, D.C., April 24-26. Pei-Shan is completing her PhD degree this summer, and has taken a position as lecturer at Georgetown University, set to begin in the fall.

 

Huiqi Zhou (EALC) is completing the MA in Chinese literature in summer 2015.

 

Zejun Zhou (Educational Leadership and Policy Studies) was awarded an EASC travel grant of $250 to defray expenses for presenting “Pun-loving Resistors or Passive Realists: Upper Middle Class Chinese Youth and the Chinese State” at the 2015 Comparative and International Education Society Conference in Washington, D.C., March 8-13.

 


 

Undergraduate Award Winners

Congratulations to the following undergraduate EALC majors and minors who have received EALC scholarships:

  • Madeleine Hanley (Telecommunications/EALC); Drew Kunard (EALC); and Ariel Uesseler (EALC) were awarded Uehara Scholarships. This scholarship was created in honor of the late professor Toyoaki Uehara for undergraduates showing excellence in East Asian studies.
  • Pierce Langdon (General Studies) received the Yasuda Scholarship, which was created in honor of Professor Emeritus Kenneth Yasuda for undergraduates demonstrating excellence in Japanese studies.
  • Bailey Riggs (International Studies) was awarded the Korean Visiting Scholars’ Award. This award was made possible by the IU Korean Visiting Scholars Association and was established to help promote excellence in the study of Korean language and culture.
  • Emily Zhang (Neuroscience) received the Gines Scholarship for her excellence in Chinese and the Kelley School of Business, an award given by James Gines and his wife, Noriko, to undergraduates combining excellence in an East Asian language with excellence in pre-professional school studies.
  • Caitlyn Foley (EALC) received the Nutter Scholarship, an award created in memory and honor of Paul Nutter, an EALC undergraduate Japanese major. The award is given annually to an undergraduate student demonstrating the same heart and commitment to learning as Paul did.

The following EALC undergraduate students received EASC prizes for excellence in East Asian studies:

  • Jordan Chen (EALC)—the Undergraduate Award for Chinese Studies
  • Elizabeth McClary (EALC/ International Studies) —the SOFOKS Award for Korean Studies

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Student Profile: Morgan Peele

Ph.D., Sociology 

Morgan Peele, a 1st-year doctoral student of sociology at IU, has recently been awarded a prestigious fellowship by the National Science Foundation. As a recipient of the NSF’s Graduate Research Fellowship Program (NSF-GRFP), Peele will receive three years’ funding for her graduate studies. This award follows on the heels of a FLAS fellowship she received for her first year of study at IU, during which she dove into fourth-year Chinese language classes and a broad range of social science courses. In addition to coursework and volunteer activities, Peele has also made a point to set aside time for preliminary work on her master’s thesis. Since some of the materials she’s been consulting are published only in Chinese, improving her language proficiency has been instrumental in being able to pursue her research interests.

 

Before coming to IU, Peele completed a year of research in China as a Fulbright Fellow, observing childcare practices in the coastal city of Hangzhou. This experience taught her how to network effectively and to conduct research; it also revealed to her the importance of improving her Mandarin language skills. With this in mind, during her first year at IU she has supplemented Chinese language classes with volunteer experience teaching Chinese. During the spring semester, she served as assistant instructor in an IU-sponsored volunteer group that offered beginning Chinese language and culture lessons to elementary school students in the Bloomington community. She hopes to continue volunteering with the program in future semesters.

 

As a rising second-year PhD student, Peele’s research path is still wide open. Even so, she has already begun considering potential options for a dissertation topic. She is particularly keen on researching Chinese people’s attitudes toward geriatric care. As numbers of Chinese citizens reaching old age will amount to hundreds of millions over the next few decades, it isn’t hard to surmise that such research could be of no small importance to future policymakers, healthcare providers, social justice organizations and other interested parties. At any rate, finalizing a dissertation topic will be a few years from now, and Peele may later set her sights in another direction. No matter what she chooses, we at EASC look forward to keeping up with her future research and offer our congratulations on her commendable academic achievements.

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