Engs, Ruth C. The drug use patterns of helping profession students in Brisbane, Australia. Drug and Alcohol Dependence  6 (1980): 231 - 246.

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THE DRUG-USE PATTERNS OF HELPING-PROFESSION STUDENTS IN BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA*

Ruth C. Engs
Department of Health and Safety Education
Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (U.S.A.)
*This project was carried out while the author was on sabbatical leave at the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia, January-June, 1980.

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Abstract of article

A survey of 1691 first- and final-year students in the helping professions (medicine, law, nursing, pharmacy, police science, seminary, social work/psychology, and teaching) as to their use of drugs was carried out during February to April, 1980, in Brisbane, Australia. The results indicated that about 86% drank coffee or tea, 85% drank alcohol, 85% used non-prescription analgesics, 31% used tobacco, 25% antihistamines, 9% marijuana, 9% sedatives, 6% tranquilizers, 2% hallucinogens, 2% stimulants, 1% cocaine and 1% used opiates at least once a year. Of these students, females used analgesics and antihistamines significantly more frequently than males and consumed more caffeine, tobacco and analgesics than males, while males drank significantly more alcohol than females. Final-year students used more alcohol, coffee or tea and tobacco, and used marijuana, coffee and tea and tobacco significantly more frequently than first-year students. Individuals who did not consider relation important used more alcohol and tobacco and used marijuana, tobacco and hallucinogens more frequently compared to individuals who considered religion to be important. There was also a significant difference in drug usage between the different courses of study for most of the substances, with law students using the majority of substances the most frequently and seminarians the least frequently.