Adam Leite

Associate Professor of Philosophy, Indiana University, Bloomington

Current Research

Papers

Teaching

 

 

Department of Philosophy
Sycamore Hall 026
Indiana University
1033 E. Third St.
Bloomington, IN 47405
(812) 856-4148

Leite e-mail

 

CV

 

Indiana University Department of Philosophy

Current Research

My current research covers a broad range of topics in contemporary epistemology, including skepticism, empirical justification, testimony, epistemic reasons and epistemic normativity, and the relation between epistemological categories and our practices of assertion and justification. Much of my work in epistemology is continuous with issues pertaining to metaethics, moral psychology, philosophy of action, and the nature of commonsense psychological explanation. Roughly speaking, I approach epistemic norms and evaluation as part of the broader project of understanding the nature of norms and the forms of evaluation they engender, and I regard both epistemic norms and epistemic appraisal of persons as deeply related to the facts that we are social and deliberative beings: beings capable of making, evaluating, and accepting or rejecting claims to and upon each other as well as of determining our beliefs (and other attitudes) by considering reasons in the course of deliberation. I have historical interests including Ancient Greek Philosophy, Kant, Wittgenstein, and the history of Analytic Philosophy. Despite my work's contemporary flavor, I see it as belonging in large part to a tradition that includes G. E. Moore, Wittgenstein, and J. L. Austin: much of my epistemological data arise from careful investigations of our actual epistemic practices, and my response to, e.g., external world skepticism, begins from a position within those practices, asking what reason we can give ourselves for changing our views in the ways the skeptic suggests we should. One of my future projects is a study of (the history of) Ordinary Language Philosophy clarifying its aims and methods, its genuine weaknesses, and its lasting (though neglected) contributions. I am also becoming increasingly interested in philosophical aspects of psychoanalytic thought.

Here are some of the issues I have been working on in the recent past:

 

Papers

Here (ResearchStatement) is an attempt, now out of date, to tie together some of my thinking. It written as part of my tenure dossier (2005; promotion to associate professor with tenure, 2006).

Teaching

I regularly teach introduction to philosophy, upper-level undergraduate courses on epistemology, philosophy of action, and Wittgenstein, and a variety of graduate courses. My standard introductory course, "Appearance and Reality," is historically oriented, with readings from Plato, Descartes, Berkeley, Kant, and Schlick. My standard upper-level undergraduate epistemology course includes units on external world skepticism, a priori knowledge, and knowledge of mind (self knowledge and knowledge of other minds). I have taught graduate seminars on self-knowledge, empirical justification, the epistemology of testimony, history of analytic philosophy (Sellars, Quine, Davidson), and epistemic and practical normativity (with Kevin Toh). I am currently advising dissertation projects on perception, reasons and experience, and epistemic responsibility. I am or have recently been involved in dissertation projects on a priori knowledge, metaphysical aspects of explanation, guidance by norms, epistemological aspects of classification, Levinas and epistemic reasons, Kierkegaard on communication, and Kierkegaard on self-deception.

Last updated 6/09