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Fall 2016 Undergraduate Course Offerings

Folk-F101 Introduction to Folklore
Instructor: Brandon Barker
MW 11:15am-12:05pm +discussion section
CASE A&H; GenEd A&H
Course # 3802

Lecture Location: Chemistry 122

Folklore is alive. It inspires the choices we make every day: how we communicate, what foods we eat, what games we play, what stories we tell, how we interpret the world around us. Folklore reflects our values, our prejudices, our fears, and our desires. The practices, beliefs, and objects that constitute folklore are so intrinsic to our daily lives that they are often overlooked in other disciplines that study human culture, but every culture has folklore and we are all part of the folk. In this course we will consider the role folklore plays in the lives of people around the world. 

Folk-F101 Introduction to Folklore
Instructor: Robert Dobler
TR 10:10-11:00am +discussion section
CASE A&H; GenEd A&H
Course #
13035
Lecture Location: 800 N Indiana Ave

Folklore is alive and inspires the choices we make every day: how we communicate, what foods we eat, what games we play, what stories we tell, how we interpret the world around us. Folklore reflects our values, our prejudices, our fears, and our desires. The practices, beliefs, and objects that constitute folklore are so intrinsic to our daily lives that they are often overlooked in other disciplines that study human culture, but every culture has folklore and we are all part of the folk. In this course we will consider the role folklore plays in the lives of people around the world.

Folk-F111 World Music & Culture
Instructor: Jennie Gubner

TR 2:30-3:45pm
CASE A&H; GenEd A&H
Course # 36504

Location: Classroom Office Building Room 203 (800 E 3rd St)

This introductory survey course engages students in a broad overview of selected musical cultures from around the world, focusing on examples from Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Europe. Whenever possible, we will consider music-making locally, in and around Bloomington. Organized around case studies and broad themes, this course will explore the ways in which the musical traditions presented are shaped by and give shape to the social and cultural environments from which they come. Since different musical styles have different structures and meanings, we will learn new ways of listening to understand with greater clarity the significance that music and music making have for those who perform, listen, and otherwise engage with it. Mindfully listening to music means not just learning to hear characteristics of sound, but also learning to analyze and interpret different cultural approaches to music making and enjoyment.

Folk-F111 World Music & Culture
Instructor: Jennie Gubner
TR 11:15am-12:05pm +discussion section
CASE A&H; GenEd A&H, World Cultures
Course # 3808

Lecture Location: Morrison 007

This introductory survey course engages students in a broad overview of selected musical cultures from around the world, focusing on examples from Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Europe. Whenever possible, we will consider music-making locally, in and around Bloomington. Organized around case studies and broad themes, this course will explore the ways in which the musical traditions presented are shaped by and give shape to the social and cultural environments from which they come. Since different musical styles have different structures and meanings, we will learn new ways of listening to understand with greater clarity the significance that music and music making have for those who perform, listen, and otherwise engage with it. Mindfully listening to music means not just learning to hear characteristics of sound, but also learning to analyze and interpret different cultural approaches to music making and enjoyment.

Folk-E112 Black Music of Two Worlds
Instructor: Mellonee Burnim
TR 2:30-3:20pm
CASE A&H, GCC; GenEd A&H, World Cultures
Course # 31089

Lecture Location: Cedar Hall C102

An exploration of the relationships among musics of West and Central African people and their descendants in the U.S., Latin America, and the Caribbean.  Emphasis placed on the conceptual and aesthetic continuities between musical expression in Old and New World contexts—a uniformity which exists because of a shared African cultural ancestry. 

Folk-F121 World Arts & Cultures
SECOND 8 WEEKS
Instructor: Jason Jackson
TR 10:15am-12:30pm
CASE S&H, GCC; GenEd S&H, WC
Location: Classroom Office Building Room 203 (800 E 3rd St)

Zapotec weaver Marcos Bautista, Orthodox icon painter Father Jerome Sanderson, Norwegian rosemaling (a kind of decorative painting) artist Jan Boettcher, and Ukrainian-style egg dying artist Carol Powers—these are some of the talented people that you will meet and learn from—right here in Bloomington—in World Arts and Cultures. World Arts and Cultures is the course that brings the world to you—from Indonesian puppetry to Navajo weavings; from the use of art to combat HIV/AIDS in South Africa to the use of dance to remember tribal history among Native American groups in Oklahoma; from Japanese sushi to southern biscuits and gravy.

Surveying the customary arts of the world’s peoples offers a means of comprehending the human condition today. This course explores how culture is made manifest, especially in such media as landscapes, architecture, objects, expressive performances, and everyday practices. A rich sampling of the world’s arts and cultures, it also provides an introduction to the study of folklife and regional ethnology.

Folk-F131 Folklore in the United States
Instructor: Pravina Shukla
MW 12:20-1:10pm +discussion section
CASE A&H; GenEd A&H
Course # 10839

Lecture Location: Woodburn Hall 101

People from all over the world call the United States home. Some arrived centuries ago, others arrived a few years ago. Along with ambition and family, all of them bring with them their expressive culture. This class looks at contemporary cultural expressions in the United States by focusing on folklore, defined as creativity in everyday life. Through lectures, videos, slides, audio recordings and a few guest lectures, we explore folklore in the U.S. now, for example, by studying urban legends, personal narratives, tattoos, and car art. We understand the present by looking at the past, seeing European, African, Native American, and Asian influences on the architecture, folktales, food, and body art of the United States.

Folk-F141 Urban Legend
Instructor: Robert Dobler
MW 1:25-2:15pm +discussion section
CASE A&H; GenEd A&H
Course # 14367

Lecture Location: Woodburn Hall 101

Stories of Kentucky fried rats, poodles in a microwave, kidneys stolen for the human organ black market, and bizarre gang initiations, are examples of the popular narrative tradition of “urban legend”. Often macabre, fantastic, horrific and sometimes hilarious, urban legends are modern adaptations of much older stories told in daily discourse, and depicted in television, film and novels. This course explores the defining features of urban legend, their cultural history, themes and their role as cultural commentary, their cultural fascination and impact, and their popularity on the internet, in the news and in popular culture.

Folk-E151 Global Pop Music
Instructor: Alisha Lola Jones
MW 2:30-3:20pm +discussion section
CASE A&H, GCC; GenEd A&H, World Cultures
Course # 31090

Lecture Location: Woodburn Hall 101

Dominican merengue. Indie music in Bali. Ghanaian Hiplife. People around the world have created a rich and fascinating array of popular music styles. What do these musics sound like, and why? How might we analyze popular musics in order to better understand musicians’ motives, intentions, and creative processes? What roles do these musical styles play in movements for social change? This course is designed thematically to provide students with the tools to engage various forms of popular musical expression as social practice across diverse locations, media, and societies. Throughout the semester, students are expected to critically think about the participatory, presentational, and political components of music making; to listen to sonic elements that distinguish musical genres from one another; to articulate thoughtfully the ways in which musical activities construct identity; and to write persuasively about the role of pop musics in social life.

Folk-F252 Gender & Sexuality in Music
Instructor: Alisha Lola Jones
MW 4:00-5:15pm
CASE A&H; GenEd A&H
Course # 11231

Location: Classroom Office Building Room 203 (800 E 3rd St)

From women's music festivals to black gay ballroom culture, this course is designed to examine the roles of gender and sexuality in music scenes from various traditions, with an emphasis on African American musicians' contributions. Our objective is to think and write critically about the ways in which performers’ identities influence their cultural transmission, production, reception, and distribution of music and sound. We will also consider the extent to which gender and sexuality are intersectional attributes that are conveyed and interpreted differently depending on the socio-cultural context. Throughout the semester, we will listen to, view, attend, and analyze performances in an interdisciplinary manner, drawing on literature from ethnomusicology, musicology, performance, and gender studies to interpret the meanings musicians generate through multi-media presentations.

Folk-F252 Folklore & the Internet
Instructor: Robby Dobler
TR 4:00-5:15pm
CASE A&H; GenEd A&H
Course # 31086

Location: Woodburn Hall 005

Folklore has always been concerned with the transmission of traditional beliefs and behaviors among groups of people across space and through time. Technological innovations have consistently created opportunities to expand the study of folklore into new contexts as conventional notions of both the "folk" and "lore" have shifted and grown to accommodate changing media technologies. This course will explore the folklore of the internet, examining what it means to be part of an online community, how the web shapes the transmission of expressive culture, and the ethics of conducting fieldwork among a virtual folk. Our explorations will include legends of supernatural beings like Slender Man; memes and the phenomenon of going viral; humor and folk speech on the web; fan culture and community; and the folk uses social networking sites like Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Folk-F252 From Dance Halls to Carnivals and Revolutions! Popular Music in Latin America
SECOND 8 WEEKS

Instructor: Jennie Gubner
MW 11:00am-1:15pm
CASE A&H; GenEd A&H
Course # 36553

Location: Classroom Office Building Room 203 (800 E 3rd St)

This course meets 2nd 8 Weeks only. This interdisciplinary course examines popular music as a powerful cultural force in Latin America throughout the 20th and 21st centuries. By listening to music, watching films, and reading and discussing case studies by key Latin American music scholars, students will learn to think critically about popular music as a form of social life, an economic resource, a vehicle for resistance, and a tool for nation and identity building. Combining lecture, discussion, and independent research, we will explore topics ranging from music as a symbol of nationalism in the early Latin American film industries, to music as a form of political resistance during the dictatorships of the Southern Cone, to the transnational flow of commercial dance musics like salsa, cumbia, tango, and bachata and their ties to questions of race, class, and globalization. No prior musical experience necessary. 

Folk-F253 Foodways in America
Instructor: Brandon Barker
MW 9:30-10:45am
CASE S&H; GenEd S&H
Course # 12663

Location: 800 N Indiana Ave

Food expresses culture. Any Hoosier kitchen serves a pork tenderloin sandwich. Southern Creoles pride themselves on how many crawfish tails they can peel in under a minute; Texan chili masters can handle any amount of spicy heat; everyone knows the “best” crabcakes come from Maryland, and you haven’t even tried BBQ unless you’ve been to Memphis, TN!

Foodways refers to the folkloristic study of food. From baked turkey on Thanksgiving and hard-boiled eggs on Easter to Cajun Gumbo on Mardi Gras and wrapped Tamales on Christmas Eve, American Foodways are as ubiquitous as they are diverse. This course attends to both the widespread foodways associated with American festivities like birthdays, the 4th of July, and baseball and geographically and culturally specific foodways like a mess of Appalachian mustard greens or the choice between Chicago- or New York-style pizza. Taken as a whole, foodways in the United States reflect the Nation’s complicated mixture of simultaneously separate and intertwined aesthetic and cultural traditions. 

Folk-E295 Survey of Hip Hop
Instructor: Fernando Orejuela
MW 2:30-3:45pm
CASE A&H, DUS; GenEd A&H
Course # 8378

ABOVE CLASS is taught as a web-based course only, using BREEZE (Adobe Connect).

Above class MEETS IN A VIRTUAL CLASSROOM ON THE INTERNET FOR LECTURE 2 TIMES PER WEEK. The exams will be online using EXAMITY, an online proctoring APP.  If you are unable to use this APP we will schedule a campus exam site for the Midterm and Final Exams. The alternative face-to-face Midterm is scheduled for Saturday, October 10th, 1:00-2:15 pm in Woodburn Hall 100. The Final TBA.

Above class students must be enrolled at IUB in order to add this course. Course materials will be available on OnCourse the day before our first meeting.

If you have not been in an Adobe Connect class room before and are working from home, at minimum, do the first item (Test your computer) before the first class session and download the plug-in. If you use a campus cluster computer, those computers are Adobe compatible but you have to upload Flash everytime to optimize the class best.

This course examines rap music and hip hop culture as artistic and sociological phenomena with emphasis on historical, cultural, economic and political contexts. Discussions will include the co-existence of various hip hop styles, their appropriation by the music industry, and controversies resulting from the exploitation of hip hop music and culture as a commodity for national and global consumption.

Fernando Orejuela’s Rap and Hip Hop Culture (2015) will be our main textbook and articles will be made available to you in Canvas throughout the semester.

NOTE 1: The classroom does not FULLY support iPhone or iPads at present time but does work well with other tablets.

NOTE 2: Students should avoid Safari and Chrome– they are not IU supported browsers. I recommend Firefox for the virtual classroom and Canvas.

Folk-F305 Cultural Diversity in China
Instructor: Sue Tuohy
TR 2:30-3:45pm
CASE A&H, GCC
Section 31099: FOLK and EALC majors and minors and Chinese Flagship Students only. E-mail tuohys@indiana.edu for authorization.
Section 31101: Open to students from any department. No authorization needed.

Location: Woodburn Hall 104

This course introduces students to human and cultural diversity in contemporary China. Class topics will cover diverse forms of human affiliations, from ethnic, class, gender, gender, generational, regional, and linguistic to rural and urban and local and national groups. Although we will focus on modern China, issues will be contextualized in relation to Chinese history and interactions beyond the borders of China. We will explore the multiple meanings of Chineseness as well as concepts and expressions of individual and group identities. Among the broad questions to be addressed are: What is China? Who are Chinese? What is Chinese culture (and who says)?

Many class sessions will emphasize artistic and expressive forms (music, material culture, film, verbal genres, and tourism) and the roles they play in shaping and representing identities. Related cultural, linguistic, and heritage policies will be discussed. The course also will introduce theories and methods from Folklore and Ethnomusicology that can be put to use in our analysis of human diversity, representations, and performance. Graded components will include class preparation and participation, written assignments, quizzes, and a midterm and/or final exam.

This  course is cross-listed in EALC (and counts toward the EALC major).

Folk-F312 Irish Music & Culture
Instructor: David McDonald
MW 1:00-2:15pm
CASE A&H, GCC
Course # 14123

Location: Cedar Hall C118

This course introduces students to the history of Irish music and culture through a combination of lectures, discussions, and applied fieldworking activities.  Specifically, this course offers an introduction to the vocal and instrumental traditions of Irish music in the context of the Irish diaspora and other Celtic traditions.  Intended for undergraduate and graduate students in music, ethnomusicology, anthropology, area studies, and folklore this course brings together case studies on Irish music and culture from a wide variety of historical, analytical, and ethnographic sources.  Included in this course will be aspects of Irish culture and history, politics, poetry, dance, and storytelling.  Based on course readings, lectures, films, and live music performances/demonstrations students will trace the development of Irish music and dance from indigenous rural contexts to the international stage, investigating issues of religion, politics, nationalism, and globalization.

Folk-F315 Tango Lab I: Tango History & Culture through Performance
Instructor: Jennie Gubner
CASE A&H, GCC
Course # 35488

Location: 800 N Indiana Ave
Authorization required: contact jgubner@gmail.com
This course has a $50 fee.

This class was cancelled.

Folk-F351 Folklore of the South
Instructor: Brandon Barker
MW 4:00-5:15pm

CASE A&H, DUS
Course # 12892
Location: Woodburn Hall 002

The Blues? Grits and collard greens? A Texas two-step? Mardi Gras? Country music? Barbecue? Twangy accents? Key Lime Pie? Evangelicalism? The Mason-Dixon line? What makes the South southern? The South, nicknamed Dixieland, is frequently defined as the 11 states of the North American southeast—stretching from Maryland down to the Florida Keys and out to western Texas. This course surveys a range of folkloric traditions practiced in these southern states, including folk speech, festival celebrations, foodways, folk music, folk religion, and others. Considered together, the folk traditions from disparate geographic and cultural spaces of the broadly defined South present a rich, complex picture of Dixie that allows us to question our Southern assumptions.

Folk-F356 Latino Folklore
Instructor: Mintzi Martinez-Rivera
MW 2:30-3:45pm
CASE A&H, DUS
Course # 11074

Location: Ballantine Hall 344

Latino communities in the United States are as culturally rich and diverse as their countries of origin. The United States, moreover, provides a platform for the proliferation, transformation, and adaptation of cultural practices. Therefore, the study of Latino folklore in the United States offers an amazing opportunity to analyze how communities are maintained even when they are in constant fluctuation, and how cultural expressions play a central part in the continuity and transformation of community.

This course cannot be inclusive of all US Latinos, but we will study a wide array of cultural manifestations—oral traditions, music, festivals, dance, material culture, healing and spirituality—while also paying attention to wider debates concerning migration, gender, nationalism, and identity.  The course will begin with an overview of the study of folklore and of Latino Studies. The remainder of the course will be divided into five main themes—migration, gender, nationalism, and identity and the interrelation between them—and how different cultural practices and traditional expressive forms help express, negotiate, transform, and maintain Latino communities in the United States.

Folk-F356 Myth, Cosmos, & Healing in Latin America
Instructor: John McDowell
MW 2:30-3:45pm
CASE A&H, DUS
Course # 32965

Location: 501 N Park Ave

Latino communities in the United States are as culturally rich and diverse as their countries of origin. The United States, moreover, provides a platform for the proliferation, transformation, and adaptation of cultural practices. Therefore, the study of Latino folklore in the United States offers an amazing opportunity to analyze how communities are maintained even when they are in constant fluctuation, and how cultural expressions play a central part in the continuity and transformation of community.

Folk-F358 Music in Judaism
Instructor: Judah Cohen
MW 2:30-3:45pm
CASE A&H
Course # 31107

Location: Cedar Hall C118

In this course, we will explore the variety of ways people have used music to describe, inscribe, symbolize and editorialize the Jewish experience: from biblical times, to cantorial music, to Israeli popular music, American Jewish hip-hop and beyond.  Although we will cover much of our material in chronological order, this course offers more than just a survey of “Jewish music history.”  Rather, music will serve as our window into questions of religious, ethnic, national and historical identity from biblical times to the present. A basic familiarity with Judaism, music history, and/or musical terminology is helpful for the course, but by no means required. All translations will be provided, and all musical analysis will be taught and explained thoroughly.

Folk-F360 The Beauty of Indiana Folk Art
College of Arts & Sciences Themester Course
Instructor: Jon Kay
TR 11:15am-12:30pm
CASE A&H, DUS
Course # 31106

Location: Mathers Museum

It is said that “beauty is in the eye of the beholder,” but is beauty an objective standard or a cultural construction? This will be our guiding question as we survey a variety of expressive forms in Indiana, and explore the aesthetic choices manifested in traditional arts. From Amish buggies and Miami beadwork to limestone carvings and rag rugs, students will study the relationship between individual creativity and community values. In addition to traditional class lectures and seminar discussions, folk artists will visit our class and provide insights into a variety of Indiana’s folk art practices and the aesthetic values that shape them. While this course will familiarize students with several genres of traditional arts, they will also gain an understanding of the history of folk art scholarship and the methods used to identify, document, and present folk arts in public settings. As a culmination to the class, students will research a folk artist and produce an exhibition poster that will be displayed at the Mathers Museum of World Cultures. 

Folk-F364 Children's Folklore
Instructor: Fernando Orejuela
TR 1:00-2:15pm
CASE A&H, DUS
Course # 12005

Location: Ballantine Hall 105

This course will focus on the informal processes through which children negotiate childhood and as a means of understanding how children use folklore in their everyday lives to construct the status quo as well as resist it. This course requires that you do some fieldwork with children, emphasizing experience and service learning. Service-learning combines the service ethic of volunteerism with critical thinking skills and academic knowledge. The final paper will combine library research with the 10-week service learning lab (a.k.a. 1-2 hours fieldwork + community volunteerism) with our partners at the Boys and Girls Clubs, and Girls, Inc. in Bloomington.

Folk-F401 Methods & Theories
Instructor: Fernando Orejuela
MW 11:15am-12:30pm
CASE S&H
Course # 10172

Location: Classroom Office Building Room 272 (800 E 3rd St)

FOLK majors and minors only. E-mail mmelhous@indiana.edu to obtain online authorization.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to principle theories and methods in the two fields composing our department, Folklore and Ethnomusicology. Folklorists and ethnomusicologists study the meanings of expressive forms in the everyday lives of individuals and their roles in society. Our two fields share a common focus on forms of artistic performance and expressive culture. Our scholarship also demonstrates a shared interest in the study of people and their artistic productions. Our research aims to contribute to the understanding of social processes, artistic practices, and human creativity.

We will engage in discussions on the following: (1) examining the convergences and divergences of the two fields; (2) their histories and current research paradigms; (3) basic concepts such as community, tradition, genre, performance; (4) research methods; and (5) the issues associated with presenting/representing people in the public setting.

Required textbooks:
1. Bauman, Richard (ed.). 1992. Folklore, Cultural Performances, and Popular Entertainments: A Communications-Centered Handbook. New York: Oxford University Press.
2. Ruth Stone. 2007. Theory for Ethnomusicology. New York: Prentice Hall.

Folk-F404 Memoirs & Life Histories in Ethnomusicology
Instructor: Ruth Stone
M 9:00-11:30am
CASE A&H
Course # 13684

Location: Classroom Office Building Room 102 (800 E 3rd St)

Life histories in ethnomusicology center on the varying perspectives of a performer or scholar over time.  They focus on an individual life as practiced, as performed, and as critiqued, drawing on individual memory as well as collectively constructed history.  Life histories are woven from ethnographic as well as archival research.  This class will examine life histories as a genre of writing and analysis.  Students will have an opportunity to both explore the genre in general and to examine particular life histories in ethnomusicology. 

Textbooks:
Tell Me True:  Memoir, History, and Writing a Life. 2008.  Patrician Hempl and Elaine Tyler May (eds). St. Paul, MN: Borealis Books.

Travels with Frances Densmore: Her Life, Work, and Legacy in Native American Studies. 2015. Joan M. Jensen and Michelle Wick Patterson (eds).   Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

Fela: The Life and Times of an African Musician.  2000.  Michael E. Veal.   Philadelphia:  Temple University Press.

“The Voice of Egypt”:  Um Kulthum, Arabic Song, and Egyptian Society in the Twentieth Century. Virginia Danielson.  1997.  Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Songprints:  The Musical Experience of Five Shoshone Women.  Judith Vander. 1988.  Urbana:  University of Illinois Press.

Writing in the San/d: Autoethnography among Indigenous Southern Africans. Kenyan Tomaselli, Lauren Dyall, et. al. (eds). 2007. Lanham, MD: Altamira Press.

Folk-F497 Advanced Seminar
Instructor: Sue Tuohy
TR 1:00-2:15pm
CASE S&H
Course # 6108

Location: Classroom Office Building Room 102 (800 E 3rd St)

Priority is given to FOLK majors. Authorization is required for this course-contact mmelhous@indiana.edu for authorization.

This is the capstone seminar for majors in the Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology (other students should contact the instructor for approval to enroll in the course).  The course provides an opportunity for students: 1) to consolidate and build upon knowledge learned through undergraduate coursework and experiences; 2) to apply that knowledge in a sustained project of significant intellectual and/or practical value to be completed this semester; and 3) to prepare for their futures.

Students will complete a common core of readings on topics such as basic concepts in folklore/ethnomusicology and techniques for research, writing, and other modes of presentation.  The bulk of the semester's work, however, will be specific to each student's individual project and needs.  Students also will complete a portfolio of their work to date, with an eye toward future educational and career plans.  Class members will meet together in a seminar setting to discuss projects, portfolios, resumes, and relevant theories and methods. And they will work in collaboration to support and improve upon their work.

As in all classes, the course will help students to continue to refine skills in communication, research, critical thinking, and scholarship--including research methods, conceptualization, evaluation and use of relevant sources, and writing.  With an emphasis on the work of synthesis and reflection, the primary aim for F497 is for students to emerge from this course--and from their experience in the department and at IU--feeling competent in their chosen field(s) and confident that the knowledge they have acquired can be transformed into worthwhile endeavors in the near and distant future.

Cross-Listed Courses

COLL-C103 Music, War, & Peace
MW 9:05-9:55am +discussion section
CASE A&H; GenEd A&H
Course # 10216

Lecture Location: Ballantine Hall 109

This course is designed to explore the dynamics of music, social conflict, and conflict resolution. Over the course of the semester we will investigate the capacities of music to enact fundamental aspects of identity, self, and other. From these initial discussions we will then consider a variety of case studies wherein music was employed as a tool for generating and sustaining war, violence, and other forms of social conflict. Following this, we will then survey cross-cultural moments where music played an essential role in generating and sustaining peace, conflict resolution, and other humanitarian movements. At the heart of these discussions, however, will be an investigation into the role of expressive culture in reflecting, generating, and sustaining political and other social movements. Our meetings will take many forms, extending beyond the classroom to include discussions, film screenings, cultural activities, and performance demonstrations.