Skip to main content
Indiana University Bloomington

HomeFolklore InstituteEthnomusicology Institute

Undergraduate Course Offerings

Spring 2014 Undergraduate Courses

F101 Introduction to Folklore
11:15A-12:05P Tusday/Thursday + discussion section
Instructor: Brandon Barker
Location: Woodburn Hall 100
Course #: 18131

CASE A&H; GenEd A&H. Folklore is alive and inspires the choices we make every day: how we communicate, what foods we eat, what games we play, what stories we tell, how we interpret the world around us. Folklore reflects our values, our prejudices, our fears, and our desires. The practices, beliefs, and objects that constitute  folklore are so intrinsic to our daily lives that they are often overlooked in other disciplines that study human culture, but every culture has folklore and we are all part of the folk. In this course we will consider the role folklore plays in the lives of people around the world.

F111 World Muisc & Culture
12:20P-1:10P Monday/Wednesday + discussion section
Instructor: Javier Leon
Location: Fine Arts 015
Course #: 18137

CASE A&H; GenEd A&H, WC. This course examines a variety of musical traditions from across the globe. Taught from an ethnomusicological perspective, music is explored as complex cultural expression, intensely invested with social, artistic, economic and political meanings. This course seeks to advance knowledge of not only what happens in musical performance, but why. More than mere entertainment, or simply notes on a printed page, music comes alive through an understanding of the people who create and express it.

F111 World Music & Culture
4:00P-5:15P Monday/Wednesday

Instructor: Allan Mugishagwe
Location: 800 N Indiana Ave
Course #: 32797

CASE A&H; GenEd A&H, WC. This course examines a variety of musical traditions from across the globe.  Taught from an ethnomusicological perspective, music is explored as complex cultural expression, intensely invested with social, artistic, economic and political meanings.  This course seeks to advance knowledge not only of what happens in musical performance, but why.  More than mere entertainment or simply notes on a printed page, music comes alive through an understanding of the people who create and express it.  Musical meanings can change over time, and the same music can convey different meaning to different participants in different contexts.  Nuanced interpretations of music often require the investigation of its link to race, gender and even class.  Is music then a universal language?  F111 explores this pervasive concept.  Through the analysis of audio and video recordings, as well as carefully selected reading materials and field experiences, students will develop greater understanding of the role of music in their own lives, as well as the lives of “others” both near and far.  Formal Training in Western Music is not required! 

F121 World Arts & Culture
11:15A-12:05P Monday/Wednesday + discussion section
Instructor: Pravina Shukla
Location: Woodburn Hall 101
Course #: 22173

Fulfills CASE S&H; GenEd S&H, WC. This course will explore traditional arts, looking at different mediums of artistic expression, and at a variety of cultural contexts around the world and within the United States. Each week we will travel to a different region of the world where artistic expression – as material culture -- enables people to present themselves as members of groups and as individuals. Throughout the semester, we will seek to understand the myriad ways in which the arts are fundamental to human existence, used as a vehicle for the expression of faith, culture, aesthetics, and community. Class topics will include festivals and celebrations, pottery, food, tattoos and body art, textile arts, and costumes.

F205 Folklore in Video and Film
1:00P-2:15PM Monday/Wednesday
Instructor: Michael Foster
Location: Ballantine Hall 141
Course #: 27158

Fulfills CASE A&H. This course explores how film and folklore inform each other. Since the advent of film technology, numerous documentaries have been produced to examine all sorts of folklife and practices—everything from festivals and rituals to foodways and graffiti. And because folklore is inseparable from everyday life, dramatic movies, popular cinema, and television productions inevitably draw on folklore for the construction of characters and storyline. Indeed, specifically folkloric themes and genres—including urban legends, myths, folktales, and supernatural beliefs—have long been favorites subjects of feature films. This course considers both ethnographic films depicting folkloric practices as well as popular movies and television shows inspired by folkloric topics or narrative forms. We will examine the way film not only portrays folklore but also functions as a medium for transmitting folk beliefs and worldviews, and even for engendering new folklore. Throughout the course, we will question boundaries between folklore and popular culture, and investigate how new media and the Internet change traditional understandings of expressive culture. Students will view films and other popular media with a critical eye, not only seeking connections to folklore but also analyzing these connections for their wider socio-cultural meanings. Specific topics and films will be selected from a range of time periods, genres and national contexts. 

Although we will not watch a film every week, attendance at screenings is mandatory and students should make sure they are available during screening times.

F230 Music in Social Movements
11:15A-12:30P Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor: Sue Tuohy
Location: Woodburn Hall 004

Course #: 30306

CASE S&H; GenEd S&H. “You say you want a revolution”--or do you sing it instead?  In this course, we will explore ways people use music in social movements that are aimed at changing the world, or at least people’s minds and/or behaviors. Music plays a role in social movements throughout the world, whether in human rights and environmental campaigns or political and cultural revolutions. We will study examples of different types of movements of groups in different parts of the world (including in U.S., China, and several countries in Africa and Latin America), as well as examples of global movements. We also will explore concepts about the transformative power both of music and of organized groups of people as we consider the term 'movement' in at least two senses: 1) in the physical sense--movement as organized, collective action that often involves the movement of bodies; and 2) in the emotional sense of "moving."  These two senses combine in movements that are intent on mobilizing people for change and arousing people to take action.

Among the primary objectives of the class are to understand and analyze:
1. Relations between music, society, and politics;
2. The ways people use music as to organize people and to represent their identities
3. The role of music in disseminating messages and in creating or maintaining community; and
4. The idea of music as an agent of social change.

The course emphasizes the study of the arts in human life and in cross-cultural approaches to the study of expressive culture. Students will learn methods for analyzing musical performance and social discourse. And students will find opportunities to pursue their interests in particular world areas (including Bloomington) and topics through flexible research assignments.  Graded components will include class preparation and participation, written assignments, quizzes, and a midterm and/or final exam.

The course is designed for students in the Folklore and Ethnomusicology as well as those interested in social movements, human rights, politics, and the arts in society. Formal music training is not required.

F235 Folklore and Literature
1:00P-2:15P Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor: Kate Horigan
Location: 800 N Indiana Ave
Course #: 30310

CASE A&H; GenEd A&H. From Gilgamesh to Brer Rabbit, from Nathaniel Hawthorne to  Leslie Marmon Silko, folk narrative and literary texts have a complex relationship. This course aims to explore the shifting connections between “folklore” (traditional cultural practices including verbal arts, customs, and material culture) and “literature.” We will examine storytelling in across the borders of the oral and the written. We will begin by considering a wide range of genres including epics, folktales, and legends, and we will identify and evaluate processes of cross-genre movement: borrowing, stealing, reinforcing, undermining, and so on. We will conclude with contemporary examples of personal experience narrative and related genres such as life history and autobiography, exploring for example how oral testimony is related to memoirs and literary hoaxes. Throughout the course, we will focus our attention on issues of genre, context, authority, and cultural values.

F252 Global Pop Music
1:00P-2:15P Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor: Daniel Reed
Location: Ballantine Hall 141
Course #: 30315

CASE A&H; GenEd A&H. Congolese rumba. Irish punk. Jewish hip hop. Indian disco. People around the world have created a rich and fascinating array of popular music styles. What do these musics sound like, and why? How might we analyze popular musics in order to better understand musicians’ motives, intentions, and creative processes? What roles do these musical styles play in movements for social change? In revolutions?  As markers of generational, ethnic, racial, religious, gender, and other identities?  How do meanings associated with popular musics change over time?  What roles do economics, globalization, transnational trends, and the music industry (including the “world music” industry) play in shaping sound and culture?  Structured thematically, this course will compare and contrast particular popular musics and explore what the study of these musics can reveal to us about the people who create and use them.

F253 Mythology and Culture
4:00P-5:15P Monday/Wednesday
Instructor: Greg Schrempp
Location: Woodburn Hall 204

Course #: 25236

Class for Hutton Honors students and FOLK majors only.

FOLK preparatory majors or Folk minors interested in the class contact
gschremp@indiana.edu for possible authorization.

CASE S&H; GenEd S&H. The term “mythology” carries a number of meanings, including ancient stories associated with rituals, potent symbols, and images with an uncanny power to stick in our minds and shape our worldviews.  In many usages, “mythology” also carries the connotation of the temporally, spatially, and/or geographically distant.  In this course, we will look at examples of such “distant” mythologies, including stories, rituals, and symbols embraced by the ancient Greeks, Pacific Islanders, and Native Americans (who, though spatially proximate, are regarded by many Americans as culturally distant).

Some scholars, however, think that it is too confining, if not prejudicial, to limit the concept of “myth” to such distant societies and cultures.  In the second part of the course, we will consider the idea that mythology is to be found in many forms of modern mass-culture, such as film, television, advertising, and popular iconography.  Throughout, we will consider the ways in which mythology intersects with culture more broadly and the ways it functions within society.

Anthropologists Bronislaw Malinowski’s “Myth in Primitive Psychology” will be the focal work for the first half of the course; literary and culture critic Roland Barthes’ “Mythologies” for the second.
Readings will be supplemented with visual materials.  The workload for this class will be average.  Grades will be based on participation, an in-class presentation, two short essays, and a concluding essay to be written during the final exam period.

F256 The Supernatural and Folklore
2:30P-3:20P Monday/Wednesday + discussion section
Instructor: Kate Horigan
Location: Woodburn Hall 101

Course #: 27163

CASE A&H, GCC. Ghosts, vampires, werewolves and other supernatural beings are immensely popular and appear in contemporary novels, video games, films, and other media. Belief in the supernatural is explored in television shows that detail the exploits of “ghost hunters” or probe the possibility of extraterrestrial encounters. Statistics gathered by Gallop Poll indicate that an extremely large percentage of North Americans not only believe in the supernatural, but in fact, believe that they themselves have had a supernatural or paranormal experience. “Evidence” of the supernatural is, in this sense, all around us. What do people find so compelling about the supernatural? And why, as folklorists, should we concern ourselves with the study of supernatural tradition? This course examines the many forms of supernatural belief traditions that people express through traditional genres and through popular media. A key concept is the issue of belief: in this case, the conviction that experiences of the supernatural are genuine, and have important implications about life after death, the existence of spirits, magic, and related topics. Through specific case studies, we will explore the forms supernatural tradition and belief take in everyday life, and develop models for understanding how supernatural belief relates to other aspects of worldview and culture.

E295 Survey of Hip-Hop
2:30P-3:45P Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor: Fernando Orejuela
Online

CASE A&H, DUS; GenEd A&H.

Above class MEETS IN A VIRTUAL CLASSROOM ON THE INTERNET FOR LECTURE 2 TIMES PER WEEK.

ABOVE CLASS is taught as a web-based course only, using BREEZE (Adobe Connect).

Only meets on campus 2 times for the Midterm and Final Exams. The Midterm is scheduled for Saturday, October 8th, 10:00 am. Location TBD. The Final TBA.

Above class students must be enrolled at IUB in order to add this course. Course materials will be available on OnCourse the day before our first meeting.

If you have not been in a BREEZE (Adobe Connect) class room before and are working from home, at minimum, do the first item (Test your computer) before the first class session and download the plug-in. If you use a campus cluster computer, those computers are Breeze/Adobe compatible.

This course examines rap music and hip hop culture as artistic and sociological phenomena with emphasis on historical, cultural, economic and political contexts. Discussions will include the co-existence of various hip hop styles, their appropriation by the music industry, and controversies resulting from the exploitation of hip hop music and culture as a commodity for national and global consumption. Class will meet 2 times on campus for the midterm and the final exams.

Cheryl Keyes's Rap Music and Street Consciousness will be our main textbook but articles will be made available to you in ONCOURSE RESOURCES throughout the semester.

NOTE 1: The classroom does not support iPhone or iPads at present time but does work well with Droid.

NOTE 2: Students should not use Safari with Oncourse - it is not a supported browser. I recommend Firefox for the virtual classroom and ONCOURSE.

F301 Ugandan Music & Dance Ensemble
11:15A-12:30P Monday/Wednesday
Instructor: Allan Mugishagwe
Location: 800 N Indiana Ave

Course #: 30332

CASE A&H, GCC. Class will have a $50 course fee. This course introduces students to Ugandan musical and dance traditions through a combination of applied music making and discussions.  Specifically, students will learn to perform selected practices (songs, dances, instruments) from Uganda. Students will be expected to participate as both performers and researchers, gaining proficiency in performing this repertoire of musical/dance traditions as well as learning their relationships with larger patterns of Ugandan social and cultural behavior.  In addition, students will be required to read literature on other Ugandan performance traditions not represented in the course repertoire. The aim here is such that your knowledge of this nation’s musical/dance practices is not limited to those we learn and practice in class meetings. The instructor of this course learned Ugandan performance traditions by means of oral transmission and demonstration, and hence that is the way they will be taught in this course.

F301 Ugandan Music & Dance Ensemble
2:30P-3:45P Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor: Allan Mugishagwe
Location: 800 N Indiana Ave

Course #: 34137

CASE A&H, GCC. Class will have a $50 course fee. This course introduces students to Ugandan musical and dance traditions through a combination of applied music making and discussions.  Specifically, students will learn to perform selected practices (songs, dances, instruments) from Uganda. Students will be expected to participate as both performers and researchers, gaining proficiency in performing this repertoire of musical/dance traditions as well as learning their relationships with larger patterns of Ugandan social and cultural behavior.  In addition, students will be required to read literature on other Ugandan performance traditions not represented in the course repertoire. The aim here is such that your knowledge of this nation’s musical/dance practices is not limited to those we learn and practice in class meetings. The instructor of this course learned Ugandan performance traditions by means of oral transmission and demonstration, and hence that is the way they will be taught in this course.

F301 Ghanaian Music, Drum, & Dance
7:00P-9:30P Monday
Instructor: Bernard Woma
Location: 800 N Indiana
Ave
Course #: 20732

CASE A&H, GCC.

Above class requires permission of instructor: contact bwoma@indiana.edu for authorization.

Meets with Folk-F609. Meets at 800 N. Indiana Ave. Class will require a $50 course fee.

This course is an introduction to African performing arts. Students will be introduced to practical African drumming and dancing as well as learn the performance aspects of these musical genres. The class material will focus mainly on Ghanaian drumming, gyil (xylophone music) and some musical traditions of West Africa. With emphasis on hands-on experience in drumming, singing and dancing, students will also learn the history and social contexts in which these performance genres are organized. There will be a short lecture/discussion at the end of each session on the musical traditions covered in class. Students will be evaluated on how actively they participate in class and their understanding of the performance aspects of the various genres. There will be a performance at the end of the semester and students are required to be part of the performance. Previous music and dance experience is welcome but not required. All materials will be taught orally and through demonstrations.

F312 Irish Music and Culture
9:30A-10:45A     Monday/Wednesday
Instructor: David McDonald
Location: Cedar Hall AC C102

Course #: 30336

Above class meets with Folk-F635.

CASE A&H, GCC. This course introduces students to the history of Irish music and culture through a combination of lectures, discussions, and applied fieldworking activities.  Specifically, this course offers an introduction to the vocal and instrumental traditions of Irish music in the context of the Irish diaspora and other Celtic traditions.  Intended for undergraduate and graduate students in music, ethnomusicology, anthropology, area studies, and folklore this course brings together case studies on Irish music and culture from a wide variety of historical, analytical, and ethnographic sources.  Included in this course will be aspects of Irish culture and history, politics, poetry, dance, and storytelling.  Based on course readings, lectures, films, and live music performances/demonstrations students will trace the development of Irish music and dance from indigenous rural contexts to the international stage, investigating issues of religion, politics, nationalism, and globalization.

F315 Caribbean Arts & Cultures
11:15A-12:30P Monday/Wednesday
Instructor: Steve Stuempfle
Location: 501 N Park
Course #: 22324

CASE A&H, GCC. This course will explore traditional artistic creativity in a variety of Anglophone, Hispanophone, and Francophone countries in the Caribbean. Our primary goal will be to understand how verbal expression, music, dance, and visual arts have been central to the formation of Caribbean societies and to the representation of these societies in the wider world. Among the many art forms we will consider are Orisha (Santería) traditions and popular dance music in Cuba; Vodou traditions, Rara festivity, and roots music in Haiti; Carnival and East Indian festivals in Trinidad; Junkanoo processions in the Bahamas; reggae and dancehall in Jamaica; and Puerto Rican casitas in New York City.

We will examine the styles and significance of these and other art forms in their various historical and social contexts. At the same time, we will employ a comparative perspective to identify broader patterns in Caribbean creativity, aesthetics, spirituality, and social change. Throughout the course, we will consider how artistic expression is interrelated with processes of colonialism, social stratification, creolization, urbanization, nationalism, and decolonization.

Readings for this course are selected from the fields of folklore studies, cultural anthropology, art history, ethnomusicology, and literary studies. Class lectures and discussions will be accompanied by a wide range of visual images, video clips, and audio recordings. No previous knowledge of the Caribbean is required for the course. However, students must demonstrate a serious commitment to studying the Caribbean as a central site of modern world history and to understanding artistic communication as a critical component of Caribbean life.

F315 South American Performance & Culture: Protest Music
7:00P-9:30P Wednesday
Instructor: Javier Leon
Location: 800 N Indiana Ave
Course #: 27103

Above course meets with F638.

CASE A&H, GCC. This performance-based course introduces students to a variety of folk and popular music traditions associated with social and protest movements the South American region.  The course will cover rural and urban musics from Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Peru, Bolivia and Uruguay and in the process learn about the important role that music and musicians have had in building community, provide social commentary, and challenge authoritarian rule.  The course will be a combination of live performance workshop, classroom lectures, take-home reading and writing assignments, and an end of the semester group research project designed to about the rich history and social importance of protest music in South America.  Emphasis will also be given to the development of aural skills, learning the repertoire by ear, and the use of local performance practice techniques.  Note: Because of the performance component in this class, students are expected to have some basic musical performance skills.  Interested students must contact Prof. León (jfleon@indiana.edu) and make an appointment to have their musical skill assessed before they are given permission to enroll in the class.

E345 Hip-Hop Music & Culture
2:30P-3:45P Monday/Wednesday
Instructor: Fernando Orejuela
Location: Woodburn Hall 002
Course #: 30297

Above class meets with AAAD-A345 and LATS-L398.

CASE A&H, DUS.  This seminar course will ask questions about the role of hip hop culture in contemporary American society. We will also explore recent debates about mainstreaming an African American/African Diasporic musical art form, the role of Latino participation, the role and responsibility of the artist, as well as the concept of tradition, creativity and the emerging scholarship on hip hop. Unlike the survey course, which takes a more historical approach to the study of hip hop, we will examine hip hop as a cultural movement with complex cultural, social and political ties to the past, present, and future of African America and the African diaspora. We will address issues in hip hop as opposed to a chronology and delve into the theoretical notions and application of “performance.”

This course requires the use of a password-protected website: www.indiana.edu/~hiphop . Only students enrolled in the course will have access to the website. You can access the site using your IU username and password starting on the first day of class.

F354 From Juke Joint to Choir Loft
9:05A-9:55A Monday/Wednesday/Friday
Instructor: Mellonee Burnim
Location: Ballantine Hall 016
Course #: 27187

Above class meets with AAAD-A399.

CASE A&H, DUS. From slavery to the present, debates have raged among scholars and practitioners concerning the lines of demarcation between sacred and secular forms of African American music.  Whether it was slaves who danced their Christianity in the invisible church or the multi- platinum-selling gospel artist Kirk Franklin whose recordings are just as likely to surface on Billboard’s r&b chart as on its list of top gospel, or Richard Penniman, (better known as ‘Little Richard”) who three-times renounced a career in popular music to perform gospel instead,  the history of African American music is replete with artists and repertoire which challenge conventional Judeo-Christian musical and aesthetic values.  Utilizing an ethnomusicological perspective, which foregrounds the significance of culture in the formation and expression of musical values, this course will explore those inter- and intra-cultural dynamics which define the sacred/secular continuum in African American musics.

F356 Latino Youth and Urban Folklore
2:30P-3:45P Monday/Wednesday
Instructor: Mintzi Martinez-Rivera
Location: Woodburn Hall 007
Course #: 26597

Above class meets with LATS-L 398.

CASE A&H, DUS. Through this course we will question two wide spread stereotypes: (1) that young people tend to reject and eventually forget their culture, and (2) that folklore does not exist in urban settings. On the contrary by studying graffiti, lowriding, gangs, surfers, quebradores, among other cultural manifestations, we will study different folklore traditions performed by young people in urban settings in order to demonstrate the active participation of young people in creating, negotiating, transforming the culture and community where they live.   

This course will be inclusive of the diverse traditions of US Latinos, and will allow the study of a wide array of cultural manifestations—oral traditions, music, festivals, dance, material culture, healing and spirituality.  We will also pay attention to important issues such as migration, gender, nationality, and individual and group identity.  The course will begin with an overview and major themes in the field of Folklore and of Latino Studies. The remainder of the course will be divided into five sections—migration, gender, nationality, and identity and the interrelation between them. The goal of the class is to explore how young urban Latino men and women through different cultural practices and traditional-expressive forms help to negotiate, transform, and maintain Latino communities in the United States.

F364 Children¹s Folklore
4:00P-5:15P Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor: Brandon Barker
Location: 501 N Park Ave

Course #: 27193

CASE A&H, DUS. Everyone’s played patty-cake, and who doesn’t enjoy a good game of hop-scotch? But, do you remember playing Light as a Feather, Stiff as a Board? Do you know what actually is grosser than gross? From the games of the playground to the secret, scary play that happens behind closed doors, this course will examine the full range of children’s folklore.

F401 Methods and Theories
11:15A-12:30P Tuesday/Thursday
Instructor: Fernando Orejuela
Location: 510 N Fess Ave
Course #: 22345

Above class priority given to majors and minors. Contact mmelhous@indiana.edu to obtain online authorization.

CASE S&H. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to principle theories and methods in the two fields composing our department, Folklore and Ethnomusicology. Folklorists and ethnomusicologists study the meanings of expressive forms in the everyday lives of individuals and their roles in society. Our two fields share a common focus on forms of artistic performance and expressive culture. Our scholarship also demonstrates a shared interest in the study of people and their artistic productions. Our research aims to contribute to the understanding of social processes, artistic practices, and human creativity.

We will engage in discussions on the following: (1) examining the convergences and divergences of the two fields; (2) their histories and current research paradigms; (3) basic concepts such as community, tradition, genre, performance; (4) research methods; and (5) the issues associated with presenting/representing people in the public setting.

Required textbooks:
1. Bauman, Richard (ed.). 1992. Folklore, Cultural Performances, and Popular Entertainments: A Communications-Centered Handbook. New York: Oxford University Press.
2. Ruth Stone. 2007. Theory for Ethnomusicology. New York: Prentice Hall.

F420 American Country Music
1:00P-2:15P Monday/Wednesday
Instructor: Brandon Barker
Location: 800 N Indiana Ave
Course #: 30340

CASE A&H. Jimmie Rodgers, Gene Autry, Dolly Parton, George Jones, Johnny Cash, Loretta Lynn, Garth Brooks, Shania Twain, Blake Shelton, and Miranda Lambert. American Country Music's ability to create superstar performers for the better part of a century is undeniable. This course will survey Country Music's major performers and important historical moments while also considering the genre's folk roots in Appalachian music, southern blues music, and southwestern swing.