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Spring 2016 Undergraduate Course Offerings

Folk-F101 Introduction to Folklore
Instructor: Brandon Barker
MW 11:15am-12:05pm +discussion section
CASE A&H; GenEd A&H
Lecture Course #
4815

Folklore is alive and inspires the choices we make every day: how we communicate, what foods we eat, what games we play, what stories we tell, how we interpret the world around us. Folklore reflects our values, our prejudices, our fears, and our desires. The practices, beliefs, and objects that constitute  folklore are so intrinsic to our daily lives that they are often overlooked in other disciplines that study human culture, but every culture has folklore and we are all part of the folk. In this course we will consider the role folklore plays in the lives of people around the world.

Folk-F101 Introduction to Folklore
Instructor: Robby Dobler
TR 10:10-11:00am +discussion section
CASE A&H; GenEd A&H
Lecture Course # 15292

Folklore is alive and inspires the choices we make every day: how we communicate, what foods we eat, what games we play, what stories we tell, how we interpret the world around us. Folklore reflects our values, our prejudices, our fears, and our desires. The practices, beliefs, and objects that constitute  folklore are so intrinsic to our daily lives that they are often overlooked in other disciplines that study human culture, but every culture has folklore and we are all part of the folk. In this course we will consider the role folklore plays in the lives of people around the world.

Folk-F111 World Music & Culture
Instructor: Rebecca Dirksen
TR 11:15am-12:05pm +discussion section
CASE A&H; GenEd A&H, WC
Lecture Course # 4821

This introductory survey course engages students in a broad overview of selected musical cultures from around the world, focusing on examples from Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Europe. Whenever possible, we will consider music-making locally, in and around Bloomington. Organized around case studies and broad themes, this course will explore the ways in which the musical traditions presented are shaped by and give shape to the social and cultural environments from which they come. Since different musical styles have different structures and meanings, we will learn new ways of listening to understand with greater clarity the significance that music and music making have for those who perform, listen, and otherwise engage with it. Mindfully listening to music means not just learning to hear characteristics of sound, but also learning to analyze and interpret different cultural approaches to music making and enjoyment.

Folk-F111 World Music & Culture
Instructor: Alisha Lola Jones
MW 11:15am-12:30pm
CASE A&H; GenEd A&H, WC
Course # 15296

This course is designed to provide students with the tools to engage various forms of musical expression as social practice across diverse locations, media, and societies. A primary goal is to problematize “world music” as a homogenous category by considering its meaning in social, economic, political and creative spheres of music as social life. We will re-consider the ways in which this category can incorporate numerous musical experiences so as not to regulate such practices to a realm for “the other” or “foreign.” This course will explore the work of key figures within ethnomusicology and the manner with which they analyze music in the social lives of the people with which they work. Throughout the semester, students are expected to critically think about the participatory, presentational, and political components of music making; to listen to sonic elements that distinguish musical genres from one another; to articulate thoughtfully the ways in which musical activities construct identity; and to write persuasively about the role of music in social life.​

Folk-F121 World Arts & Cultures
Instructor: Pravina Shukla
MW 12:20-1:10pm +discussion section
CASE S&H, GCC; GenEd S&H, WC
Lecture Course # 29786

This course will explore traditional arts, looking at different mediums of artistic expression, and at a variety of cultural contexts around the world and within the United States. Each week we will travel to a different region of the world where artistic expression – as material culture -- enables people to present themselves as members of groups and as individuals. Throughout the semester, we will seek to understand the myriad ways in which the arts are fundamental to human existence, used as a vehicle for the expression of faith, culture, aesthetics, and community. Class topics will include festivals and celebrations, pottery, food, tattoos and body art, textile arts, and costumes.

Folk-E151 Global Pop Music
Instructor: Daniel Reed
TR 9:05-9:55am +discussion section
CASE A&H, GCC; GenEd A&H, WC
Lecture Course # 31070

Congotronics. Afrobeat.  Ghanaian hiplife. Afrikaaner hip hop.  Musicians in Africa have created a rich and fascinating array of popular music styles. What do these musics sound like, and why?  How might we analyze African popular musics in order to better understand musicians’ motives, intentions, and creative processes?  Understood as a form of artistic communication, music is an effective vehicle for many kinds of social work. What roles do these musical styles play in movements for social change?  In revolutions?  As markers of generational, ethnic, racial, religious, gender, and other identities?  How do meanings associated with African popular musics change over time?  As African pop music and Africans peoples circulate transnationally, what happens musically?  How do commodification and media dissemination affect the ways Africans use popular music to communicate?  What roles do economics, globalization, transnational trends, and the music industry play in shaping African pop music and its interpretation? Structured thematically, this course will compare and contrast particular popular musics and explore what the study of these musics can reveal to us about the people who create and use them.

Folk-F230 Music in Social Movements
Instructor: Sue Tuohy
TR 2:30-3:45pm
CASE S&H; GenEd S&H
Course # 30889

How and why do people use music in movements that aim to change minds, behaviors, lives, and the world (or at least parts of it)?  This course focuses on music in social-political movements,  including the ways people use music as a form of representation and of social organization; the role of music in creating groups and disseminating messages; and music as an agent of social change. We will study human rights and environmental movements and political and cultural revolutions from different parts of the world (including within the U.S., China, and several African and South American nations) as well as transnational movements. We will consider the term 'movement' in at least two senses: 1) in the physical sense--movement as organized, collective action and, often, involving the movement of bodies; and 2) in the emotional sense of "moving."  These two senses combine in movements intent on mobilizing people for change and arousing people to action.

The course emphasizes the study of the arts in human life and in cross-cultural approaches to the study of expressive culture. Students will learn methods for analyzing musical and social performance and discourse, including those promoting ideas of human rights and collective action. Class members will find opportunities to pursue their interests in particular world areas (including Bloomington) and topics through flexible research assignments.  Graded components will include class preparation and participation, written assignments, quizzes, and a midterm and/or final exam.

The course is designed for students in the Folklore and Ethnomusicology as well as those interested in social movements, human rights, politics, the arts in society, and so on. Formal music training is not required, but a level of engagement and work found among students serious about their academic pursuits is expected.

Folk-F252 Folklore & the Internet
Instructor: Robby Dobler
MW 4:00-5:15pm
CASE A&H; GenEd A&H
Course # 14717

Folklore has always been concerned with the transmission of traditional beliefs and behaviors among groups of people across space and through time. Technological innovations have consistently created opportunities to expand the study of folklore into new contexts as conventional notions of both the "folk" and "lore" have shifted and grown to accommodate changing media technologies. This course will explore the folklore of the internet, examining what it means to be part of an online community, how the web shapes the transmission of expressive culture, and the ethics of conducting fieldwork among a virtual folk. Our explorations will include legends of supernatural beings like Slender Man; memes and the phenomenon of going viral; humor and folk speech on the web; fan culture and community; and the folk uses social networking sites like Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Folk-F252 Gender & Sexuality in Music
Instructor: Alisha Lola Jones
MW 2:30-3:45pm
CASE A&H; GenEd A&H
Course # 13299

This course is designed to examine the roles of gender and sexuality in musical performances from various music traditions. Our objective is to think and write critically about the ways in which performers’ identities influence their cultural transmission, production, reception, and distribution of music and sound. We will also consider the extent to which gender and sexuality are intersectional attributes that are conveyed and interpreted differently depending on the socio-cultural context. Throughout the semester, we will listen to, view, attend, and analyze performances in an interdisciplinary manner, drawing on literature from ethnomusicology, musicology, performance, and gender studies to interpret the meanings musicians generate through multi-media presentations. 

Folk-F253 Monsters & the Monstrous
Instructor: Michael Dylan Foster
TR 1:00-2:15pm
CASE S&H; GenEd S&H
Course # 14733

Monsters have haunted human culture for as long as history has been recorded. They embody our fears and fantasies, populate our stories and rituals and beliefs, and even infiltrate our dreams. While they play a role in ancient mythologies, they are also very much part of contemporary culture as well—from urban legends to films to anime and games. This course explores conceptions of the monstrous in the folklore of different cultures. We will consider monsters from a theoretical standpoint, beginning with the question What is a monster? and investigating the ways they can represent otherness and difference, reflect fears of the natural world, challenge our understanding of natural history and science, and articulate values and moral concerns. While exploring the monstrous as a broad conceptual category, we will also examine specific examples of monsters from folklore around the world. Wherever and whenever monsters proliferate, they mean something. They speak of the people who tell of them, and of the particular times and places in which they thrive.

Folk-F253 Mythology & Culture
Instructor: Greg Schrempp
MW 4:00-5:15pm
CASE S&H; GenEd S&H
Course # 10874

Class for Hutton Honors students and FOLK majors and minors. Other students contact gschremp@indiana.edu for possible authorization.

The term “mythology” carries a number of meanings, including ancient stories associated with rituals, potent symbols, and images with an uncanny power to stick in our minds and shape our worldviews.  In many usages, “mythology” also carries the connotation of the temporally, spatially, and/or geographically distant.  In this course, we will look at examples of such “distant” mythologies, including stories, rituals, and symbols embraced by the ancient Greeks, Pacific Islanders, and Native Americans (who, though spatially proximate, are regarded by many Americans as culturally distant).

Some scholars, however, think that it is too confining, if not prejudicial, to limit the concept of “myth” to such distant societies and cultures.  In the second part of the course, we will consider the idea that mythology is to be found in many forms of modern mass-culture, such as film, television, advertising, and popular iconography.  Throughout, we will consider the ways in which mythology intersects with culture more broadly and the ways it functions within society.

Anthropologists Bronislaw Malinowski’s “Myth in Primitive Psychology” will be the focal work for the first half of the course; literary and culture critic Roland Barthes’ “Mythologies” for the second.
Readings will be supplemented with visual materials.  The workload for this class will be average.  Grades will be based on participation, an in-class presentation, two short essays, and a concluding essay to be written during the final exam period.

Folk-F256 The Supernatural & Folklore
Instructor: Robert Dobler
MW 1:25pm-2:15pm +discussion section
CASE A&H, GCC; GenEd A&H
Lecture Course # 12156

Ghosts, vampires, werewolves and other supernatural beings are immensely popular and appear in contemporary novels, video games, films, and other media. Belief in the supernatural is explored in television shows that detail the exploits of “ghost hunters” or probe the possibility of extraterrestrial encounters. Statistics gathered by Gallop Poll indicate that an extremely large percentage of North Americans not only believe in the supernatural, but in fact, believe that they themselves have had a supernatural or paranormal experience. “Evidence” of the supernatural is, in this sense, all around us. What do people find so compelling about the supernatural? And why, as folklorists, should we concern ourselves with the study of supernatural tradition? This course examines the many forms of supernatural belief traditions that people express through traditional genres and through popular media. A key concept is the issue of belief: in this case, the conviction that experiences of the supernatural are genuine, and have important implications about life after death, the existence of spirits, magic, and related topics. Through specific case studies, we will explore the forms supernatural tradition and belief take in everyday life, and develop models for understanding how supernatural belief relates to other aspects of worldview and culture.

Folk-E295 Survey of Hip Hop
Instructor: Fernando Orejuela
TR 2:30-3:45pm
CASE A&H, DUS; GenEd A&H
Course # 9336

Class meets for lecture online twice a week - students must login during class times. This course examines rap music and hip hop culture as artistic and sociological phenomena with emphasis on historical, cultural, economic, and political contexts. Discussions will include the co-existence of various hip hop styles, their appropriation by the music industry, and controversies resulting from the exploitation of hip hop music and culture as a commodity for national and global consumption. Class meets two times on campus, for the midterm (scheduled Saturday, February 27th, 1:00 pm) and final exams (TBD). I repeat, the midterm exam is on a Saturday.

If you have not been in an Adobe Connect class room before and are working from home, at minimum, do the first item (Test your computer) before the first class session and download the plug-in. If you use a campus cluster computer, those computers are Adobe compatible but you still have to upload Flash to optimize the class best. Note 1: The classroom does not fully support iPhones or iPads at present time but does work well with PC-based tablets. Note 2: Students should never use Safari or Chrome browswers with OnCourse - they are not supported browsers. Firefox is recommended.

Folk-E297 Popular Music of Black America
Instructor: Tyron Cooper
TR 1:00-2:15pm
CASE A&H, DUS; GenEd A&H
Course # 32851

A chronological survey of Black popular music from 1945 to the present--rhythm & blues, soul, funk, disco, hip hop, and their derivative forms.  Emphasis will be placed on the context for evolution, defining musical features, marketing strategies of the music industry, creative/performance practice, and the contributions of African Americans to the development of a multi-billion dollar music industry and to the broader tradition of American popular music along with broader historical and contemporary issues in Black popular music. 

Folk-F305 Cultural Diversity in China
Instructor: Sue Tuohy
TR 9:30-10:45am
CASE A&H, GCC
Course # 14740, 15793

FOLK majors, EALC majors, and Chinese Flagship students register for section # 15793 by e-mailing tuohys@indiana.edu first for authorization. Non-FOLK majors, Non-EALC majors, and non-Chinese Flagship students register for section # 14740.

Meets with Folk-F600. In spite of media reports telling us that “Chinese culture is like this” and “Chinese people or do think that”, both China and Chinese are diverse. Emphasizing the importance of recognizing cultural and human diversity in contemporary China, the course will explore the multiple meanings of China and Chineseness. We will explore diverse forms of difference in China today—from regional, ethnic, gender, generational and regional, to rural and urban. Many class sessions will emphasize artistic and expressive forms (such as music and folklore, film and television, tourism and cultural heritage).

Among the broad questions to be addressed are: What is China? Who are Chinese? What is Chinese culture (and who says)? This diversity will be discussed in relation to Chinese history and interactions beyond the borders of China as well as contemporary politics and economics. Graded components will include class preparation and participation, written assignments, quizzes, and a midterm and/or final exam.

Folk-F305 Mongol Folklore
Instructor: C. Atwood
T 5:30-8:00pm
CASE A&H, GCC
Course # 31320

Folk-F315 Caribbean Arts & Cultures
Instructor: Steve Stuempfle
MW 2:30-3:45pm
CASE A&H, GCC
Course # 15421

This course will explore traditional artistic creativity in a variety of Anglophone, Hispanophone, and Francophone countries in the Caribbean. Our primary goal will be to understand how verbal expression, music, dance, and visual arts have been central to the formation of Caribbean societies and to the representation of these societies in the wider world. Among the many art forms we will consider are Orisha (Santería) traditions and popular dance music in Cuba; Vodou traditions, Rara festivity, and roots music in Haiti; Carnival and East Indian festivals in Trinidad; Junkanoo processions in the Bahamas; reggae and dancehall in Jamaica; and Puerto Rican casitas in New York City.

We will examine the styles and significance of these and other art forms in their various historical and social contexts. At the same time, we will employ a comparative perspective to identify broader patterns in Caribbean creativity, aesthetics, spirituality, and social change. Throughout the course, we will consider how artistic expression is interrelated with processes of colonialism, social stratification, creolization, urbanization, nationalism, and decolonization.

Readings for this course are selected from the fields of folklore studies, cultural anthropology, art history, ethnomusicology, and literary studies. Class lectures and discussions will be accompanied by a wide range of visual images, video clips, and audio recordings. No previous knowledge of the Caribbean is required for the course. However, students must demonstrate a serious commitment to studying the Caribbean as a central site of modern world history and to understanding artistic communication as a critical component of Caribbean life.

Folk-E345 Hip Hop Music & Culture
Instructor: Fernando Orejuela
MW 1:00-2:15pm
CASE A&H, DUS
Course #
31317

This seminar course will ask questions about the role of hip hop culture in contemporary American society. We will also explore recent debates about mainstreaming an African American musical artform, the role and responsibility of the artist, as well as the concept of tradition, creativity and the emerging scholarship on hip hop. Unlike the survey course, which takes a more historical approach to the study of hip hop, we will examine hip hop as a cultural movement with complex cultural, social and political ties to the past, present, and future of African America and the African diaspora. We will address issues in hip hop as opposed to a chronology and delve into the theoretical notions and application of “performance.” Classes designated for automatic IW credit must be limited to no more than 25 students.

Folk-F356 Latino Youth Culture: Deviance, Creativity, & Folklore
Instructor: Mintzi Martinez-Rivera
MW 2:30-3:45pm
CASE A&H, DUS
Course #
11814

Youths are the main group responsible for key social, cultural, economic and political changes in society. Latino Youth, specifically, have played a significant role in shaping mainstream youth culture in the United States. However, Latino Youth, as other minority groups, are heavily criminalized and considered deviant. In this course we will analyze different cultural practices performed by Latino Youth using the concepts of deviancy and creativity as cornerstones. Some of the cultural practices that we will examine are pachuco culture, graffiti, lowriding, gang-life, salsa, hip-hop, among other cultural manifestations; the different case studies will allow us to study Latino Youth’s active participation in creating, negotiating, and transforming the culture and community where they live. This class will combine Latino Studies and Folklore studies in order to analyze and explore the multiple and varied Latino cultural performances and experiences from a holistic approach.

Folk-F364 Children's Folklore
Instructor: Brandon Barker
MW 9:30-10:45am
CASE A&H, DUS
Course # 12165

Everyone’s played patty-cake, and who doesn’t enjoy a good game of hop-scotch? But, do you remember playing Light as a Feather, Stiff as a Board? Do you know what actually is grosser than gross? From the games of the playground to the secret, scary play that happens behind closed doors, this course will examine the full range of children’s folklore.

Folk-F401 Methods & Theories
Instructor: Fernando Orejuela
TR 9:30-10:45am
CASE S&H
Course #
8474 (FOLK majors and minors only. E-mail mmelhous@indiana.edu to obtain online authorization.)

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to principle theories and methods in the two fields composing our department, Folklore and Ethnomusicology. Folklorists and ethnomusicologists study the meanings of expressive forms in the everyday lives of individuals and their roles in society. Our two fields share a common focus on forms of artistic performance and expressive culture. Our scholarship also demonstrates a shared interest in the study of people and their artistic productions. Our research aims to contribute to the understanding of social processes, artistic practices, and human creativity.

We will engage in discussions on the following: (1) examining the convergences and divergences of the two fields; (2) their histories and current research paradigms; (3) basic concepts such as community, tradition, genre, performance; (4) research methods; and (5) the issues associated with presenting/representing people in the public setting.

Required textbooks:
1. Bauman, Richard (ed.). 1992. Folklore, Cultural Performances, and Popular Entertainments: A Communications-Centered Handbook. New York: Oxford University Press.
2. Ruth Stone. 2007. Theory for Ethnomusicology. New York: Prentice Hall.

Folk-F404 Fieldwork & Ethnography
Instructor: Sue Tuohy
TR 11:15am-12:30pm
CASE A&H
Course #
15420

This course is about fieldwork, a method for studying people, and studying with people, in the midst of their social lives—their (our) beliefs, behaviors, values, creative processes and products, and the ways that people make sense of and live in their (our) worlds. We use fieldwork, or ethnographic research, as a way to learn about anything from local foodways and musical communities, to individual artists, religious rituals, festivals, DIY recording studios, and stories.  Students will learn about fieldwork methods as well as different kinds of ethnographic products, from written reports to ethnographic film and digital formats. Students will learn practical skills in proposal writing, participant observation, interviewing, documentation, analysis, and presentation by putting them into practice in their own research projects.

F408 Museum Practicum in Folklore
Instructor: Jason Jackson
Course # 33088

The Museum Practicum in Folklore (1-3 cr.) provides students with the opportunity to gain hands-on work experience in museums while earning academic credit through Indiana University's Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology. Practica require prior agreement and must be arranged with supervising museum personnel and the course instructor (Faculty of Record), Professor Jason Jackson, Director of the Mathers Museum of World Cultures (jbj@indiana.edu, 812-856-1868).

Practica may be arranged at any museum. If you wish to arrange a practicum at a museum other than the Mathers Museum of World Cultures, you must obtain written permission from a designated supervisor at that institution. General guidelines require that you and your supervisor agree upon the number of credit hours to be awarded, the number of hours to be worked per week, and the specific work schedule. Your designated supervisor will be responsible for assessing your performance and recommending a grade to the Faculty of Record.  Please bring a copy of the supervisor's statement of permission to Professor Jackson when you request authorization to enroll. (It may also be forwarded directly to Professor Jackson from your supervisor.) Students interested in arranging practica at the Mathers Museum should visit http://www.indiana.edu/~mathers/museumprac.html - for detailed information regarding a specific practicum. Practica may involve collections research, curation, conservation, education/programs, the museum store, exhibits, and photography.

To apply for a practicum at the Mathers Museum, please review the information on the website, then contact the appropriate departmental supervisor (noted at the top of each listing) to request an application and arrange an interview. Acceptance of students is limited. The required number of practicum hours worked per week at the Mathers Museum varies according to the number of credit hours of A408 the student is enrolled in, and the semester of enrollment. See the Practicum Guide (online) for details.

Folk-F420 American Country Music
Instructor: Brandon Barker
MW 1:00-2:15pm
CASE A&H
Course # 13307

You know Hank Williams, Dolly Parton, Miranda Lamberth, Blake Shelton, and Kacey Musgrave, but do you know about these singers' folk roots in southern blues, Appalachian music, southwestern swing, or gospel? This course critically examines the intersection of popular Country Music and the folk traditions that support it. We ask questions like what do cowboy boots and hats really have to do with Nashville, Tennessee?  Who actually invented the slide guitar? Or, why do all country singers use a Southern accent? We ask all these while surveying a host of past and present stars of Country Music.

Cross-Listed Courses