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Spring 2017 Undergraduate Course Offerings

Folk-F101 Introduction to Folklore
Instructor: Brandon Barker
MW 11:15am-12:05pm +discussion section
CASE A&H; GenEd A&H
Lecture Course # 5983

Lecture Location: Jordan Hall 124

Folklore is alive and inspires the choices we make every day: how we communicate, what foods we eat, what games we play, what stories we tell, how we interpret the world around us. Folklore reflects our values, our prejudices, our fears, and our desires. The practices, beliefs, and objects that constitute  folklore are so intrinsic to our daily lives that they are often overlooked in other disciplines that study human culture, but every culture has folklore and we are all part of the folk. In this course we will consider the role folklore plays in the lives of people around the world.

Folk-F101 Introduction to Folklore
Instructor: Robby Dobler
MW 3:35-4:25pm +discussion section
CASE A&H; GenEd A&H
Lecture Course # 14875
Lecture Location: Swain East 105

Folklore is alive and inspires the choices we make every day: how we communicate, what foods we eat, what games we play, what stories we tell, how we interpret the world around us. Folklore reflects our values, our prejudices, our fears, and our desires. The practices, beliefs, and objects that constitute  folklore are so intrinsic to our daily lives that they are often overlooked in other disciplines that study human culture, but every culture has folklore and we are all part of the folk. In this course we will consider the role folklore plays in the lives of people around the world.

Folk-F111 World Music & Culture
Instructor: Jennie Gubner
TR 11:15am-12:05pm +discussion section
CASE A&H; GenEd A&H, WC
Lecture Course # 5989
Lecture Location: Morrison Hall 007

This course is designed to provide students with the tools to engage various forms of musical expression as social practice across diverse locations, media, and societies. A primary goal is to problematize “world music” as a homogenous category by considering its meaning in social, economic, political and creative spheres of music as social life. We will re-consider the ways in which this category can incorporate numerous musical experiences so as not to regulate such practices to a realm for “the other” or “foreign.” This course will explore the work of key figures within ethnomusicology and the manner with which they analyze music in the social lives of the people with which they work. Throughout the semester, students are expected to critically think about the participatory, presentational, and political components of music making; to listen to sonic elements that distinguish musical genres from one another; to articulate thoughtfully the ways in which musical activities construct identity; and to write persuasively about the role of music in social life.

Folk-F121 World Arts & Cultures
Instructor: Pravina Shukla
MW 12:20-1:10pm +discussion section
CASE S&H, GCC; GenEd S&H, WC
Lecture Course # 15577
Lecture Location: Morrison Hall 007

This course will explore traditional arts, looking at different mediums of artistic expression, and at a variety of cultural contexts around the world and within the United States. Each week we will travel to a different region of the world where artistic expression – as material culture -- enables people to present themselves as members of groups and as individuals. Throughout the semester, we will seek to understand the myriad ways in which the arts are fundamental to human existence, used as a vehicle for the expression of faith, culture, aesthetics, and community. Class topics will include festivals and celebrations, pottery, food, tattoos and body art, textile arts, and costumes.

Folk-F121 World Arts & Cultures
Instructor: Jason Jackson
TR 9:30am-10:45am
CASE S&H, GCC; GenEd S&H, WC

Lecture Course # 35666
Location: Public Heath Building 154

Surveying the customary arts of the world’s peoples offers a means of comprehending the human condition today. This course explores how culture is made manifest, especially in such media as landscapes, architecture, material culture, and expressive performances. A sampling of world arts, it also provides an introduction to folklife studies. The course is about exploring customary ways of living, especially during times of change, when inherited ways of life are something people become self-conscious about. It is this self-consciousness that causes people to label particular customs as traditions or heritage and then to react to them in particular ways that might emphasize everything from glorification, celebration, and revitalization to quiet abandonment or outright rejection. In considering customary ways of life and their broader human significance we will adopt a global perspective and consider the larger social forces that underpin social change in the contemporary world.

Folk-E151 Global Pop Music
Instructor: Alisha Jones
TR 10:10-11:00am +discussion section
CASE A&H, GCC; GenEd A&H, WC
Lecture Course # 16508
Lecture Location: Woodburn Hall 100

Isicathamiya in South Africa. Reggaeton in Panama. Ghanaian Hiplife. Rap in New Zealand. People around the world have created a rich and fascinating array of popular music styles. What do these musics sound like, and why? How might we analyze popular musics in order to better understand musicians’ motives, intentions, and creative processes? What roles do these musical styles play in movements for social change? With an emphasis on musics of the African diaspora, this course is designed thematically to provide students with the tools to engage various forms of popular musical expression as social practice across diverse locations, media, and societies. Throughout the semester, students are expected to critically think about the participatory, presentational, and political components of music making; to listen to sonic elements that distinguish musical genres from one another; to articulate thoughtfully the ways in which musical activities construct identity; and to write persuasively about the role of pop musics in social life.

Folk-F252 Youth Sub-cultures & Music
Instructor: Fernando Orejuela
TR 1:00-2:15pm
CASE A&H; GenEd A&H
Course # 13573

Location: Classroom Office Building 203

This course will focus on the informal processes through which young people negotiate “childhood,” “tweens,” “teenager,” and “youth” and as a means of understanding how they use music in their everyday lives to construct a status quo as well as resist the dominant adult culture. The course explores the musical cultures of youth as a continuum of social processes, created within the context of real, imagined, and historical communities. The course is not about music appreciation; rather we will investigate the ways youth create music, subcultures of musicking, and social movements aimed at changing attitudes and behaviors.

Folk-F252 Folklore & the Internet
Instructor: Robby Dobler
MW 11:15am-12:30pm
CASE A&H; GenEd A&H
Course # 14586
Location: Classroom Office Building 203

Folklore has always been concerned with the transmission of traditional beliefs and behaviors among groups of people across space and through time. Technological innovations have consistently created opportunities to expand the study of folklore into new contexts as conventional notions of both the "folk" and "lore" have shifted and grown to accommodate changing media technologies. This course will explore the folklore of the internet, examining what it means to be part of an online community, how the web shapes the transmission of expressive culture, and the ethics of conducting fieldwork among a virtual folk. Our explorations will include legends of supernatural beings like Slender Man; memes and the phenomenon of going viral; humor and folk speech on the web; fan culture and community; and the folk uses social networking sites like Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Folk-F252 Music & Memory: Studying Music & Alzheimer's through Film
Instructor: Jennie Gubner
TR 2:30-3:45pm
CASE A&H; GenEd A&H
Course # 31555
Location: Sycamore Hall 137

In this interdisciplinary, hands-on course, we will explore the relationship between music, memory, and the brain through fieldwork, filmmaking, and service work in the local Bloomington community. As a class, we will create personalized iPod playlists for individuals suffering from dementia and Alzheimers, working directly with individuals and their families to find songs that target positive memories from their life stories. In order to raise awareness about the positive effects music can have as an alternative form of therapy, we will produce short filmed ethnographies of these encounters, learning basic techniques of filming and editing along the way. Through fieldwork, filmmaking, and seminar style in-class discussion, students will learn to think critically about the growing fields of medical ethnomusicology, applied research, and digital and multimodal approaches to studying and documenting culture.

Folk-F252 Representing Jews & African Americans in American Musical Theatre
Instructor: Judah Cohen
MW 2:30-3:45pm
CASE A&H; GenEd A&H
Course # 32923
Location: Swain West 219

In this course, we will look at the representation of Jews and African-Americans on the musical theater stage. Focusing on major works such as Shuffle Along, The Wiz, Fiddler on the Roof and The Producers, we will explore what it means for each group to represent itself and to be represented through the conventions of musical theater.

Folk-F253 Music, Community, Sustainability
Instructor: Sue Tuohy
TR 11:15am-12:30pm
CASE S&H; GenEd S&H
Course # 11568
Location: Classroom Office Building 203

This course will focus on the intersections of music and the sustainability and vitality of people and the communities and environments in which we live.  Among the topics we will explore are:

* The ways people use music to express their worldviews and ideas about the communities, places, and environments in which they live;
* Musical activists and projects intended to raise awareness of critical issues related to the preservation of bio-cultural diversity;
* Music and community healing, social justice, and strategies to meet the challenges of rapid social-cultural transformations, development, and environmental degradation;
* Insights and methods from ecomusicology, ecocriticism, and acoustic ecology

We will explore these issues through case studies of places and communities from different parts of the world, including Bloomington, IN.

Folk-F256 The Supernatural & Folklore
Instructor: Robert Dobler
MW 1:25pm-2:15pm +discussion section
CASE A&H, GCC; GenEd A&H
Lecture Course # 12625
Lecture Location: Jordan Hall 124

Ghosts, vampires, werewolves and other supernatural beings are immensely popular and appear in contemporary novels, video games, films, and other media. Belief in the supernatural is explored in television shows that detail the exploits of “ghost hunters” or probe the possibility of extraterrestrial encounters. Statistics gathered by Gallop Poll indicate that an extremely large percentage of North Americans not only believe in the supernatural, but in fact, believe that they themselves have had a supernatural or paranormal experience. “Evidence” of the supernatural is, in this sense, all around us. What do people find so compelling about the supernatural? And why, as folklorists, should we concern ourselves with the study of supernatural tradition? This course examines the many forms of supernatural belief traditions that people express through traditional genres and through popular media. A key concept is the issue of belief: in this case, the conviction that experiences of the supernatural are genuine, and have important implications about life after death, the existence of spirits, magic, and related topics. Through specific case studies, we will explore the forms supernatural tradition and belief take in everyday life, and develop models for understanding how supernatural belief relates to other aspects of worldview and culture.

Folk-E295 Survey of Hip Hop
Instructor: Fernando Orejuela
MW 2:30-3:45pm
CASE A&H, DUS; GenEd A&H
Course # 10215

ABOVE CLASS is taught as a web-based course only, using BREEZE (Adobe Connect).

Above class MEETS IN A VIRTUAL CLASSROOM ON THE INTERNET FOR LECTURE 2 TIMES PER WEEK. The exams will be online using an online proctoring APP.  If you are unable to use this APP we will schedule a campus exam site for the Midterm and Final Exams. The alternative, face-to-face Midterm is scheduled for Saturday, February 18th, 1:00 pm. The Final TBA.

Above class students must be enrolled at IUB in order to add this course. Course materials will be available on Canvas the day before our first meeting.

If you have not been in an Adobe Connect class room before and are working from home, at minimum, do the first item (Test your computer) before the first class session and download the plug-in: http://connect.iu.edu/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm

If you use a campus cluster computer, those computers are Adobe compatible but you have to upload Flash every time to optimize the class best.

This course examines rap music and hip hop culture as artistic and sociological phenomena with emphasis on historical, cultural, economic and political contexts. Discussions will include the co-existence of various hip hop styles, their appropriation by the music industry, and controversies resulting from the exploitation of hip hop music and culture as a commodity for national and global consumption.

Fernando Orejuela’s Rap and Hip Hop Culture (2015) will be our main textbook and articles will be made available to you in Canvas throughout the semester.

NOTE 1: The classroom does not FULLY support iPhone or iPads at present time but does work well with other tablets.

NOTE 2: Students should avoid Safari.  IU does not support that browser. I recommend Firefox or Chrome for the virtual classroom and Canvas.

Folk-F312 Irish Folklore
Instructor: Ray Cashman
MW 9:30-10:45am
CASE A&H, DUS; GenEd A&H
Course # 31396
Location: Cedar Hall C102

This course introduces the popular beliefs, vernacular customs, material culture, and especially, oral traditions of Ireland.  Topics include supernatural legends of ghosts and fairies, folktales and heroic tales, traditional customs at wakes and holy wells, seasonal drama including mumming, folk history in song and story, and vernacular forms of political expression such as annual commemorative parades and public murals.
 
Although much of Irish folklore has roots in the far distant past, we will focus on those traditions documented from the 19th through 21st centuries—a period during which folklore inspired an Irish literary revival and served the nation-building project of a newly independent republic. We will conclude with an investigation of the politics of culture and identity in contemporary Northern Ireland where the legacy of British colonialism remains most pronounced.
 
Assignments include a midterm exam, final paper, and a transcription project in which students take materials collected by the Irish Folklore Commission in the 1930s and make them digitally accessible for scholars and the general public.

Folk-F330 Folk Religion & Popular Belief
Instructor: Diane Goldstein
TR 2:30-3:45pm
CASE A&H
Course # 32742
Location: Classroom Office Building 203

This course will serve as an introduction to the concepts, types and practices that are understood broadly to be associated with folk or vernacular and popular religion.  We will discuss a number of religious traditions exploring the nature of everyday religious belief and practice in relation to more formal religious expression. 

F330 Latino Gangs, Cartels, & Social Networks
Instructor: Eric Morales
MW 4:00-5:15pm
CASE S&H
Course # 33525
Location: Woodburn Hall 002

This class will unpack the realities facing Latino gang members, from adolescent street gangs to international drug cartels. Rather than see gangs solely as sources of crime and violence, we will approach street gangs as alternative social structures that counter the alienation and marginalization resultant from issues of economic and social disparities. In the process, we will provide a holistic understanding of street life, looking at markers of expressive traditions, (tattoos, clothing, lowrider cars, folk religion), as well as a history of systemic social inequities (school to prison pipeline, racial segregation, barriers to education and employment). Throughout the semester, we will problematize issues of social networks, immigration, masculinity & femininity, sexuality, stereotypes, gentrification, and ethnicity. Our discussions of the causes, functions, and rituals of gang culture will be informed with perspectives provided from Folklore, Anthropology, Latino Studies, and Critical Race Theory. While Latino gang culture, primarily West and East Coast, is the focus, we will cover social concerns that affect numerous disenfranchised populations.

Folk-F351 American Regional Cultures
Instructor: Ray Cashman
TR 1:00-2:15pm
CASE A&H, DUS
Course # 31514

Location: Radio/TV 226

This course introduces you to three American regions through folklore forms including jokes, legends, ballads, folktales, foodways, and festivals.  Imagined as different from a supposed American norm, each region is both attractive to outsiders and stigmatized by them. In each region, a dynamic vernacular culture has emerged out of complex race and class relations. In each region, both government policy and economic forces have powerfully transformed local lifeways and the physical environment, and popular political expression has been subject to violent repression. At the same time, each region is connected culturally and economically to the outside world: Louisiana looks to the Francophone world and the African diaspora, Texas maintains strong relationships across the border with Mexico, and since the eighteenth century Appalachia has been linked through trade and migration to far-flung places including Spain and China.
 
We’ll look at historical change through the prism of celebrated folklore forms such as Louisiana Mardi Gras, the Tex-Mex corrido, and Appalachian folktales. We’ll also explore the impact—economic, environmental, demographic, and thus also cultural—of recent events: Hurricane Katrina and the reconstruction of the Gulf Coast, mountaintop-removal mining in Appalachia, and debates over various kinds of traffic (migrants, drugs, and capital) across the US-Mexican border. 

Folk-F351 Making American Roots Music
Instructor: Jennie Gubner
W 6:00-8:30pm
CASE A&H, DUS
Course # 31530

Location: Classroom Office Building 203

This is a performance-based ensemble/seminar on American Roots Music, meaning that you are expected to have basic knowledge of an instrument that falls within this tradition in order to take this course. Instruments may include: guitar, violin, banjo, mandolin, dulcimer, autoharp, string bass. Please contact the professor for any further inquiries at jgubner@indiana.edu. No authorization required.

Do you sing or play a little fiddle, banjo, mandolin, guitar, bass, dulcimer, autoharp or other old-time or bluegrass instrument? In this performance seminar we will come together one evening a week to learn about these traditions while bringing them to life through our instruments and voices in an ensemble format. By reading biographies of artists, watching films, playing music, having discussions, and exploring archival materials, we will immerse ourselves in the people, places, sounds and cultural forces that have shaped the rich history of old-time, bluegrass, folk, and other types of American roots music. To be comfortable in this course you do not need to be an advanced player but should be able to play basic chords and/or melodies on your instrument of choice. Please contact the professor for any further inquiries.

F356 Caribbean Arts & Cultures
Instructor: Steve Stuempfle
MW 2:30-3:45pm
CASE A&H
Course # 31513
Location: Classroom Office Building 203

This course will explore traditional artistic creativity in a variety of Anglophone, Hispanophone, and Francophone countries in the Caribbean. Our primary goal will be to understand how verbal expression, music, dance, and visual arts have been central to the formation of Caribbean societies and to the representation of these societies in the wider world. Among the many art forms we will consider are Orisha (Santería) traditions and popular dance music in Cuba; Vodou traditions, Rara festivity, and roots music in Haiti; Carnival and East Indian festivals in Trinidad; Junkanoo processions in the Bahamas; reggae and dancehall in Jamaica; and Puerto Rican casitas in New York City.
 
We will examine the styles and significance of these and other art forms in their various historical and social contexts. At the same time, we will employ a comparative perspective to identify broader patterns in Caribbean creativity, aesthetics, spirituality, and social change. Throughout the course, we will consider how artistic expression is interrelated with processes of colonialism, social stratification, creolization, urbanization, nationalism, and decolonization.
 
Readings for this course are selected from the fields of folklore studies, cultural anthropology, art history, ethnomusicology, and literary studies. Class lectures and discussions will be accompanied by a wide range of visual images, video clips, and audio recordings. No previous knowledge of the Caribbean is required for the course. However, students must demonstrate a serious commitment to studying the Caribbean as a central site of modern world history and to understanding artistic communication as a critical component of Caribbean life.

Folk-F364 Children's Folklore
Instructor: Brandon Barker
MW 9:30-10:45am
CASE A&H, DUS
Course # 12632
Location: Classroom Office Building 203

Everyone’s played patty-cake, and who doesn’t enjoy a good game of hop-scotch? But, do you remember playing Light as a Feather, Stiff as a Board? Do you know what actually is grosser than gross? From the games of the playground to the secret, scary play that happens behind closed doors, this course will examine the full range of children’s folklore.

Folk-F499 Honors Thesis
Course # 13581

Requires permission of the department. Contact Undergraduate Academic Advisor Krystie Herndon at kherndon@indiana.edu for details on our honors program. Contact mmelhous@indiana.edu for registration authorization.

Folk-F401 Methods & Theories
Instructor: Fernando Orejuela
MW 11:15am-12:30pm
CASE S&H
Course # 9425
(FOLK majors and minors only. E-mail mmelhous@indiana.edu to obtain online authorization.)
Location: Classroom Office Building 272

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to principle theories and methods in the two fields composing our department, Folklore and Ethnomusicology. Folklorists and ethnomusicologists study the meanings of expressive forms in the everyday lives of individuals and their roles in society. Our two fields share a common focus on forms of artistic performance and expressive culture. Our scholarship also demonstrates a shared interest in the study of people and their artistic productions. Our research aims to contribute to the understanding of social processes, artistic practices, and human creativity.

We will engage in discussions on the following: (1) examining the convergences and divergences of the two fields; (2) their histories and current research paradigms; (3) basic concepts such as community, tradition, genre, performance; (4) research methods; and (5) the issues associated with presenting/representing people in the public setting.

Required textbooks:
1. Bauman, Richard (ed.). 1992. Folklore, Cultural Performances, and Popular Entertainments: A Communications-Centered Handbook. New York: Oxford University Press.
2. Ruth Stone. 2007. Theory for Ethnomusicology. New York: Prentice Hall.

Folk-F420 American Country Music
Instructor: Brandon Barker
MW 1:00-2:15pm
CASE A&H
Course # 13579
Location: Classroom Office Building 203

American Country Music prides itself on tradition and the bright lights of Nashville's highly profitable music business. This course considers both by examining the music of Country's biggest stars--like Hank Williams, Dolly Parton, and Elvis Presley--in the contexts of their folk roots in gospel, Appalachian balladry, delta blues, and southwestern swing.

X476 Museum Practicum in Folklore
Instructor: Jason Jackson
Course # 17147

The Museum Practicum in Folklore (1-3 cr.) provides students with the opportunity to gain hands-on work experience in museums while earning academic credit through Indiana University's Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology. Practica require prior agreement and must be arranged with supervising museum personnel and the course instructor (Faculty of Record), Professor Jason Jackson, Director of the Mathers Museum of World Cultures (jbj@indiana.edu, 812-856-1868).

Practica may be arranged at any museum. If you wish to arrange a practicum at a museum other than the Mathers Museum of World Cultures, you must obtain written permission from a designated supervisor at that institution. General guidelines require that you and your supervisor agree upon the number of credit hours to be awarded, the number of hours to be worked per week, and the specific work schedule. Your designated supervisor will be responsible for assessing your performance and recommending a grade to the Faculty of Record.  Please bring a copy of the supervisor's statement of permission to Professor Jackson when you request authorization to enroll. (It may also be forwarded directly to Professor Jackson from your supervisor.) Students interested in arranging practica at the Mathers Museum should visit http://www.indiana.edu/~mathers/museumprac.html - for detailed information regarding a specific practicum. Practica may involve collections research, curation, conservation, education/programs, the museum store, exhibits, and photography.

To apply for a practicum at the Mathers Museum, please review the information on the website, then contact the appropriate departmental supervisor (noted at the top of each listing) to request an application and arrange an interview. Acceptance of students is limited. The required number of practicum hours worked per week at the Mathers Museum varies according to the number of credit hours of A408 the student is enrolled in, and the semester of enrollment. See the Practicum Guide (online) for details.

 

Cross-Listed Courses