Indiana University Bloomington
Department of French and Italian

Undergraduate Courses in French and Italian

Refer to the Academic Building Code Directory to understand room codes.



First Six-Week Session
Tuesday, May 7—Friday, June 28

FRIT F100: Elementary French I (4 cr.)
Nicole Burkholder

NumberDaysTimeRoom
8810MTWRF1:00-2:40BH 135

Introduction to French language and selected aspects of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of F100, F115, or F491. Watch video

FRIT F200: Second-Year French I: Language and Culture (3 cr.)
Renata Uzzell

NumberDaysTimeRoom
8812MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 319

Prerequisite: F150 or equivalent. Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following third-semester courses: F200, F205, or F219.

FRIT F250: Second-Year French II: Language and Culture (3 cr.)
Cynthia Kanko

NumberDaysTimeRoom
8813MTWRF12:45-2:00BH 206

Prerequisite: F200 or equivalent. Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following fourth-semester courses: F250, F255, F265, or F269.

FRIT F491: Elementary French for Graduate Students
Sarah Kay Hurst

NumberDaysTimeRoomNotes
8815MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 205Undergraduates only

Although this course is designed for graduate students who seek to develop reading knowledge of French, it is also open to undergraduate students. However, it will not count toward the French major or minor, and it will not count toward fulfilling the undergraduate language requirement. The course provides an introduction to structures of the language necessary for reading, followed by reading in graded texts of a general nature. Credit given for only one of F491 or any French course at the 100-level.

FRIT F495: Individual Readings in French (1-3 cr.)
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
8819Arranged

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of the department's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.

FRIT M100: Elementary Italian I (4 cr.)
Paola Marrero Hernandez

NumberDaysTimeRoom
8825MTWRF10:20-12:00BH 344

Introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that develop grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Cultural topics and simple cultural comparisons are introduced. Credit given for only one of the following: M100, M110, M115, or M491.

FRIT M200: Intermediate Italian I (3 cr.)
Edward Bowen

NumberDaysTimeRoom
11105MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 148

Prerequisite: M110, M115, M150, or equivalent. Building on Elementary Italian I and II, students further study and practice fundamental concepts and structures in Italian grammar. Through a variety of assignments and activities, they strengthen proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, writing, cultural analysis and understanding. Includes an introduction to brief literary texts. Credit given for only one of M200 or M215.

FRIT M495: Individual Readings in Italian Literature (1-3 cr.)
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
8827Arranged

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of the department's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.

Second Six-Week Session
Monday, June 17—Friday, July 26

FRIT F150: Elementary French II: Language and Culture (4 cr.)
Emily O'Brock

NumberDaysTimeRoom
8811MTWRF1:00-2:40BH 135

Prerequisite: F100. Basic structures of the French language and selected topics of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of the following: F115, F150, or F491.

FRIT F250: Second-Year French II: Language and Culture (3 cr.)
Carly Bahler

NumberDaysTimeRoom
8814MTWRF12:45-2:00BH 206

Prerequisite: F200 or equivalent. Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following fourth-semester courses: F250, F255, F265, or F269.

FRIT F492: Reading French for Graduate Students
Michael Dow

NumberDaysTimeRoomNotes
8817MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 319Undergraduates only

Prerequisite: F491 or consent of department. Although this course is designed for graduate students who seek to develop reading knowledge of French, it is also open to undergraduate students. However, it will not count toward the French major or minor, and it will not count toward fulfilling the undergraduate language requirement. The course includes a continuation of language and reading development from F491.

FRIT F495: Individual Readings in French (1-3 cr.)
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
8820Arranged

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of the department's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.

FRIT M150: Elementary Italian II (4 cr.)
Anthony Nussmeier

NumberDaysTimeRoom
8826MTWRF10:20-12:00

Prerequisite: M100. Continued introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that build grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Practice with new cultural topics and basic cultural analysis. Credit given for only one of the following: M110, M115, M150, or M491.

FRIT M250: Intermediate Italian II (3 cr.)
Sandro Puiatti

NumberDaysTimeRoom
11106MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 206

Prerequisite: M200 or equivalent. The study of more complex concepts and structures in Italian grammar. Through a variety of texts, media, and assignments, students practice listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and they analyze cultural topics and situations in greater depth. Increased attention to short literary texts. Credit given for only one of M250 or M215.

FRIT M495: Individual Readings in Italian Literature (1-3 cr.)
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
8828Arranged

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of the department's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.



French Courses

FRIT F100: Elementary French I (4 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
2923MTWR8:00-8:50SY 002Jamie Root
2925MTWR9:05-9:55SY 002Kelly Casper-Kushman
2926 (CANCELLED)MTWR9:05-9:55SW 103
2927MTWR10:10-11:00FQ 012AMartin Maillot
2928MTWR11:15-12:05SY 137Kelly Casper-Kushman
2933MTWR11:15-12:05SY 002Renata Uzzell
2930MTWR12:20-1:10SY 002Laura Demsey
2931MTWR1:25-2:15SY 002Alan Ames
2932MTWR1:25-2:15BH 238Jill Owen
2934MTWR2:30-3:20SW 103Jessica Tindira
2929MTWR2:30-3:20SY 002Jason Siegel
2924MTWR4:40-5:30SY 002Jason Siegel
2936MW7:15-8:45 pmBH 332Kelly Farmer
2935TR7:15-8:45 pmBH 148Renata Uzzell

Introduction to French language and selected aspects of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of F100, F115, or F491. Watch video

FRIT F115: Accelerated Elementary French (4 cr.)
TBA

NumberDaysTimeRoom
2937MTWR10:10-11:00SY 002
9978MTWR11:15-12:05SY 108

Prerequisite: Obtain authorization from department.

An accelerated treatment of material covered in both F100 and F150 designed for superior students and students with previous training in another foreign language. Credit given for only one of F115 and F100; Credit given for only one of F115 and F150. If interested, please fill out the online authorization form.

FRIT F150: Elementary French II: Language and Culture (4 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
2938MTWR8:00-8:50BH 135Erin Myers
2939MTWR9:05-9:55BH 135Noelle Brown
2940MTWR10:10-11:00BH 135Noelle Brown
2941MTWR11:15-12:05BH 135Scott Cawthon
2942MTWR12:20-1:10BH 135Scott Cawthon
2943MTWR1:25-2:15SY 106Erin Myers
2944MTWR1:25-2:15BH 135Emily O'Brock
2945MTWR2:30-3:20BH 135Emily O'Brock
2946TR7:15-8:45 pmBH 232Margarita Madanova

Prerequisite: F100.

Basic structures of the French language and selected topics of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of the following: F115, F150, or F491.

FRIT F200: Second-Year French I: Language and Culture (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
2947MWF8:00-8:50BH 149Carly Bahler
2948MWF9:05-9:55BH 229Carly Bahler
2950MWF10:10-11:00SY 212Sarah Kay Hurst
2949MWF11:15-12:05BH 233Alisha Reaves
2951MWF11:15-12:05BH 140Sarah Kay Hurst
2952MWF12:20-1:10BH 331Nicole Burkholder
2953MWF1:25-2:15BH 237Anemarie Calin
2955MWF2:30-3:20BH 016Anemarie Calin
2956MWF2:30-3:20PY 113Nicole Burkholder
2954MWF4:40-5:30FA 010Alisha Reaves
2957MW7:15-8:30 pmWH 119Mark Black
2958TR7:15-8:30 pmBH 147Mark Black

Prerequisite: F150 or equivalent.

Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following third-semester courses: F200, F205, or F219.

FRIT F250: Second-Year French II: Language and Culture (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
2960MWF9:05-9:55BH 333Loïc Lerme
2961MWF10:10-11:00BH 332Loïc Lerme
2963MWF12:20-1:10BH 237Rodica Frimu
2964MWF1:25-2:15SE 240Rodica Frimu
2965MWF2:30-3:20SY 0008Erin Edgington
2959MWF3:35-4:25BH 219Krista Williams
2966MW7:15-8:30 pmBH 105Erin Edgington
34584MW7:15-8:30 pmBH 144Krista Williams

Prerequisite: F200 or equivalent.

Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following fourth-semester courses: F250, F255, F265, or F269.

FRIT F300: Reading & Expression in French (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
8985MW
F
10:10-11:00BH 205
BH 221
Emanuel Mickel
2970MWF11:15-12:05BH 138Aiko Okamoto-MacPhail
2967TR9:30-10:45KH 212Erin Myers
2969TR11:15-12:30BH 138Guillaume Ansart
9786TR1:00-2:15SB 140Georgy Khabarovskiy
2968TR2:30-3:45BH 138Nicolas Valazza

Prerequisite: F250, F255, F265, or consent of department.

Emanuel Mickel

Students in F300 will read an anthology of French poetry and a play, Le jeu de l'amour et du hasard, and the short novel Manon Lescaut. We shall begin the semester with the poetry, learning how to read and analyze poems using the explication de texte method. Both the play and the novel illustrate the struggle between the intellect and the senses, a dominant theme in Western European literature. Le jeu de l'amour et du hasard has fun with the classic tradition and makes a play of words on philosophy and love. Manon Lescaut is certainly within the classic tradition but on the cusp of Romanticism as the young chevalier meets a different kind of woman.

Students will write a paper in French. There will be two one-hour exams and a two-hour final. The course will be conducted in French.

Aiko Okamoto-MacPhail

This course introduces students to four genres of French Literature : fiction, essay, theater, and poetry. We start the semester with poetry from the Course Packet. Each student will choose one poem and do an exposé in class and write an explication de texte. Then we advance to the 17th-century play by Jean Racine Phèdre and study the theater and the classic alexandrine verse which Racine perfected. We will read short stories from the nineteenth century, Le château de Pictordu by a woman writer George Sand and the selection of Trois contes by Gustave Flaubert. We will end the semester with some short excerpts from various modern essays that include but are not limited to good articles such as Discours d’ouverture of French Academy published in Le Monde provided on-line or in the Course Packet.

Erin Myers

This course asks what it means to be human by exploring literature which places the human in contrast with its presumed opposites: the animal, the supernatural, the monster, the primitive, the machine, the imaginary, the disembodied, and the absent. We will read texts from the 12th to the 20th centuries in various genres including poetry, theater, essays, autobiography, short story and novel, and we will also view works of visual art and film (live action and stop action animation). This course seeks to expand your comprehension and appreciation of French literature and to develop your written and oral expression of ideas through reading, vocabulary practice, discussion, and writing. Oral expression exercises will include class discussion, a staged reading of a play, a poetry recitation, and a brief oral presentation. Written expression exercises will focus on writing for different purposes, and will include practice with writing at several stages: annotated bibliography, crystallization of a thesis, development of an argument, synthesis, and editing. Grades will be based on reading and vocabulary quizzes, class participation (including the oral presentation and poetry recitation), writing assignments (3), and a take-home final. This course will be conducted in French.

Guillaume Ansart

Contes fantastiques et cruels/Introduction à la poésie

Introduction to reading and analyzing literature in French. We will read fantastic or cruel tales: a novella by Théophile Gautier, Jettatura, and short stories by Balzac (Sarrasine), Mérimée (La Vénus d'Ille), Flaubert (La Légende de Saint Julien l'Hospitalier), Villiers de l'Isle-Adam (L'Intersigne), Barbey d'Aurévilly (Le Bonheur dans le crime) and Maupassant; as well as short lyric poems by Hugo, Baudelaire, Verlaine, Rimbaud and Apollinaire. Course taught in French. Students will write a take-home paper (two versions) and take a midterm and a final exam.

Georgy Khabarovskiy

Le voyage dans la littérature française.

As a general introduction to French Literature, we will study texts belonging to the literary genres of poetry, novel, short story and theater. The class will focus on the various representations of traveling and travelers across the centuries. What motivates people to leave home and travel? How do travelers represent the people and the cultures that they encounter? What do journeys to other places teach us about ourselves and how do they change us? Is there an art of travel? These are some of the questions we will consider. In addition, we will look at the ways in which writers use the theme of traveling as a vehicle for conveying ideas about scientific, political, social, and existential issues.

Literary works to be studied include: the essay De la vanité by the 16th century writer and philosopher Michel de Montaigne, the short story Micromégas by Voltaire (1752), Pierre Loti’s novel Madame Chrysanthème (1887) centered around the love story of a Japanese woman and a French naval officer, and a 20th century play Le Malentendu by Albert Camus (1944). We will also read selected poems from different centuries.

The final grade will be based on active class participation and preparation, a few short essays and re-writes, an oral presentation, a midterm and a final exam. The course will be taught in French.

Nicolas Valazza

The Discovery of the New World

Europeans claim to have discovered the American continent in 1492, which was soon to be identified as the New World. Beyond its geographical aspect, this historical event carried such a strong cultural impact that the New World came to be seen, notably by writers, as the Other World, also considered the World of the Others, with all its historical, sociological, philosophical, but also fictional and metaphorical implications. Since then, and for centuries to come, writers have kept discovering the New World again and again, always lending to it new meanings.

In this course, we will read and analyze several texts belonging to different centuries and literary genres (essay, fiction, theatre and poetry) in which the topic of the New World is developed in various manners. Works studied include: 16th-century Chronicles of the New World, the essay Des cannibales by Montaigne, the 18th-century novel Candide by Voltaire, the 18th-century play L’Île des esclaves by Marivaux, a 19th-century anthology of poems and the 20th-century play La Controverse de Valladolid by Jean-Claude Carrière. We shall also have the chance to watch the film based on the latter play.

The final grade will be based on class preparation and participation (10%), two compositions (15% each), a mid-term exam (20%), an oral presentation (20%) and a final paper (20%). The course will be conducted entirely in French.

FRIT F305: Théâtre et Essai (3 cr.)
Jacques Merceron

NumberDaysTimeRoom
9206TR1:00-2:15BH 236

Prerequisite: F300

Jeux de rôles et drôles de jeux : l’identité remise en question

Qu’ils interviennent au sens propre ou au sens figuré, masques, déguisements, quiproquos, permutations de rôles ou encore mutations et métamorphoses plus radicales font souvent partie des ingrédients des meilleures pièces de théâtre, tant pour réjouir les spectateurs que pour jeter le trouble en eux. Mis en scène de façon comique, grotesque, subtile ou tragique, ces procédés ne laissent jamais indifférents dans la mesure où ils tendent à remettre en question ce qui apparaît comme le fondement de nos certitudes : l’identité des personnages et, partant, notre identité de spectateur. Face à ce jeu de miroirs déformants, on peut dès lors se demander à tout moment : qui parle vraiment ? Qui se dissimule ? Qui manipule qui ? Qui joue ? À quel jeu joue-t-on ? Pour examiner ces questions, nous lirons, analyserons et discuterons des pièces de théâtre allant du 17e au 20e siècle : Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme de Molière, Le Jeu de l’Amour et du Hasard de Marivaux, Le Barbier de Séville de Beaumarchais, Topaze de Marcel Pagnol et enfin Rhinocéros d’Eugène Ionesco. Le cours sera fait en français.

FRIT F306: Roman et Poésie (3 cr.)
Margaret Gray

NumberDaysTimeRoom
9979TR1:00-2:15SY 0008

Prerequisite: F300

Un jour
Un jour je m’attendais moi-même
Je me disais Guillaume il est temps que tu viennes
Pour que je sache enfin celui-là que je suis
Moi qui connais les autres
—Guillaume Apollinaire, « Cortège », Alcools (1913)

La Quête de l’Identité Dans ce cours consacré au thème de la recherche de l’identité, nous lirons trois romans du vingtième siècle, ainsi qu’une variété de poèmes du 20ème siècle. Dans le roman populiste Petit-Louis (1930) d’Eugène Dabit, nous constaterons le passage à l’âge d’homme vécu par un jeune soldat pendant la Grande Guerre (1914-1918), cataclysme dont le centenaire approche. Notre deuxième roman, un "polar," ou roman policier—Piège pour Cendrillon (1965) de Sébastien Japrisot—raconte une tentative mystérieuse de meurtre: crime qui mène à de profondes questions d’identité, car la survivante, amnésique, ne sait pas si elle est auteur ou victime du crime. Nous terminerons le semestre avec Anne Hébert, poète et romancière québécoise, dont Les chambres de bois (1958) racontent le conflit déclenché par des différences de classe sociale dans une culture coloniale traditionnelle et rigide : différences qu’un jeune aristocrate et une femme du peuple tentent de surmonter à travers leur amour. Intercalés parmi nos romans différents seront des poèmes postsymbolistes, surréalistes et anti-coloniaux de Guillaume Apollinaire, Jules Supervielle, Paul Eluard, Catherine Pozzi, Yves Bonnefoy, Philippe Jaccottet, Anne Hébert, et Aimé Césaire. La note finale sera pondérée comme suit : participation active à la discussion en classe (10%), participation régulière aux forums électroniques (10%) ; exposé oral (10%) ; examen partiel (« midterm ») (20%) ; dissertation de 7 pp (25%) ; examen final (25 %).

FRIT F310: Topics in French Culture
Tocqueville's America
(3 cr.)
Guillaume Ansart

NumberDaysTimeRoom
32953TR1:00-2:15BH 321

This course is joint-offerend with FRIT-F450 and is taught in English.

Alexis de Tocqueville's De la democratie en Amerique (1835-40, Democracy in America) has been called the greatest book ever written on America and on democracy. We will read it in its entirety, it contains brilliant insights on almost every page! Class discussions in English. F310 students: Readings and written work in English. F450 students: Readings and written work in French. Two exams and a paper.

FRIT F311: French and Francophone Studies in Film
French and European Cinema
(3 cr.)
Brett Bowles

NumberDaysTimeRoom
29095TR11:15-12:30BH 105

This course is joint-offered with CMCL-C398 and WEUR-W406.

This course offers an overview of the symbiotic evolution between European cinema and society from the silent era through the present, using representative films from France, Italy, Germany, Sweden, Spain, and the Soviet Union/Russia. We will approach film not only as an art form whose stylistic and technological dimensions have shifted over the past century, but as a collective representation that provides insight into social, political, and cultural issues. We will also investigate how cinema has shaped national identities and promoted both international competition and collaboration. In so doing, our study of film will naturally open onto a variety of other disciplines, such as history, economics, psychology, sociology, political science, and gender studies.

FRIT F313: Advanced Grammar (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
2972MWF10:10-11:00BH 138Aiko Okamoto-MacPhail
9980MWF12:20-1:10BH 105Eric MacPhail
2971MWF1:25-2:15BH 242Kelly Farmer

Prerequisite: F250

Aiko Okamoto-MacPhail

This course aims to a comprehensive improvement of French grammar combined with its end purpose of expressive skills with the emphasis on writing, which is necessary for the higher-level French courses.

To achieve this task, we use as textbook the third edition of French Grammar and Usage by Roger Hawkins & Richard Towell. This grammar book written in English is combined with the exercise book provided by the Course Packet and supplemented by on-line materials of exercises and especially with newspaper and videos, which will be combined with short written assignments in view of practicing grammar in actual expressions.

By the combination of short reading, practical exercises, and the grammar book study, the semester goal is to acquire and improve a grammatical instrument necessary for the upper-level courses through comprehensive strengthening of French language.

Eric MacPhail

This course has two aims: to summarize the grammar learned up to this level and to expand that knowledge of written and literary French grammar. In order to do so, we use Harper's Grammar of French by Samuel N. Rosenberg et al. and the exercise book. The semester goal is to give students a grammatical instrument in preparation for the reading-intensive courses at the F300 and 400 levels. The class will be graded through various types of small and big tests.

Kelly Farmer

This course is designed to (a) build upon the intermediate student's existing knowledge of major French grammar points through intensive study and (b) develop a more sophisticated mastery of advanced structures in preparation for F300 and beyond (including possible study abroad). By the end of this course, students should be able not only to speak and write more precisely on a range of topics but also to read and produce literary and academic writing with greater ease. We will supplement the text, Grammaire française (Ollivier & Beaudoin), with supplemental readings and materials from French and Francophone culture (e.g. newspaper and magazine articles, literary works, film). Grades will be based on daily preparation and homework, class participation, short writing assignments, quizzes, tests, and a cumulative final exam.

FRIT F315: Phonetics and Pronunciation (4 cr.)
Kevin Rottet

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructorNotes
2974MWF1:25-2:15BH 015Kevin RottetLecture
2975TR11:15-12:05SY 200Amber PanwitzDrill
2976TR1:25-2:15WY 111Amber PanwitzDrill

Prerequisite: F250

French F315 has three objectives: (1) to develop students' communicative skills by practice in listening comprehension and conversational practice; (2) to improve students' pronunciation accuracy and oral fluency and to train them to evaluate their own pronunciation; (3) to learn about the sound system and its role in the grammar and vocabulary of the language, and also as a marker of social and geographical identity. The focus will be on the pronunciation of Standard French, that is, the speech of the educated Parisian that serves as a model in the French speaking world. However, students will be introduced to salient features of other varieties of French.

The course meets five times weekly: two small practice sessions, two lectures, and one session of practice in the language lab under the supervision of the instructors or tutorial instruction. All components of the course are taught in French. Prerequisite is FRIT F 250 or equivalent. Choose one drill section to go with this lecture component.

FRIT F361: La France médiévale (jusqu’à 1500) (3 cr.)
Jacques Merceron

NumberDaysTimeRoom
29100TR2:30-3:45BH 332

Prerequisite: F300

Dans cette introduction historique à la civilisation française, nous étudierons la période qui s’étend de l’arrivée au pouvoir des dynasties mérovingienne et carolingienne des Ve-VIIIe siècles (Clovis ; Pépin le Bref, puis Charlemagne et ses fils) à la fin du XVe siècle. Le cours combinera la présentation des « événements historiques » et l’étude de l’évolution des institutions politiques, économiques et sociales (l’aspect artistique et culturel de cette période est traité dans un autre cours : F463). Le cours sera un mélange de : 1) mini-exposés du professeur ; 2) présentations-discussions de documents historiques et iconographiques ; 3) discussions de groupe. Le cours sera fait en français.

FRIT F362: La France 1500-1800 (3 cr.)
Hall Bjørnstad

NumberDaysTimeRoom
12094TR9:30-10:45SY 212

Prerequisite: F300

This introduction to the cultural history of France from the Renaissance to the Revolution will be structured around what are often considered as four significant historical turning points: the trauma of the Saint Bartholomew massacre and the religious wars; the heyday of absolutism under Louis XIV; the unfolding of the Enlightenment; and the turmoil of the French Revolution. The course will open with a survey of the whole period covered by the course, to provide the background for the subsequent focus on specific issues of the four historical moments, which will be examined in greater detail through primary and secondary texts, as well as films set in the period. The aim of the course is to foster (1) mastery of the matter (the story told), (2) awareness of the disciplinary tools/methods (how the telling of the story influences our perception of the events), (3) mastery of academic French (the language in which the story is told), (4) awareness of why the story matters. In order to realize these four aims, this class will rely heavily on different types of writing: weekly response papers, 3-4 short formal papers, scaffolded final writing portfolio. Furthermore, each student will work on a key concept as a subject of systematic reflection throughout the semester. The course will be conducted in French.

FRIT F375: Thèmes et Perspectives Littéraires
La France du 21e siècle
(3 cr.)
Audrey Dobrenn

NumberDaysTimeRoom
8624TR11:15-12:30KH 212

Prerequisite: F300 or equivalent.

In this class, we will see the ways French writers anticipate and describe the contemporary Western world. Incest, abortion, parenthood, male malaise, material culture and mass consumption are the key concerns of their work. We will see how female writers crudely detail intimate moments of a woman’s life the same way male authors have been writing about their experience of war in the past. Christine Angot’s Une semaine de vacances accounts for the incest she has been the victim of as a teenager (although she separates her personal experience with the act of writing). In l’évènement, Annie Ernaux shares with the public her abortion. Yasmina Reza’s play Le Dieu du carnage brings on the stage two sets of parents who came to discuss the unruly behavior of their children. Behind the humor of the play lies a strong critique of our contemporary culture. Finally, we will see how two male writers, Frederic Beigbeder and Michel Houellebecq, find two different ways to depict the loss of the meaning of masculinity in/and the hedonistic culture. In 99 francs, narrator Octave Parango, a successful copywriter highlights the absurdity of mass consumption, while L’extension du domaine de la lutte takes the reader to the deranged life of the narrator, his asexual life, his violence and his agonizing vision of contemporary human behaviors.

All of these books have been famous or (mainly) infamous at their publication for the severity of their subject and their realistic tone.

This course will continue to develop students’ skills in literary analysis, as well as to further strengthen their oral and written fluency in French, through close readings, engaged discussions and written assignments. The final grade for the course will be based on preparation for and participation in class, one oral presentation, a mid-term exam, a final exam and a short essay. Taught in French.

FRIT F399: Reading for Honors (1-12 cr.)
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
2977Arranged

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in French, contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Barbara Vance.

FRIT F424: Ideas and Culture in 17th Century France
Losing It: Chaos and Control in Early Modern France
(3 cr.)
Hall Bjørnstad

NumberDaysTimeRoom
29107TR11:15-12:30BH 016

The seventeenth century saw the rise of political absolutism in response to the chaos of civil war. However, the desire to exert control over the self (emotions, habits, ambitions etc.) and the body politic created tension and pressure that led to extravagant ways of "losing it." In this course we will examine the dynamic between the desire to control and inevitable chaos through a study of plays, fairytales, philosophical essays, fables and a novel. Weekly response papers, scaffolded final writing portfolio. The course will be conducted in French.

FRIT F450: Colloquium in French Studies—Traditions and Ideas
Tocqueville's America
(3 cr.)
Guillaume Ansart

NumberDaysTimeRoom
13048TR1:00-2:15BH 321

This course is joint-offered with FRIT-F 310.

Alexis de Tocqueville's De la democratie en Amerique (1835-40, Democracy in America) has been called the greatest book ever written on America and on democracy. We will read it in its entirety; it contains brilliant insights on almost every page! Class discussions in English. F310 students: Readings and written work in English. F450 students: Readings and written work in French. Two exams and a paper.

FRIT F460: La Francophonie nord-américain (3 cr.)
Julie Auger

NumberDaysTimeRoom
29118TR11:15-12:30BH 321

Ce cours retrace l’histoire des différentes communautés francophones du Canada et des États-Unis et examine les différentes manifestations des cultures qui s’y sont développées: leur langue, leur musique, leurs traditions, leur cuisine, leur littérature et leur cinéma. Il examine aussi l’impact que ces cultures exercent sur les communautés anglophones voisines.

FRIT F461: La France Contemporaine: Cinema et Culture (3 cr.)
Brett Bowles

NumberDaysTimeRoom
14023TR9:30-10:45BH 105

This interdisciplinary course traces the development of French cinema from its origins through the present using fourteen exemplary films. We will approach film not only as a form of art and as an expression of French cultural identity, but as an economic commodity, a tool of socio-political discourse, and a repository of collective memory. Methodologically, we will integrate theory with close analysis of the films’ form and content with contextual information related to their production, distribution, and reception. Assignments will include reading response papers, longer analytical essays, oral presentations, and active participation in discussions. The course will be taught in French and students will do all papers and exams in French, but all films will be subtitled in English. Readings for the course will be a mix of French and English.

FRIT F491: Elementary French for Graduate Students (4 cr.)
TBA

NumberDaysTimeRoom
2978TR7:15-8:45 pmBH 222

Open with consent of the instructor to undergraduates who have already completed the language requirement for the B.A. in another language. Introduction to structures of the language necessary for reading, followed by reading in graded texts of a general nature. No credit for the French major or minor. Credit given for only one of F491 or any French course at the 100 level.

FRIT F495: Individual Readings in French (1–3 cr.)
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
2980Arranged

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of this semester's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.

FRIT F499: Reading for Honors
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
2981Arranged

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in French, contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Barbara Vance.

Italian Courses

FRIT M100: Elementary Italian I (4 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
2988MTWR8:00-8:50BH 238Sara Della Valle
2989MTWR9:05-9:55BH 238Julide Etem
2990MTWR10:10-11:00BH 238Julide Etem
2991MTWR10:10-11:00FQ 012BAndrea Polegato
2992MTWR11:15-12:05BH 238Lucia Gemmani
2993MTWR12:20-1:10BH 238Andrea Polegato
2994 (CANCELLED)MTWR12:20-1:10SW 103
2995MTWR1:25-2:15SY 108Prof. Cara Takajian
2996MTWR1:25-2:15SW 103Anna Love
2997MTWR2:30-3:20SY 108Prof. Cara Takajian
2998MTWR2:30-3:20BH 238Anna Love
2999 (CANCELLED)MTWR4:40-5:30BH 238
3000TR7:15-8:45 pmWH 104Austin Alexander

Introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that develop grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Cultural topics and simple cultural comparisons are introduced. Credit given for only one of the following: M100, M110, M115, or M491.

FRIT M115: Accelerated Elementary Italian (4 cr.)
Carlotta Paltrinieri

NumberDaysTimeRoom
3001MTWR11:15-12:05SB 140

Prerequisite: Obtain authorization from department.

An accelerated treatment of material covered in both M100 and M150 designed for superior students and students with previous training in another foreign language. Credit given for only one of M115 and M100; Credit given for only one of M115 and M150. If interested, please fill out the online authorization form.

FRIT M150: Elementary Italian II (4 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
3002MTWR10:10-11:00BH 307Marianna Orsi
3003MTWR11:15-12:05BH 307Marianna Orsi
3005MTWR12:20-1:10BH 307Paola Marrero Hernandez
3004MTWR1:25-2:15BH 307Paola Marrero Hernandez

Prerequisite: M100.

Continued introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that build grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Practice with new cultural topics and basic cultural analysis. Credit given for only one of the following: M110, M115, M150, or M491.

FRIT M200: Intermediate Italian I (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
3007MWF10:10-11:00SB 140David Winkler
3008MWF12:20-1:10BH 314David Winkler
3009MWF1:25-2:15BH 229Laura Ponziani
3006MWF3:35-4:25WH 106Laura Ponziani
10981TR7:15-8:30 pmBH 237Alicia Vitti

Prerequisite: M110, M115, M150, or equivalent.

Building on Elementary Italian I and II, students further study and practice fundamental concepts and structures in Italian grammar. Through a variety of assignments and activities, they strengthen proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, writing, cultural analysis and understanding. Includes an introduction to brief literary texts. Credit given for only one of M200 or M215.

FRIT M215: Accelerated Second-Year Italian (4 cr.)
Karolina Serafin

NumberDaysTimeRoom
8760MTWR1:25-2:15BH 232

Prerequisite: M115 or equivalent (M100 and M150), and permission from department.

An accelerated treatment of material covered in both M200 and M250. Designed for students who have completed M115 and other highly motivated students, students with extensive experience with another language, and/or students who aspire to study abroad. Credit given for only one of the following: M215 or M200-M250.

Permission for M215 is based on previous performance in M115 or M150. If a student would like to take M215 as their first class at IU, then they should contact the instructor.

FRIT M222: The Obscenity of Power – The Works and Times of Niccoló Machiavelli (3 cr.)
Andrea Polegato

NumberDaysTimeRoom
TBAMW4:00-6:30SY 137

In Ancient Greek drama, potentially offensive topics, such as murder or sex, were typically depicted offstage. According to a popular tradition, the term ‘obscenity’ would take its derivation from this practice. Niccolò Machiavelli, the Renaissance political genius and author of the infamous The Prince (1513), is said have been the first to put the obscenity of power onstage, to ‘enter into evil’. In other words, he was the first to reveal how power actually works against a thousand-year-old political tradition, which focused in large part on praising a ruler's good virtues.

Celebrating the 500th anniversary of the writing of The Prince, this course will offer an overview of Machiavelli's life and works in the context of early sixteenth-century Italy. We will discuss his representation of power by reading a number of his more significant works: The Prince, the Discourses on Livy, the play Mandrake Root, and the short biographical account The Life of Castruccio Castracani of Lucca. We will also compare his political thought to current issues in American and Italian politics. Finally, we will watch a film related to this topic: The Profession of Arms (2001) by the Italian filmmaker Ermanno Olmi.

FRIT M235: Rome, The City and the Myth (3 cr.)
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDaysTimeRoom
29203TR1:00-2:15BH 140

In this class, we will examine how the city of Rome changes its historical, cultural, artistic and political status throughout the centuries, from ancient Rome to the present times. We will read historical sources, literary texts, analyze artistic works and view films related to the eternal city. One aspect will also focus on the presence of the Vatican State within the city of Rome and on the controversial role played by religion and political power in shaping the artistic and cultural setting of the city. The class will be subdivided into several sections, each one devoted to a theme and a cultural/ historical/ artistic aspect: e.g.: “Sport and Violence in Literature and Art;” “The Myth of the Foundation, "The Renaissance and its Cultural and Artistic Developments,” etc.

Students could be asked to read some material and screen extra footage/ films that may not be part of the main syllabus, but may be necessary to understand in depth some of the issues studied.

FRIT M250: Intermediate Italian II (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
3010MWF11:15-12:05BH 139Cara Takajian
3011MWF12:20-1:10BH 229Alicia Vitti
5820MWF2:30-3:20SY 103Alicia Vitti

Prerequisite: M200 or equivalent.

The study of more complex concepts and structures in Italian grammar. Through a variety of texts, media, and assignments, students practice listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and they analyze cultural topics and situations in greater depth. Increased attention to short literary texts. Credit given for only one of M250 or M215.

FRIT M300: Italian Conversation & Diction (3 cr.)
Colleen Ryan and Sandro Puiatti

NumberDaysTimeRoom
5821MTWRF10:10-11:00SW 103
12208MTWRF11:15-12:05SY 108

Prerequisite: M250, M215, or consent of instructor.

Conducted in Italian, this course continues the study of advanced structures through a variety of media and authentic texts. While the focus is on accuracy and fluency in speaking, practice with other skills and the study of Italian culture will be integrated throughout.

FRIT M307: Masterpieces of Italian Literature I (3 cr.)
H. Wayne Storey

NumberDaysTimeRoom
29210TR11:15-12:30BH 011

Study of language, texts, and cultural trends of representative works in medieval and early modern Italian literature as a base for advanced courses in Italian literature. Texts will include selections from Dante's Divina Commedia, Boccaccio's Decameron, Petrarch's Fragmenta, Ariosto's Orlando Furioso, Machiavelli's Principe, and Veronica Franco's Lettere. Prerequisite: M301 or consent of instructor.

FRIT M474: Temi e Versioni (3 cr.)
Marco Arnaudo

NumberDaysTimeRoom
32954TR2:30-3:45BH 221

This course is aimed at helping students improve their writing and reading skills in Italian, and develop a deeper appreciation for nuances and subtleties of the Italian language, both in its common usage and in its literary forms. To achieve this goal, we will engage in a variety of activities concerning reading, comprehension, spelling, vocabulary, writing, composition, and translation.

FRIT M491: Elementary Italian for Graduate Students (4 cr.)
Alicia Vitti

NumberDaysTimeRoom
3012TR7:15-8:45 pmBH 140

Open with consent of the instructor to undergraduates who have already completed the language requirement for the B.A. in another language. Introduction to the structures of the language necessary for reading, followed by reading in graded texts of a general nature. Credit given for only one of M491 and any Italian course at the 100 level.

FRIT M495: Individual Reading in Italian Literature (1-3 cr.)
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
3014Arranged

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of this semester's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.

FRIT M499: Reading for Honors
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
3015Arranged

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in Italian, contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Massimo Scalabrini.

Cross-Listed and Honors Courses

COLL C103: Critical Approaches to Arts and Humanities
A Question of Love
(3 cr.)
Emanuel Mickel

Lecture
NumberDaysTimeRoom
29788MW9:05-9:55BH 204

Discussion
NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructorNotes
29789F9:05-9:55AC C118David Wagner
33006F9:05-9:55BH 214Emanuel MickelHonors section
29790F10:10-11:00AC C118David Wagner
29791F12:20-1:10AC C114David Wagner

In the critical approaches course "A Question of Love" we shall explore our understanding of the various emotions and relationships we cover by the word love. As a basis for understanding the different aspects of love in human relationships as represented in western tradition, we shall read and analyze an anthology of fundamental passages from several classical and medieval works, ranging from Plato and the Bible to Ovid and the Romance of the Rose. We shall use our discussion of these texts to analyze the representations of love in two medieval romances, Chretien's Erec and Enide and Gottfried's Tristan; one seventeenth and one eighteenth century French novel, The Princess of Cleves and Dangerous Liaisons; and an English novel of Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility.

There will be three examinations during the semester including the final. Students will be asked to write two papers: one of two pages and one not more than three pages. In these papers students will learn to approach literary texts in a critical manner. Students taking this course for honors credit will write a fifteen-page paper in consultation with the instructor instead of the second three-page paper. Honors students will be expected to "discover" their own topic and create the outline. Meetings with the professor will help both in the "discovery" of the topic and in the drafting of an outline. In this course we shall discuss the psychology of love, the close relationship between love and philosophy, the question of love and chivalry in the Middle Ages, the importance of rhetoric and authorial use of persona. Analyzing these issues will add to the student's ability to understand the novel we shall read, to appreciate the many faceted aspects of the experiences we cover by the single word love, and to see the ways in which writers have represented these human emotions.

HON H234: Literature of Time and Place
The Pen and the Sword: Literature and Power in Early Modern Europe
(3 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDaysTimeRoom
13853TR2:30-3:45HU 217

What advice did the “murderous” Machiavelli give to the prince of Florence? Was the Renaissance courtier obliged to obey the prince even when asked to do shameful and dishonorable things? How do we protect ourselves from a bestial and cruel tyrant? Should we run as far as we can or should we fight back? Must we always tell the truth or do we have the right to hide our secret thoughts?

These are some of the questions addressed in this course, which focuses on the culture of the Italian Renaissance courts and the modern European national states. We will examine the complex relationship between literary creation and political power in an age that witnessed the origin of modern Absolutism in European history. How is poetry to preserve its inner freedom as well as its open access to truth in the context of absolute and ruthless political power? The dilemmas of caution and resoluteness, simulation and dissimulation, heroism and conformity will be considered as some of the forces shaping early modern European literature.

The goal of the course is to read some of early modern Europe’s most representative works, to understand them in their diverse historical contexts, and—on a more general note—to develop a critical approach to literary texts. We will study the cultural and political circumstances in which these works were produced and read, as well as the rhetorical and stylistic notions indispensable to an analytical understanding of them. A selection of relevant introductory and critical essays will also be discussed. In order to develop and exercise these analytical skills, the students will write three short essays, give an oral presentation, take five quizzes and a final exam.

Readings will include works by Dante, Ariosto, Machiavelli, Guicciardini, Castiglione, Della Casa, Montaigne, F. Bacon, Accetto, Gracián, La Rochefoucauld, La Bruyère and Alfieri.

Required Texts: N. Machiavelli, The Prince; F. Guicciardini, Maxims and Reflections; B. Castiglione, The Book of the Courtier; G. Della Casa, Galateo: A Renaissance Treatise on Manners. All other texts will be available in Oncourse.



French Courses

FRIT F100: Elementary French I (4 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
18149MTWR9:05-9:55BH 315Scott Cawthon
18153MTWR10:10-11:00BH 315Kelly Farmer
18150MTWR11:15-12:05BH 315Kelly Farmer
18151MTWR12:20-1:10BH 315Alan Ames
18152MTWR1:25-2:15BH 315Alan Ames
18154MW7:15-8:45 pmWH 008Kelly Kasper-Cushman

Introduction to French language and selected aspects of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of F100, F115, or F491.

FRIT F115: Accelerated Elementary French (4 cr.)
Amber Panwitz

NumberDaysTimeRoom
24725MTWR11:15-12:05AC C101

Prerequisite: Obtain authorization from department.

An accelerated treatment of material covered in both F100 and F150 designed for superior students and students with previous training in another foreign language. Credit given for only one of F115 and F100; Credit given for only one of F115 and F150. If interested, please fill out the online authorization form.

FRIT F150: Elementary French II: Language and Culture (4 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
18156 (cancelled)MTWR8:00-8:50
18157 (cancelled)MTWR9:05-9:55
18158MTWR10:10-11:00SY 006Jessica Tindira
18159MTWR10:10-11:00WH 104Renata Uzzell
18160MTWR11:15-12:05FQ 012BMargarita Madanova
18161MTWR12:20-1:10SY 006Jill Owen
18162MTWR1:25-2:15SY 006Erin Myers
18163MTWR2:30-3:20BH 315Jill Owen
18164MTWR2:30-3:20SY 006Jessica Tindira
18165MW7:15-8:45 pmBH 140Margarita Madanova
18166 (cancelled)TR7:15-8:45 pm

Prerequisite: F100.

Basic structures of the French language and selected topics of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of the following: F115, F150, or F491.

FRIT F200: Second-Year French I: Language and Culture (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
18173MWF8:00-8:50BH 332Noelle Lindstrom
18167MWF9:05-9:55BH 307Laura Demsey
18168MWF10:10-11:00BH 236Laura Demsey
18169MWF12:20-1:10BH 332Anemarie Calin
18170MWF1:25-2:15BH 322Emily O'Brock
18171MWF2:30-3:20BH 240George Khabarovskiy
18172MW7:15-8:30 pmWH 119George Khabarovskiy

Prerequisite: F150 or equivalent.

Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following third-semester courses: F200, F205, or F219.

FRIT F250: Second-Year French II: Language and Culture (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
18174MWF8:00-8:50BH 331Nicole Burkholder
18175MWF9:05-9:55BH 322Alisha Reaves
18176MWF10:10-11:00BH 233Martin Maillot
18179MWF11:15-12:05BH 322Cynthia Kanko
18177MWF1:25-2:15BH 214Cynthia Kanko
18181MWF1:25-2:15BH 015David Wagner
18178MWF2:30-3:20BH 214David Wagner
18180MWF3:35-4:25BH 315Sarah Kay Hurst
18182MW7:15-8:30 pmBH 337B. Devan Steiner
34801MW7:15-8:30 pmBH 245Krista Williams

Prerequisite: F200 or equivalent.

Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following fourth-semester courses: F250, F255, F265, or F269.

FRIT F300: Reading & Expression in French (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
18183TR9:30-10:45BH 240Aiko Okamoto-MacPhail
18184TR1:00-2:15WH 006Alison Calhoun
18185MWF2:30-3:20BH 236Erin Myers

Prerequisite: F250, F255, F265, or consent of department.

Aiko Okamoto-MacPhail

This course offers a general introduction to French literature through the reading of poetry, theater, and fiction. We will start the semester with poetry from the Course Packet. Each student will choose one poem and do an exposé in class and write an explication de texte. Then we advance to the 17th-century play by Jean Racine, Phèdre, and study the theater and the classic alexandrine verse which Racine perfected. We will read a picturesque short novel, Le château de Pictordu by a woman writer George Sand and two little known short stories by Gustave Flaubert, Un Parfum à sentir ou Les Baladins, and Passion et vertu. We end the semester with the twentieth-century author and Noble Prize winner André Gide’s Symphonie pastorale.

Alison Calhoun

The Figure of the Rebel in French Literature

A poet of evil, a polygamous knight errant, cruel aristocrats playing ruthless games with their lovers, and a murderer indifferent about his crime. These are among some of the rebellious authors or defiant characters we will explore in this thematic introduction to French literature. This course is meant to prepare you for coursework beyond the 300- level in French by expanding your knowledge of how to analyze texts and by continuing to reinforce the language skills you have begun to perfect. Our readings from diverse genres (novel, theater, poetry, short story, letters) will come from Montaigne’s Des Cannibales, Molière’s Dom Juan ou Le Festin de Pierre, Pierre Choderlos de Laclos’s Liaisons dangereuses, poems by Charles Baudelaire, poems by Arthur Rimbaud, and Albert Camus’ L’Etranger. Two films will also be part of our corpus: A Comédie Française recording of Molière’s Dom Juan, and Frears’ Liaisons dangereuses.

Erin Myers

Les femmes et la création du savoir sous l’ancien régime

Fontenelle, Newton, Descartes, Pascal, Voltaire, d’Alembert, Diderot : On reconnaît les grands noms de la physique, des mathématiques, de l’astronomie et de la philosophie. Par contre, les noms de Julie de l’Espinasse, Emilie du Châtelet, Anne de Gonzague de Clèves, et Louise Henriette (Sophie) Volland ne sont pas aussi connus. Ce cours propose d’aller à la rencontre des femmes réelles et fictives qui ont participé à la création du savoir scientifique et philosophique avant la Révolution. Quels étaient les apports particuliers des femmes et de la féminité ? Nous allons lire dans les mêmes genres de production écrite dans lesquels elles ont lu et écrit : des traités, essais, discours et rapports, des lettres philosophiques, des correspondances personnelles, et des portraits. En passant par le théâtre de Molière (Les Précieuses ridicules) nous aurons l’occasion de discuter des œuvres de Madeleine de Scudéry, la première romancière de l’ère moderne (titre controversé) qui a sans doute inspiré le personnage de Magdelon. Dans la même veine, nous découvrons des représentations filmiques de femmes philosophes sous l’Ancien Régime. Nous disposerons aussi des collections à la Lilly Library pour examiner des éditions originales du XVIIIe siècle.

La note finale sera répartie entre la lecture, d’une part – (interros de lecture et de vocabulaire, examen de mi-semestre) – et l’expression orale et écrite de l’autre (participation à la discussion en classe et sur les forums, une présentation orale et une composition écrite). Le cours sera mené en français.

FRIT F305: Théâtre et Essai: “Le poids de l’existence” (3 cr.)
Hall Bjørnstad

NumberDaysTimeRoom
24056TR9:30-10:45BH 214

What is the meaning of life? Does our existence have an obvious, pre-given purpose? If it has, how can it be that people don’t agree on this purpose? Is the purpose rather to search such for a meaning – or are these just the wrong questions altogether? Is the weight of these questions something we should embrace or escape? In this course we will study masterpieces from French literature that confront the question of the weight of existence in different ways. Alternating between early modern and 20th-century texts, we will explore essays by Montaigne, Pascal and Camus, and plays by Molière, Racine, Sartre and Beckett. The course will be writing-intensive and conducted seminar-style with focus on in-class discussion. Through our ongoing reflection and dialogue, the participants will improve (a) their skills as interpreters of French literature in general; (b) their grasp of the genres of the essay and theater in particular; (c) their mastery of academic French, both written and spoken. Course requirements include weekly response papers, three 2-page papers and final portfolio with rewrites of these. All class discussion, reading, and writing will be done in French.

FRIT F306: Roman et Poésie (3 cr.)
Margaret Gray

NumberDaysTimeRoom
18186TR1:00-2:15SY 212

« Histoires d’amour, en prose et en vers »

Dans ce cours qui traite de l’amour--de ses idéaux et ses trahisons, de ses réussites et ses échecs--nous lirons trois romans du vingtième siècle, ainsi qu’une variété de poèmes. Nous commencerons par un « polar », ou roman policier : Piège pour Cendrillon (1965) de Sébastien Japrisot, récit d’une tentative mystérieuse de meurtre. A l’intérieur des conventions mêmes du genre policier, pourtant, une histoire d’amour se profile presque trop discrètement. Passant ensuite à un roman québécois--Les chambres de bois (1958) d’Anne Hébert--, nous constaterons le conflit déclenché par des différences de classe sociale dans une culture traditionnelle et rigide : différences qu’un jeune aristocrate et une femme du peuple tentent de surmonter à travers leur amour. Nous terminerons le semestre avec une autofiction de Marguerite Duras--L’Amant (1984)--, inspiré d’une liaison que l’auteur a vécue pendant son adolescence en Indochine française : relation qui met en jeu des différences de race, de classe sociale, et de nationalité, dans un contexte colonial et exotique. Notre étude de L’Amant sera amplifiée et interrogée par une comparaison avec certaines scènes du film du même titre. Intercalés parmi nos romans différents seront des poèmes de la Renaissance (Louise Labé), du 19ème siècle (Baudelaire) et du 20ème siècle (Jules Supervielle, Catherine Pozzi, Guillaume Apollinaire, Louis Aragon, Paul Eluard, Anne Hébert). La note finale sera pondérée comme suit : participation active à la discussion en classe (10%), participation régulière aux forums électroniques (10%) ; exposé oral (10%) ; examen partiel (« midterm ») (20%) ; dissertation (25%) ; examen final (25 %).

FRIT F313: Advanced Grammar (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
18187MWF9:05-9:55BH 214Kelly Farmer
18188MWF11:15-12:05BH 219Barbara Vance
24147MWF12:20-1:10BH 236Eric MacPhail

Prerequisite: F250

Kelly Farmer

This course is designed to (a) build upon the intermediate student’s existing knowledge of major French grammar points through intensive study and (b) develop a more sophisticated mastery of advanced structures in preparation for F300 and beyond (including possible study abroad). By the end of this course, students should be able not only to speak and write more precisely on a range of topics but also to read and produce literary and academic writing with greater ease. We will supplement the text, Grammaire française (Ollivier & Beaudoin), with supplemental readings and materials from French and Francophone culture (e.g., newspaper and magazine articles, literary works, film). Grades will be based on daily preparation and homework, class participation, short writing assignments, quizzes, tests, and a cumulative final exam.

Barbara Vance

F313 builds students' understanding of advanced aspects of French grammar and their facility in applying this understanding to written and oral expression. We will supplement the text Grammaire Française (Ollivier) with exercises (online and others) based on various materials from French and francophone everyday society, including e.g. cross-cultural studies, journalism, and film.

Eric MacPhail

This course has two aims: to summarize the grammar learned up to this level and to expand that knowledge of written and literary French grammar. In order to do so, we use Harper's Grammar of French by Samuel N. Rosenberg et al. and the exercise book. The semester goal is to give students a grammatical instrument in preparation for the reading-intensive courses at the F300 and 400 levels. The class will be graded through various types of small and big tests.

FRIT F316: Conversational Practice (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
18193MWF10:10-11:00BH 321Audrey Dobrenn
18191MWF11:15-12:05BH 018Jamie Root
26422MWF12:20-1:10KH 200Mark Black
18192MWF1:25-2:15KH 200Loïc Lerme
18190TR7:15-8:30 pmWH 116Rodica Frimu

Prerequisite: F250 or F255.

Recent and classic award winning feature length French films (comedies, dramas, thrillers) provide the basis for vocabulary expansion, in-class discussion and debates, and an increased understanding of various French cultural and historical issues, including immigration, WWII, regional differences, and religious conflict. Class time will maximize speaking opportunities. Grading is based on in-class participation, presentations, and oral and written exams. NOTE: Students are required to watch the films outside of class (on-line streaming).

FRIT F317: French in the Business World (3 cr.)
Guillaume Ansart

NumberDaysTimeRoom
18194TR2:30-3:45SY 002

Introduction to the language of business activities in France and to the structure and functioning of various aspects of contemporary French economic life. Awareness of the general cultural context within which business activities take place in France will also be an important dimension of the course. Weekly exercises will include oral activities as well as reading and writing (translation, reading of articles from French newspapers and magazines on current economic issues, etc). Course taught in French. No previous knowledge of the world of French business is required.

FRIT F363: La France 1800-Aujourd'hui (3 cr.)
Oana Panaïté

NumberDaysTimeRoom
30367TR11:15-12:30BH 307

Prerequisite: F300.

The course is a broad introduction to major moments in French politics, society and culture from the aftermath of the 1789 Revolution to the postcolonial era. Key moments include the First and Second Empire, Romanticism, the Paris Commune, the Dreyfus Affair, Impressionism, First and Second World Wars, feminism, May 1968, decolonization, immigration, and France's role in the European Union.

FRIT F375: Thèmes et Perspectives Littéraires (3 cr., 1st 8 weeks)
Paolo Tortonese

NumberDaysTimeRoomNotes
23683TR1:00-3:15PY 1131st 8 weeks only

L’amour et l’argent dans la littérature française, de Prévost à Zola

La rencontre inopportune de l’amour et de l’argent est mise en scène par des romans centrés sur le personnage de la prostituée. Qu’il s’agisse de la grande courtisane ou de la « fille » racolant dans la rue, de la lorette ou de la demi-mondaine, ou encore de la prostituée enfermée dans la maison close, la femme qui vend son corps est un personnage éminent de la littérature française. Nous suivrons son évolution à travers des extraits de plusieurs œuvres : d’abord du roman Manon Lescaut, de l’abbé Prévost, qui met en place toutes les ambiguïtés du personnage, insaisissable mélange d’amour et d’inconstance. Puis nous rencontrerons la courtisane romantique de Victor Hugo, Marion Delorme, protagoniste d’un drame fondateur, où l’immense générosité de la femme perdue semble racheter ses péchés, et, à sa suite, La dame aux camélias, qui va jusqu’au sacrifice pour sauver son amant. Aux antipodes de ces héroïnes, nous verrons La Fille Élisa, des frères Goncourt, et Nana, de Zola : prostituées du bordel ou de la rue, condamnées à la déchéance rapide ou à la conquête des hautes classes, symboles de la pourriture qui gagne le corps social du prolétariat jusqu’aux élites. Et nous conclurons avec Maupassant, peintre du bordel (La Maison Tellier) et portraitiste d’une dernière figure héroïque de prostituée (Boule de suif).

Parallèlement à la lecture de ces œuvres littéraires, nous prendrons connaissance de quelques ouvrages sociologiques et médicaux du XIXe siècle sur la prostitution, ainsi que de quelques ouvrages critiques d’aujourd’hui.

FRIT F399: Reading for Honors (1-12 cr.)
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
18195Arranged

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in French. See the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Barbara Vance.

FRIT F401: Structure and Development of French (3 cr.)
Kevin Rottet

NumberDaysTimeRoom
18196TR9:30-10:45BH 015

This course provides an overview of the structure of present day French, a perspective on its historical development, and an analysis of some of the current language-related issues in the French-speaking world. We will first consider the history of Modern French from an external perspective, by examining some important historical events in the history of the language, and from an internal perspective, by looking at some of the specific ways the language has changed over time. Then we will talk about variation in French, or how French differs geographically (i.e. dialects and regional varieties in France and in the French-speaking world), how it differs socially (i.e. how social categories such as socioeconomic class or sex are reflected in language use), and how it differs situationally (i.e. how people change the ways they speak depending on who they're talking to, the formality of the situation, etc.). Along the way we will look at spoken versus written French, slang, and français populaire. Next we will discuss directions for the future: how French creates new words (neologisms), copes with English influence (Anglicisms), and addresses issues concerning the feminization of the names of occupations traditionally practiced by males.

FRIT F451: French Studies-Literature and Arts (3 cr.)
Eric MacPhail

NumberDaysTimeRoom
30371MWF1:25-2:15BH 137

Raymond Queneau en prose et en vers

This course samples the poems, essays, and novels of the 20th-century French author Raymond Queneau, best known for the movie adaptation of his novel Zazie dans le métro. Throughout his career, Queneau was fascinated by the possibility of emulating speech in writing and he called his experimental language le néo-français. In addition to reading interviews and essays on this topic, as well as verse experiments in neo-French, we will read three novels that reflect different aspects of his genius. Loin de Rueil reflects Queneau’s fascination with the cinema and the role of the imagination in fiction and reality. It also includes a notable interview conducted in “Hollywood” French. Les fleurs bleues features two characters who exist in each other’s dreams, one in the present and one in the past who voyages through time to rejoin his double in the present. Le vol d’Icare, Queneau’s last novel, tells the story of a fictional character who escapes from a novel and sets off a paradoxical manhunt that highlights the autonomy of fiction. Students will prepare an in-class presentation, write and rewrite an expository essay, and take a final exam. The class will be given in French.

FRIT F455: Le Roman au 20e Siecle (3 cr.)
Margaret Gray

NumberDaysTimeRoom
30375TR 4:00-5:15 SY 200

« Politique des Femmes Ecrivains »

Ce cours se propose d’étudier les interrogations menées par diverses romancières—à l’intérieur comme à l’extérieur de l’Hexagone—de leurs propres cultures. Avec La Vagabonde de Colette (1910), nous étudierons la recherche—audacieuse et courageuse à cette époque--d’une indépendance littéraire, sentimentale, et financière chez une jeune actrice de music-hall. Ayant fui un mariage malheureux, la narratrice doit s’affronter à une culture encore peu habituée aux femmes seules et professionnelles. Dans Les belles images (1966) de Simone de Beauvoir, nous scruterons une critique de la société technocrate et consommatrice d’après-guerre, et surtout son impact sur une nouvelle classe de femmes professionnelles. Nous nous trouverons ensuite en Belgique avec Jacqueline Harpman, dont le roman Orlanda (1996) reprend le topos de la dystopie de façon assez subtile—à travers l’histoire d’une héroïne professionnelle qui jouit d’une carrière réussie, tout en étant consciente d’un certain manque, un certain vide : roman qui résume et réunit ces questions d’identité, d’altérité et de transformation à travers une relation qui se noue entre deux parties d’une même personne, la timide Aline et son outrageux double masculin, Orlanda. Nous terminerons le semestre avec Comment Cuisiner son Mari à l’Africaine (2000) de Calixthe Beyala, récit situé dans le Paris contemporain et hybride de l’immigration, et qui évoque la lutte entre un passé traditionaliste et un présent rempli de fausses solutions. A travers ces lectures différentes, nous serons attentifs aux capacités de la fiction de représenter et de critiquer les cultures de nos écrivain(e)s; aux façons dont le pouvoir (politique, social, sexuel, culturel, racial) et ses diverses formes sont étudiés dans ces textes; aux stratégies de résistance, voire d’opposition, personnelle et collective qui y sont explorées; et aux aspects formels de ces textes littéraires. Seront demandés : une participation active à la discussion en classe (10%) ; des réponses écrites aux lectures (10%) ; un exposé oral (10%) ; un examen partiel (« midterm ») (20%) ; une dissertation (25%) ; un examen final (25 %).

FRIT F492: Reading French for Graduate Students (4 cr.)
Carly Bahler

NumberDaysTimeRoom
18197TR7:15-8:45 pmBH 135

Prerequisite: F491 or consent of department. Open with consent of the instructor to undergraduates who have already completed the B.A. language requirement in another language.

Continuation of language and reading development from F491. Credit given for only one of F492 or any of the following: F150, F169, F200, F205, or F219.

FRIT F495: Individual Readings in French
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
18199Arranged

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of this semester's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.

FRIT F499: Reading for Honors
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
18200Arranged

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in French. See the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Eric MacPhail.

Italian Courses

FRIT M100: Elementary Italian I (4 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
18205MTWR9:05-9:55WH 104Andrea Polegato
18207MTWR11:15-12:05WH 104Sara Dallavalle
18209MTWR12:20-1:10WH 104Alicia Vitti
18208MTWR1:25-2:15WH 104Sara Dallavalle
18206MW7:15-8:45 pmBH 233Anna Love

Introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that develop grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Cultural topics and simple cultural comparisons are introduced. Credit given for only one of the following: M100, M110, M115, or M491.

FRIT M115: Accelerated Elementary Italian (4 cr.)
Karolina Serafin

NumberDaysTimeRoom
18210MTWR11:15-12:05WY 111

Prerequisite: Obtain authorization from department.

An accelerated treatment of material covered in both M100 and M150 designed for superior students and students with previous training in another foreign language. Credit given for only one of M115 and M100; Credit given for only one of M115 and M150. If interested, please fill out the online authorization form.

FRIT M150: Elementary Italian II (4 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
18211 (cancelled)MTWR8:00-8:50
18213MTWR10:10-11:00FQ 012BJulide Etem
18214MTWR11:15-12:05BH 135Lucia Gemmani
22231MTWR11:15-12:05SY 006Austin Alexander
18215MTWR12:20-1:10BH 135Austin Alexander
20709MTWR1:25-2:15BH 135Lucia Gemmani
18216MTWR2:30-3:20BH 135Cara Takakjian
18217MW7:15-8:45 pmBH 214Laura Ponziani

Prerequisite: M100.

Continued introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that build grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Practice with new cultural topics and basic cultural analysis. Credit given for only one of the following: M110, M115, M150, or M491.

FRIT M200: Intermediate Italian I (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
18218 (cancelled)MWF9:05-9:55
18219MWF11:15-12:05BH 307Alicia Vitti
24726MWF1:25-2:15BH 240Paola Marrero Hernandez

Prerequisite: M110, M115, M150, or equivalent.

Building on Elementary Italian I and II, students further study and practice fundamental concepts and structures in Italian grammar. Through a variety of assignments and activities, they strengthen proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, writing, cultural analysis and understanding. Includes an introduction to brief literary texts. Credit given for only one of M200 or M215.

FRIT M215: Accelerated Second-Year Italian (4 cr.)
Cara Takakjian

NumberDaysTimeRoom
23424MTWR1:25-2:15BH 231

Prerequisite: M115 or equivalent (M100 and M150), and consent of instructor.

An accelerated treatment of material covered in both M200 and M250. Designed for students who have completed M115 and other highly motivated students, students with extensive experience with another language, and/or students who aspire to study abroad. Credit given for only one of the following: M215 or M200-M250.

FRIT M222: Topics in Italian Culture (3 cr.)
Marco Arnaudo

NumberDaysTimeRoom
26213TR11:15-12:30BH 214

Italians at War

This course explores representations of war in Italian literature, film, and culture, with examples drawn from antiquity to the 20th century. Each representation will be placed in its proper historical context and compared with the actual historical events it portrays. In English.

FRIT M222: Topics in Italian Culture (2nd 8 weeks; 3 cr.)
Cara Takakjian

NumberDaysTimeRoom
35139TR4:00-6:30pmSY 210

Sex, Fumetti and Rock n' Roll: Italian Pop Culture of the 1960s

Across Europe and the United States, the period of 1968 was a time of social and political revolution. In Italy, the era’s turbulence can be felt most resoundingly in pop cultural works, from fumetti (comics) to film to music. In this course, we will analyze Italian graphic novels, feature films, and popular music from the years 1967-1969 in order to understand how cultural production both reflected this moment in Italian history and functioned as a significant instrument of change.

FRIT M236: Dante's Divine Comedy (3 cr.)
H. Wayne Storey

NumberDaysTimeRoom
31193TR2:30-3:45BH 317

A thorough reading of Dante’s influential masterpiece of retributive justice in its historical and cultural contexts, including Dino Compagni’s unfinished and subsequently suppressed chronicle of Florence up to the death of Henry VII, as well as the artistic movements, economics, ethics, and politics of his day, which still influence Italian society.

FRIT M250: Intermediate Italian II (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
22779MWF9:05-9:55JH A107Alicia Vitti
18220MWF10:10-11:00BH 140Alicia Vitti
18221MWF1:25-2:15BH 236Adriana Varela
18222MWF2:30-3:20BH 015Adriana Varela

Prerequisite: M200 or equivalent.

The study of more complex concepts and structures in Italian grammar. Through a variety of texts, media, and assignments, students practice listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and they analyze cultural topics and situations in greater depth. Increased attention to short literary texts. Credit given for only one of M250 or M215.

FRIT M301: Italian Reading & Expression (3 cr.)
Karolina Serafin

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
20585MTWRF10:10-11:00LH 019Sandro Puiatti
26628MTWRF11:15-12:05LH 019Carlotta Paltrinieri

Prerequisite: M250 or consent of instructor.

In this course students will learn to analyze texts from the main literary genres (lyric poetry, epic poetry, narrative, theater, songs, cinema) using specialized vocabulary, basic literary tropes and rhetorical figures, and basic principles of poetic rhyme and meter. Students will also improve their skills and deepen their understanding of intermediate and advanced grammar structures through daily practice in speaking and writing activities about the texts at hand and other cultural topics. Learning objectives for this course include a demonstrated ability to read and write analytically with greater accuracy and ease, and to speak and listen with greater fluency and confidence about literary and other cultural (musical, visual, journalistic) texts. Conducted in Italian.

FRIT M308: Masterpieces of Italian Literature II (3 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDaysTimeRoom
29310TR4:00-5:15BH 314

The focus of this course is on the literature of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. Its goal is to read some of modern Italy’s most representative works, to understand them in their diverse historical contexts, and to develop a critical approach to literary texts. Special attention will be paid to such topics as the Enlightenment, Romanticism, Verism, the symbolist movement and its legacy, the avant-guards, war and literature, Fascism and literature, and contemporary literature. Students will write three short essays during the term, participate in an oral presentation, take five quizzes and a final exam. The class will be conducted in Italian.

FRIT M311: Italian Film and Culture (3 cr.)
Antonio Vitti

NumberDaysTimeRoomNotes
27350TR1:00-2:15BH 233

Modern Italian Cinema: A Never-Ending Challenge

This course is a survey of Italian cinema from the nineties to the present. It analyzes works by a number of different directors; including well known directors such as Bertolucci, Bellocchio, Amelio, Salvatores, Moretti, Sorrentino, Garrone and Muccino whose films are representative of sociopolitical trends in the Italian culture of the time. Students will learn how to do critical reading of visual texts, and will be provided with cinematic terminology and a recent bibliography on the subject. Special attention is devoted to new Italian comedy, new authors and the phenomenon of neo-neorealism.

Students view ten films in Italian with subtitles. The format includes lectures, screenings, and in-class discussions

This course is taught in English. Joint-offered with CMCL-C398 abd WEUR-W406.

FRIT M455: Readings in the Italian Cinema (3 cr.)
The New Maestri of Italian Cinema

Antonio Vitti

NumberDaysTimeRoomNotes
29318TR11:15-12:30SY 210

This course will study the major developments of contemporary Italian cinema. Important full-length feature films by Gianni Amelio, Matteo Garrone, Nanni Moretti, Gabriele Salvatores, Giuseppe Tornatore, Paolo Sorrentino, Paolo Virzì, Michelangelo Frammartino, Roberta Torre, Cristina Comencini, Francesca Archibugi, Carlo Verdone and Silvio Soldini will be studied and discussed from different perspectives. Students will learn how to read a film and write short reviews.

Taught in Italian.

FRIT M492: Readings in Italian for Graduate Students (CANCELLED) (4 cr.)
Alicia Vitti

NumberDaysTimeRoom
18223TR

Prerequisite: M491 or consent of department.

Open with consent of the instructor to undergraduates who have already completed the B.A. language requirement in another language. Continuation of language and reading development from M491. Credit not given for both M492 and either of the following: M150 or M200.

FRIT M495: Individual Reading in Italian Literature (1-3 cr.)
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
18225Arranged
26917Arranged

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of this semester's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.

FRIT M499: Reading for Honors
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
18226Arranged

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in Italian. See the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Massimo Scalabrini.

Honors and Cross-Listed Courses

COLL C103: Cloak & Dagger (3 cr.)
Marco Arnaudo

Lecture

NumberDaysTimeRoom
26503TR10:10-11:00BH 310

Discussion (choose one)

NumberDayTimeRoomInstructor
26527F10:10-11:00BH 319Marianna Orsi
30513F10:10-11:00BH 215David Winkler
26526F1:25-2:15BH 315Marianna Orsi
30515F1:25-2:15WH 204David Winkler
26525F2:30-3:20WH 204David Winkler
30514F2:30-3:20BH 315Marianna Orsi

This course introduces students to one of the most basic concepts of literary criticism - literary genres - with specific reference to a popular genre such as the so-called "thriller." "Thriller" is a term that came into use in the late nineteenth century and was applied not only to the detective story, the most famous examples of which were A. Conan Doyle's tales about Sherlock Holmes, but also to a closely related literary genre, the spy novel, that also attained great popularity during the period.

The primary focus of this course will be to teach students how to understand the conventions and traditions that govern any literary genre, with specific reference to the "thriller" as exemplified by selected detective and spy stories in both literature and film. Attention will be paid to critical concepts such as style, form, structure, point of view, and implied reader, in order to provide students with analytical tools that will be valuable in the years to come. It is my hope that students will apply the lessons they learn about genre in this class to any literary genre, not only genres typical of popular culture.

Readings will include the detective fiction of Poe, Conan Doyle, Agatha Christie, Raymond Chandler, and Friedrich Dürrenmatt. We will also examine several detective-mystery movies, including the recent Sherlock Holmes (2009), and the classic masterpieces of the noir tradition, including The Maltese Falcon and The Big Sleep. For the spy genre, we will read the pre-Cold War novel A Coffin for Dimitrios, a James Bond novel by Ian Fleming, and a Cold War spy novel by John Le Carré. In addition, we will screen two very different James Bond films: one made during the height of the Cold War, and Martin Campbell's Casino Royale (2006).



First Six-Week Session
Tuesday, May 13—Friday, June 20

FRIT F100: Elementary French I (4 cr.)
Georgy Khabarovskiy

NumberDaysTimeRoom
8659MTWRF12:20-2:00BH 317

Introduction to French language and selected aspects of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of F100, F115, or F491.

FRIT F200: Second-Year French I: Language and Culture (3 cr.)
Renata Uzzell

NumberDaysTimeRoom
8661MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 319

Prerequisite: F150 or equivalent. Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following third-semester courses: F200, F205, or F219.

FRIT F250: Second-Year French II: Language and Culture (3 cr.)
Rodica Frimu

NumberDaysTimeRoom
8662MTWRF12:45-2:00BH 319

Prerequisite: F200 or equivalent. Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following fourth-semester courses: F250, F255, F265, or F269.

FRIT F491: Elementary French for Graduate Students
Mark Black

NumberDaysTimeRoomNotes
8664MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 305Undergraduates only

Although this course is designed for graduate students who seek to develop reading knowledge of French, it is also open to undergraduate students. However, it will not count toward the French major or minor, and it will not count toward fulfilling the undergraduate language requirement. The course provides an introduction to structures of the language necessary for reading, followed by reading in graded texts of a general nature. Credit given for only one of F491 or any French course at the 100-level.

FRIT F495: Individual Readings in French (1-3 cr.)
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
8668Arranged

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of the department's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.

FRIT M250: Intermediate Italian II (CANCELLED) (3 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoom
10777 (CANCELLED)MTWRF12:45-2:00BH 247

Prerequisite: M200 or equivalent. The study of more complex concepts and structures in Italian grammar. Through a variety of texts, media, and assignments, students practice listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and they analyze cultural topics and situations in greater depth. Increased attention to short literary texts. Credit given for only one of M250 or M215.

FRIT M495: Individual Readings in Italian Literature (1-3 cr.)
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
8676Arranged

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of the department's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.

Second Six-Week Session
Monday, June 23—Friday, August 1

FRIT F150: Elementary French II: Language and Culture (4 cr.)
Laura Demsey

NumberDaysTimeRoom
8660MTWRF12:20-2:00BH 317

Prerequisite: F100. Basic structures of the French language and selected topics of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of the following: F115, F150, or F491.

FRIT F250: Second-Year French II: Language and Culture (3 cr.)
Noelle Lindstrom

NumberDaysTimeRoom
8663MTWRF12:45-2:00BH 206

Prerequisite: F200 or equivalent. Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following fourth-semester courses: F250, F255, F265, or F269.

FRIT F492: Reading French for Graduate Students
Carly Bahler

NumberDaysTimeRoomNotes
8666MTWRF11:00-12:15BH 319Undergraduates only

Prerequisite: F491 or consent of department. Although this course is designed for graduate students who seek to develop reading knowledge of French, it is also open to undergraduate students. However, it will not count toward the French major or minor, and it will not count toward fulfilling the undergraduate language requirement. The course includes a continuation of language and reading development from F491.

FRIT F495: Individual Readings in French (1-3 cr.)
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
8669Arranged

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of the department's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.

FRIT M100: Elementary Italian I Online Course (4 cr.)

NumberNotes
15311Online course
16216Online course

This beginning Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The class meets with the instructor online twice a week; meeting hours are flexible. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar focuses on present and simple past tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency, employing basic conversational strategies

FRIT M495: Individual Readings in Italian Literature (1-3 cr.)
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
8677Arranged

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of the department's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.



French Courses

FRIT F100: Elementary French I (4 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructorNotes
8451MTWR8:00-8:50WH 119Devan Steiner
8453MTWR9:05-9:55WH 119Devan Steiner
8455MTWR10:10-11:00WH 119Sara Leslie
8456MTWR11:15-12:05FQ 012BAmanda Vredenburgh
8458MTWR12:20-1:10WH 119Flavien Falantin
8459MTWR1:25-2:15WH 119Flavien Falantin
8460MTWR1:25-2:15SY 106Kelly Farmer
8461MTWR1:25-2:15SY 108Amanda Vredenburgh
8457MTWR2:30-3:20SY 106Kelly Farmer
8462MTWR2:30-3:20WH 119Adeline Bordenave
8452MTWR4:40-5:30WH 119Christina Steinman
8464MW7:15-8:45 pmBH 135Kelly Farmer

Introduction to French language and selected aspects of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of F100, F115, or F491. Watch video

Course supervisor: Kelly Farmer

FRIT F102: Beginning French Conversation I (1 cr.)
Kelly Sax

NumberDay/Time
30772Arranged

Corequisite: F100.

This companion course to F100 gives beginning students the opportunity to practice conversational French in a relaxed setting with peers. Led by advanced students of French working under faculty guidance, group activities may include discussion, games, magazine/newspaper/movie discussions, cultural events, cooking, etc. S/F grading. No credit for French major.

FRIT F115: Accelerated Elementary French (4 cr.)
Alisha Reaves

NumberDaysTimeRoom
8465MTWR10:10-11:00KH 200
14997 [CANCELLED]MTWR11:15-12:05KH 200

Prerequisite: Obtain authorization from department.

An accelerated treatment of material covered in both F100 and F150 designed for superior students and students with previous training in another foreign language. Credit given for only one of F115 and F100; Credit given for only one of F115 and F150. If interested, please fill out the online authorization form.

FRIT F150: Elementary French II: Language and Culture (4 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
8466MTWR8:00-8:50SY 106Sarah Kay Hurst
8467MTWR9:05-9:55SY 106Jennifer Misran
8468MTWR10:10-11:00SY 106Sarah Kay Hurst
8469MTWR11:15-12:05SY 106Alan Ames
8470MTWR12:20-1:10SY 0006Jennifer Misran
8471MTWR1:25-2:15SY 0006Scott Cawthon
8472MTWR1:25-2:15SY 006Alan Ames
8473MTWR2:30-3:20SY 0006Jennifer Misran
8474TR7:15-8:45 pmBH 332Scott Cawthon

Prerequisite: F100.

Basic structures of the French language and selected topics of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of the following: F115, F150, or F491.

Course supervisor: Jennifer Misran

FRIT F152: Beginning French Conversation II (1 cr.)
Kelly Sax

NumberDay/Time
30778Arranged

Corequisite: F150.

This companion course to F150 gives beginning students the opportunity to practice conversational French in a relaxed setting with peers. Led by advanced students of French working under faculty guidance, group activities may include discussion, games, magazine/newspaper/movie discussions, cultural events, cooking, etc. S/F grading. No credit for French major.

FRIT F200: Second-Year French I: Language and Culture (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
8475MWF8:00-8:50JH A107Jessica Tindira
8476MWF9:05-9:55BH 345Jessica Tindira
8478MWF10:10-11:00BH 147Rodica Frimu
8477MWF11:15-12:05BH 149Laura Demsey
8480MWF12:20-1:10SY 210Cynthia Kanko
8481MWF1:25-2:15BH 149Rodica Frimu
8483MWF2:30-3:20BH 345Laura Demsey
8484MWF2:30-3:20BH 245Renata Uzzell
8482MWF4:40-5:30BH 314Renata Uzzell
8485MW7:15-8:30 pmBH 237Jill Owen
8486TR7:15-8:30 pmBH 231Jill Owen

Prerequisite: F150 or equivalent.

Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following third-semester courses: F200, F205, or F219.

Course supervisor: Rodica Frimu

FRIT F202: Intermediate French Conversation I (1 cr.)
Kelly Sax

NumberDay/Time
30784Arranged

Corequisite: F200.

This companion course to F200 gives intermediate students the opportunity to practice conversational French in a relaxed setting with peers. Led by advanced students of French working under faculty guidance, group activities may include discussion, games, magazine/newspaper/movie discussions, cultural events, cooking, etc. S/F grading. No credit for French major.

FRIT F250: Second-Year French II: Language and Culture (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
8488MWF9:05-9:55BH 245Noëlle Lindstrom
8489MWF10:10-11:00BH 307Noëlle Lindstrom
36042MWF10:10-11:00SY 0006Jamie Root
8490MWF12:20-1:10BH 345Aiko Okamoto-MacPhail
8491MWF1:25-2:15BH 147George Khabarovskiy
8492MWF2:30-3:20BH 322George Khabarovskiy
8487MWF3:35-4:25BH 015Martin Maillot
8493MW7:15-8:30 pmBH 336Martin Maillot
20380TR7:15-8:30 pmBH 333Jamie Root

Prerequisite: F200 or equivalent.

Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following fourth-semester courses: F250, F255, F265, or F269.

Course supervisor: Kelly Sax

FRIT F252: Intermediate French Conversation II (1 cr.)
Kelly Sax

NumberDay/Time
30792Arranged

Corequisite: F250.

This companion course to F250 gives intermediate students the opportunity to practice conversational French in a relaxed setting with peers. Led by advanced students of French working under faculty guidance, group activities may include discussion, games, magazine/newspaper/movie discussions, cultural events, cooking, etc. S/F grading. No credit for French major.

FRIT F265: Accelerated Second-Year French (4 cr.)
Rodica Frimu

NumberDaysTimeRoom
30800MTWR 11:15-12:05SY 0006

Prerequisite: Obtain authorization from department.

An accelerated treatment of material covered in both F200 and F250. Grammar, composition, and conversation coordinated with readings of short texts. Students who complete F265 cannot also receive credit for F200 or F250. If interested, please fill out the online authorization form.

FRIT F300: Reading & Expression in French (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructorNotes
8494
31304
TR9:30-10:45GY 436Emanuel MickelRegular section
Honors section
14155MWF10:10-11:00WH 009Vincent Bouchard
8497MWF11:15-12:05WH 008Vincent Bouchard
8496TR11:15-12:30SY 200Oana Panaïté
14808TR1:00-2:15SY 001Margaret Gray
8495TR2:30-3:45GY 436Guillaume Ansart

Prerequisite: F250, F255, F265, or consent of department.

Emanuel Mickel

Students will read an anthology of French poetry and a play, Le jeu de l'amour et du hasard, and Manon Lescaut. We shall begin the semester with the poetry learning how to read and analyze poems using the explication de texte method. Both the play and the novel illustrate the struggle between the intellect and the senses, a dominant theme in Western European literature. Le jeu de l'amour et du hasard has fun with the classic tradition and makes a play of words on philosophy and love. Manon Lescaut is certainly within the classic tradition but on the cusp of Romanticism as the young chevalier meets a different kind of woman.

Each student getting honors credit will give a brief (10 minutes) "explication" in French. Students will also write a paper in French. Honors students will write two five-page papers in French. There will be two one-hour exams and a two-hour final.

Vincent Bouchard

Ce cours propose une exploration historique, géographique et culturelle de l'Amérique du Nord francophone à travers des représentations littéraires ou audiovisuelles. Partant de la période coloniale (la Nouvelle-France et la Louisiane) jusqu'à l'époque contemporaine, nous verrons comment différentes communautés francophones (les Acadiens, les Créoles, les Canadiens français, les Québécois, etc.) ont inventé de nouvelles manières de vivre en fonction du contexte nord américain et en relation avec d'autres groupes : les britanniques, les protestants anglophones, les indiens, les métis, etc. Nous examinerons la place de ces 'Américains', minoritaires dans un continent principalement anglophone, et nous étudierons les spécificités de leurs cultures.

Oana Panaïté

Manger, boire et aimer en littérature et au cinéma

Ce cours d’introduction à la littérature et au cinéma en français offre aux étudiants l’occasion de perfectionner leur français écrit et oral, d’améliorer leurs capacités analytiques et de se familiariser davantage avec la culture française et francophone à travers les trois thèmes riches et complémentaires de la nourriture, de la boisson et de l’amour. Nous étudierons des œuvres classiques, comme celles de Jean de La Fontaine, Charles Baudelaire, Arthur Rimbaud, et modernes, créées par le Sénégalais Léopold-Sédar Senghor, la Camerounaise Léonora Miano et le réalisateur belge Gérard Corbiau. La moyenne finale sera calculée à partir des critères suivants : la présence et la participation (20%) ; une présentation orale (20%) ; deux travaux écrits (20%) et leurs corrigés (30%) ; un examen partiel (10%).

Margaret Gray

An introduction to French literature, this course has three goals: a) to provide further exposure to a variety of literary genres in French, including poetry, theatre, the novel and the short story b) to develop and sharpen reading skills through practice in close reading and techniques of literary analysis c) to foster student progress in practical skills such as aural and written comprehension, as well as oral and written expression. Beginning with poetic texts of the Renaissance in the Petrarchan tradition, we will analyze the reprise and transformation of these forms in the Romantic lyrics of the nineteenth century, as well as their subsequent post-Symbolist ironizations. We will then proceed with our study of irony in the context of a different genre, theatre—as we see that Jean Anouilh’s manipulation of the ideal of romantic love in Bal des Voleurs becomes a vehicle for powerful social critique. Turning to the more intimate account of a first-person narrative, we will follow the adventures, setbacks, hopes, sorrows and joys recounted in Camara Laye’s coming-of-age novel, or “roman d’apprentissage”: L’enfant noir. The semester will conclude with a selection of short stories illuminating thematic and formal issues, from problems of moral responsibility (Albert Camus) to voice (Henri Thomas) and point of view (Jean-Louis Curtis). Exercises will include an in-class writing assignment, a midterm exam consisting of quotations to analyze and an essay question, a paper of literary analysis and a comprehensive final exam. One more thing: you have just had your last contact with English.

Guillaume Ansart

Contes fantastiques et cruels/Introduction à la poésie

Introduction to reading and analyzing literature in French. We will read fantastic or cruel tales: a novella by Théophile Gautier, Jettatura, and short stories by Balzac (Sarrasine), Mérimée (La Vénus d'Ille), Flaubert (La Légende de Saint Julien l'Hospitalier), Villiers de l'Isle-Adam (L'Intersigne), Barbey d'Aurévilly (Le Bonheur dans le crime) and Maupassant; as well as short lyric poems by Hugo, Baudelaire, Verlaine, Rimbaud and Apollinaire. Students will write a take-home paper (two versions) and take a midterm and a final exam.

FRIT F305: Théâtre et Essai (3 cr.)
Guillaume Ansart

NumberDaysTimeRoom
14356TR11:15-12:30WH 008

Prerequisite: F300

We will read great plays from the 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th centuries, as well as major essays about the theater. The course grade consists of two papers and two exams. Reading list:

  • Theater: Corneille, L’Illusion comique ; Molière, Tartuffe, Le Misanthrope ; Racine, Phèdre ; Marivaux, Le Triomphe de l’amour ; Rostand, Cyrano de Bergerac ; Ionesco, Rhinocéros ; Genet, Les Bonnes
  • Essays: Corneille, Discours sur les trois unités ; Rousseau, Lettre à d’Alembert sur les spectacles ; Stendhal, Racine et Shakespeare ; Hugo, Préface de Cromwell ; Artaud, Le Théâtre et son double

FRIT F306: Roman et Poésie (3 cr.)
Nicolas Valazza

NumberDaysTimeRoom
14998TR1:00-2:15JH A105

Prerequisite: F300

Exile and Exoticism

The fascination for the unknown place has always played a prominent role in literature. At least since Ulysses’ peregrinations in his attempt to go back to Ithaca, as they are recounted by Homer in the Odyssey, the remote place has never ceased to provide writers with themes to unfold in their works. Yet this fascination is often of an ambivalent nature, for the enthusiasm that usually characterizes the discovery of a new place is frequently counterbalanced by a sense of nostalgia. Moreover, if many writers and literary characters were eager to leave home in order to travel the world and to relate their experiences, many others, on the contrary, were forced to depart from their place of origin and take the road of exile, sometimes finding in writing the only link with their native place.

In this course, we will study the ambivalence of feelings that an unknown place is likely to provoke in writers, by reading several narratives and a selection of poems that develop the motifs of exoticism and/or exile. Authors considered include Marco Polo, Diderot, Voltaire, Chateaubriand, Hugo, Senghor, Le Clézio, Djebar, among others.

The final grade will be based on class preparation and participation (10%), a mid-term exam (25%), an oral presentation (25%) and a final paper (40%). The course will be conducted in French.

FRIT F311: French and Francophone Studies in Film (3 cr.)
Brett Bowles

NumberDaysTimeRoom
17911TR11:15-12:30BH 229

This course is joint-offered with CMCL-C398 and WEUR-W406.

Marginality in Contemporary French Cinema

Historically, France has long boasted one of the highest standards of living in the world and formed one of the most culturally cohesive nations. Yet over the past twenty-five years the country has struggled with economic stagnation, a high unemployment rate, and increasing social disunity—problems that have generated criticism not only of social institutions and structures, but normative cultural priorities and values. Articulated around a dozen films made since 1985, this course approaches film as a form of social and political critique, linking cinematic form and narrative style to historical context and ongoing debates over race, gender, religion, and class. This course will be taught in English, with all readings in English. Films will be in French with English subtitles.

FRIT F313: Advanced Grammar (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
8499MWF10:10-11:00BH 345Aiko Okamoto-MacPhail
14999MWF12:20-1:10BH 245Eric MacPhail
8498MWF2:30-3:20BH 214Alison Calhoun

Prerequisite: F250

Aiko Okamoto-MacPhail

This course has two aims: to summarize the grammar learned up to this level and to practice and expand that knowledge to a higher level of French grammar. The textbooks used in class are the second edition of Contrastes by Denise Rochat and its workbook available both on-line and in the printed workbook. The semester goal is to give students a grammatical instrument in preparation for the courses at the 300 and 400 levels.

Eric MacPhail

This course has two aims: to summarize the grammar learned up to this level and to expand that knowledge of written and literary French grammar. In order to do so, we use Harper's Grammar of French by Samuel N. Rosenberg et al. and the exercise book. The semester goal is to give students a grammatical instrument in preparation for the reading-intensive courses at the F300 and 400 levels. The class will be graded through various types of small and big tests.

Alison Calhoun

The approach this course will take to advanced French grammar will be a fast-paced review of the material you have already covered coupled with an intensive study of that grammar in a literary and critical context supplied in our textbook as well as students' own writing. This course uses QUIA, meaning weekly grammar exercises are completed online, giving students instantaneous feedback on their progress. The goal of the course is to serve either as a complimentary grammar course to be taken simultaneously with F300 or as a springboard course preparing the student for F300 and beyond. Course grades will be based on the best 10 of 12 weekly quizzes (50%), a midterm (15%), a final (20%) and class preparation (15%).

FRIT F315: Phonetics and Pronunciation (4 cr.)
Kevin Rottet

Lecture

NumberDaysTimeRoom
8500MW
F
1:25-2:15BH 219
BH 115

Drill (choose one)

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
8502TR1:25-2:15OP 107
8501 [CANCELLED]TR7:15-8:05 pmBH 206

Prerequisite: F250

French F315 has three objectives: (1) to develop students' communicative skills by practice in listening comprehension and conversational practice; (2) to improve students' pronunciation accuracy and oral fluency and to train them to evaluate their own pronunciation; (3) to learn about the sound system and its role in the grammar and vocabulary of the language, and also as a marker of social and geographical identity. The focus will be on the pronunciation of Standard French, that is, the speech of the educated Parisian that serves as a model in the French speaking world. However, students will be introduced to salient features of other varieties of French.

The course meets five times weekly: two small practice sessions, two lectures, and one session of practice in the language lab under the supervision of the instructors or tutorial instruction. All components of the course are taught in French. Choose one drill section to go with this lecture component.

FRIT F361: La France médiévale (jusqu’à 1500) (3 cr.)
Jacques Merceron

NumberDaysTimeRoom
17914TR1:00-2:15BH 149

Prerequisite: F300

La France médiévale (Histoire et Société jusqu’à 1500)

Dans cette introduction historique à la civilisation française, nous étudierons la période qui s’étend de l’arrivée au pouvoir des dynasties mérovingienne et carolingienne des Ve-VIIIe siècles (Clovis ; Pépin le Bref, puis Charlemagne et ses fils) à la fin du XVe siècle. Le cours combinera la présentation des « événements historiques » et l’étude de l’évolution des institutions politiques, économiques et sociales (l’aspect artistique et culturel de cette période est traité dans un autre cours : F463/1). Le cours sera un mélange de : 1) mini-exposés du professeur ; 2) présentations-discussions de documents historiques et iconographiques, ainsi que d’extraits de vidéos ; 3) discussions de groupe. Le cours sera fait en français.

Devoir et notation : 1) contrôle continu (5 ‘quizzes’) : 25% ; 2) participation orale active et continue : discussions et présentation (cela pourra aussi comporter la préparation de questions écrites, tapées à la machine, en vue d’une discussion) : 25% ; 3) composition écrite en français : 25% ; 4) examen final : 25%.

FRIT F375: Thèmes et Perspectives Littéraires (3 cr.)
Margaret Gray

NumberDaysTimeRoom
13817TR9:30-10:45BH 246

Prerequisite: F300 or equivalent.

Littérature et adaptation cinématique

A travers l’étude comparée d’œuvres littéraires et certaines des adaptations cinématiques qu’elles ont inspirées, ce cours se propose de poursuivre une méditation sur l’interprétation : ses possibilités, ses défis, ses limites, ses pièges. « Interpréter un texte », disait Roland Barthes, «ce n’est pas lui donner un sens […] c’est au contraire apprécier de quel pluriel il est fait » (S/Z). Qu’est-ce qui fonde et justifie une interprétation légitime? Par contre, quand est-ce qu’une interprétation « trahit » son texte ? A partir de l’étude d’œuvres prises dans quatre genres différents—légende, théâtre, roman, roman court (« novella »), et conte--, nous nous pencherons surtout sur des problèmes d’interprétation textuelle. Puisque toute adaptation cinématique dramatise l’acte d’interprétation, nous testerons nos conclusions en étudiant des extraits des films inspirés par nos œuvres. Il y aura une variété d’exercices à l’oral et à l’écrit, dont un exposé, une rédaction, un examen partiel (« midterm ») et un exercice de fin de semestre. Au programme :

  • Légende : Le roman de Tristan et Iseut, édition de Joseph Bédier (1900)
    Film : « L’Eternel retour », réalisé par Jean Delannoy sur un scénario de Jean Cocteau (1943)
  • Théâtre : Cyrano de Bergerac, Edmond Rostand (1897)
    Films :« Roxanne », sur un scénario de Steve Martin (1987)
    « Cyrano de Bergerac », Jean-Paul Rappeneau (1990)
  • Roman: Le blé en herbe, Colette (1922)
    Film : « Le blé en herbe », Claude Autant-Lara, 1954
  • Nouvelle : Le Silence de la mer, Vercors (1942)
    Film : « Le Silence de la mer », Jean-Pierre Melville (1947)
  • Conte : « La belle et la bête », Mme LePrince de Beaumont, 1757)
    Film : « La Belle et la Bête », Jean Cocteau (1946)

FRIT F399: Reading for Honors (1-12 cr.)
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
8503Arranged

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in French, contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Barbara Vance.

FRIT F402: Introduction to French Linguistics (3 cr.)
Kelly Sax

NumberDaysTimeRoom
30807TR1:00-2:15BH 331

All students must have taken French through at least the F313 level (or have special permission from the instructor).

FRIT F423: 17th Century French Literature (3 cr.)
Alison Calhoun

NumberDaysTimeRoom
30814MW4:00-5:15SW 103
Obscenity in Early Modern France

We need not look far to find examples in American popular culture of our discomfort in the face of sexuality and the question of sexual indecency. Whether we are remembering Clinton's relationship with Lewinski, films like Brüno and Borat, Tiger Woods's infidelities, Janet Jackson's so-called "wardrobe malfunction" at the Super Bowl, we are constantly proving our obsession with defining and judging, most often censuring, what might fall under the category of the "obscene."

In this advanced French literature course, focusing on the seventeenth-century, we will take advantage of the fact that these same preoccupations proliferated in the early modern period, notably at a time when pornography (iconographical and literary) was regaining its place in society. We will read and analyze several authors writing in varying genres (comedy, tragi-comedy, short stories, letters, dialogues) in which the themes of sexual taboo, provocation, and desire are diversely articulated. We will additionally read current articles that dialogue with these works of literature, helping us understand their relevance to contemporary debates about obscenity. Grades will be based on rough and final drafts of two papers (15% per draft and 25% per final paper) as well as student preparation (10%) and the presentation of one of your paper topics in class (10%). This course will be taught entirely in French. The seminar will include visits to the Kinsey Institute.

FRIT F443: Great Novels of the 19th Century (3 cr.)
Nicolas Valazza

NumberDaysTimeRoom
30821TR2:30-3:45JH A105
The Figure of the Painter in the 19th-Century French Novel

In this course, we will read some key novels of the 19th century—Le Chef-d’œuvre inconnu by Honoré de Balzac, La Toison d’or by Théophile Gautier, L’Œuvre by Émile Zola and À rebours by Joris-Karl Huysmans—focusing on the figure of the painter as a literary character. The purpose of the course is to examine how the art of painting unveils some unexpected aspects of the art of the novel, while also unfolding some essential literary issues of the century: the status of the artist in society, the role of the woman in the novel, realist and naturalist esthetics, the emergence of symbolism and the question of decadence, etc. Our readings will be supported by visual examples taken from painters mentioned or implied in the novels: Édouard Manet, Paul Cézanne, Gustave Moreau, among others.

The final grade will be based on class preparation and participation (10%), a mid-term composition (25%), an oral presentation (25%) and a final essay (40%). The course will be conducted in French.

FRIT F450: Colloquium in French Studies—Traditions and Ideas [CANCELLED] (3 cr.)
Vincent Bouchard

NumberDaysTimeRoom
17270CANCELLED
Les cultures populaires francophones

Ce cours vise à aborder la culture des pays francophones à travers le prisme de l'usage populaire de divers media : la parole, la musique, la machine à coudre, le théâtre, le cinéma, la bande dessinée, la télévision, le téléphone, l'Internet, etc. Avant d'être recyclées par les artistes et les musiciens du Pop Art et de devenir une culture de masse (Adorno, 1991), les cultures populaires constituaient la partie visible de manières de faire (de Certeau, 1980) inventées par une communauté afin de s'adapter à un contexte géo-sociologique et de répondre à ses principaux besoins (la survivance et la transmission). Tout en explorant cette transition, nous nous intéresserons à des objets de nature très diverse : la cuisine, les régionalismes, la musique, l'architecture, les faits de société, le dessin, les représentations audiovisuelles, etc. Le cours est organisé en trois parties : les techniques du corps ; les arts mécaniques ; les techniques électriques (Mauss, 1936). Dans chacune des parties, nous voyagerons dans les trois continents de la Francophonie : l'Afrique, l'Amérique du Nord et l'Europe.

FRIT F477: French Conversation Group Leadership (1 cr.)
Kelly Sax

NumberDay/Time
30828Arranged

Note: Contact Kelly Sax for permission to enroll in the course.

Under the guidance of their instructor, advanced students of French facilitate weekly French conversation groups for lower level students. Leaders are responsible for planning all group sessions, including discussion topics generated by magazine/newspaper articles and movies, and activities such as games and cooking. No credit for French major. May be repeated for a total of 4 credit hours.

FRIT F491: Elementary French for Graduate Students (4 cr.)
TBA

NumberDaysTimeRoom
8504TR7:15-8:45 pmBH 237

Open with consent of the instructor to undergraduates who have already completed the language requirement for the B.A. in another language. Introduction to structures of the language necessary for reading, followed by reading in graded texts of a general nature. No credit for the French major or minor. Credit given for only one of F491 or any French course at the 100 level.

FRIT F495: Individual Readings in French (1–3 cr.)
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
8506Arranged

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of this semester's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.

FRIT F499: Reading for Honors
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
8507Arranged

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in French, contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Barbara Vance.

Italian Courses

FRIT M100: Elementary Italian I (4 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructorNotes
8514MWR8:00-8:50BH 135Roberto BorfecchiaOnline componenta
8515MWR9:05-9:55BH 135Roberto BorfecchiaOnline componenta
8516MWR10:10-11:00BH 135Iuri MoscardiOnline componenta
8517MWR10:10-11:00FQ 012BLisa DolasinskiOnline componenta
8518MWR11:15-12:05BH 135Stefano D'AlessandroOnline componenta
8519MWR12:20-1:10BH 135Lino MioniOnline componenta
8521MWR1:25-2:15BH 135Chris LaceyOnline componenta
8523MWR2:30-3:20BH 135Letizia MontroniItalian theater themeb
8524MWR2:30-3:20SY 108Lino MioniOnline componenta
8526TR7:15-8:45 pmWH 119Alicia VittiNo online componentc
33177Online - CANCELLED 8/12/14Online coursed

Introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that develop grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Cultural topics and simple cultural comparisons are introduced. Credit given for only one of the following: M100, M110, M115, or M491.

a This is a computer enhanced course, which is a combination of traditional classroom time and online instruction. The course meets in class Monday, Wednesday and Thursday and involves independent work by students, a portion of which will be performed online. During the semester, students perform a variety of tasks to practice speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on present and simple past tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency, employing basic conversational strategies.

b This is a computer enhanced course, which is a combination of traditional classroom time and online instruction. The course meets in class Monday, Wednesday and Thursday and involves independent work by students, a portion of which will be performed online. The course covers the same grammar and vocabulary of a normal M100 course, but content will focus on Italian theater. Students will act out scenes and learn about Italian culture through theater. Students will practice all four basic language skills: speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on present and simple past tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency, employing basic conversational strategies.

c This evening section of M100 relies less on computer-based learning than the daytime hybrid sections, while still taking advantage of the enhancements available through the online components of the textbook. During the semester, students perform a variety of tasks to practice speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on present and simple past tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency, employing basic conversational strategies.

d This beginning Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The class meets with the instructor online once a week; meeting hours are flexible. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar focuses on present and simple past tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency, employing basic conversational strategies.

FRIT M110: Italian Language through Opera (3 cr.)
Lucia Gemmani

NumberDaysTimeRoom
34012MTWR11:25-12:05WH 119

This intensive beginning course covers the material of two semesters in one (M100 & M150). This course is intended for people who want to study Italian and are interested in opera and operatic world. The material and assessments will focus on Italian opera, but students will learn today's Italian spoken language. The course meets four times a week and also involves independent work by students, a portion of which will be performed online. During the semester, students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on present, past and future tenses, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency. The course is fast-paced and very rewarding. It is recommended for students with previous experience learning foreign languages (specifically Romance languages). If interested, please fill out the online authorization form.

FRIT M115: Accelerated Elementary Italian (4 cr.)
Letizia Montroni

NumberDaysTimeRoom
8527MTWR11:15-12:05WH 006

Prerequisite: Obtain authorization from department.

This intensive beginning course covers the material of two semesters in one (M100 & M150). The course meets four times a week and also involves independent work by students, a portion of which will be performed online. During the semester students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on present, past and future tenses, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency. The course is fast-paced it and very rewarding. It is recommended for students with previous experience learning foreign languages (specifically Romance languages). If interested, please fill out the online authorization form.

FRIT M150: Elementary Italian II (4 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructorNotes
8528MWR10:10-11:00SY 108Adriana VarelaOnline componenta
8529MWR11:15-12:05SY 108Adriana VarelaOnline componenta
8531 [CANCELLED]MWR12:20-1:10SY 108Online componenta
8530MWR1:25-2:15BH 206Karolina SerafinOnline componenta
33178OnlineKarolina SerafinOnline courseb

Prerequisite: M100.

Continued introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that build grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Practice with new cultural topics and basic cultural analysis. Credit given for only one of the following: M110, M115, M150, or M491.

a This is a computer enhanced course, which is a combination of traditional classroom time and online instruction. The course meets in class Monday, Wednesday and Thursday and involves independent work by students, a portion of which will be performed online. This course follows M100 and continues to present the beginning-level concepts of Italian language and culture. During the semester students perform a variety of tasks to practice speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The grammar focuses on past and future tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences with accuracy and fluency about familiar topics.

b This second-semester Italian course is interactive and conducted completely online. The students do not need to be on campus in order to participate. It requires students to work independently and follow a very structured syllabus. The class meets with the instructor online once a week; meeting hours are flexible. The students are involved in a variety of online tasks such as reading, listening, completing exercises, posting writing assignments and recording responses. All the activities are integrated into a larger cultural context. The grammar focuses on past and future tense, allowing the students to speak and write in simple sentences about familiar topics with accuracy and fluency.

FRIT M200: Intermediate Italian I (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
8533MWF10:10-11:00JH A107Lucia Gemmani
8534MWF12:20-1:10WH 106David Winkler
8535MWF1:25-2:15BH 148David Winkler
8532MWF3:35-4:25BH 214Austin Alexander
15842TR7:15-8:30 pmBH 222Austin Alexander

Prerequisite: M110, M115, M150, or equivalent.

This course meets three times a week and is a continuation of Elementary Italian II. In class the students concentrate on reviewing and refining structures learned at the 100-level, but this time at an intermediate level. During the semester students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in cultural context. The course features study of original Italian short movies that offer the first stimulus for learning intermediate-level vocabulary, grammar and culture. Credit given for only one of M200 or M215.

FRIT M215: Accelerated Second-Year Italian (4 cr.)
Mary Migliozzi

NumberDaysTimeRoom
13947MTWR1:25-2:15WH 006

Prerequisite: M115 or equivalent (M100 and M150), and permission from department.

This intensive intermediate-level Italian course covers the material of two semesters in one (M200 & M250). The course builds upon the first three semesters of beginning Italian (or equivalent) adding the unique feature of short films as the first stimulus for learning intermediate-level vocabulary, grammar, and cultural concepts. The various activities aim to strengthen proficiency in listening, speaking, reading and writing, and students will gain the ability to understand, evaluate, compare, and appreciate many aspects of Italian culture. The course is fast-paced and very rewarding. It is recommended for students with previous experience learning foreign languages (specifically Romance languages). Students must be recommended for this course by their Italian instructor in M150 or M115, or meet with the instructor for permission. Credit given for only one of the following: M215 or M200-M250.

FRIT M222: Topics in Italian Culture (3 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDaysTimeRoom
20420TR11:15-12:30BH 247
The Cultures of the Italian Renaissance

The aim of this course is to provide a clear and comprehensive picture of what the Italian Renaissance was. We will first try to understand historically the core event of the Renaissance—the rediscovery and conscious imitation of ancient Greek and Latin languages, literatures, and cultural artifacts—and we will then analyze the ways in which this rebirth fundamentally changed the languages, literatures, arts, philosophies, and politics of Italy at the dawn of the modern era. A key concern will be to demonstrate that while the Renaissance was ‘elitist’ in that only a few highly educated people could engage in this revolution, it produced far-reaching consequences in the way we speak, read, write, and study languages, literatures, and cultures. Students will write two short essays, take six quizzes and a final exam.

FRIT M250: Intermediate Italian II (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
8536MWF11:15-12:05BH 148Mary Migliozzi
11217MWF2:30-3:20BH 240Mary Migliozzi

Prerequisite: M200 or equivalent.

This second-year Italian course meets three times a week and builds upon the first three semesters of beginning and intermediate Italian (or equivalent). In M250, students concentrate on learning how to express their ideas and debate the pros and cons of certain situations as well as to offer advice and express opinions on a variety of familiar subjects, all in the Italian language. The students are involved in a variety of tasks practicing speaking, writing, listening and reading in a cultural context. The course includes study of original Italian short movies that offer the first stimulus for learning intermediate-level vocabulary, grammar and culture.

FRIT M300: Italian Conversation & Diction (3 cr.)

NumberDaysTimeRoom
11218MTWRF10:10-11:00ED 3284
16767MTWRF11:15-12:05ED 3284

Prerequisite: M250, M215, or consent of instructor.

Conducted in Italian, this course continues the study of advanced structures through a variety of media and authentic texts. While the focus is on accuracy and fluency in speaking, practice with other skills and the study of Italian culture will be integrated throughout.

FRIT M307: Masterpieces of Italian Literature I (3 cr.)
H. Wayne Storey

NumberDaysTimeRoom
17995TR2:30-3:45BH 319

Prerequisite: M301 or consent of instructor.

Study of language, texts, and cultural trends of representative works in medieval and early modern Italian literature as a base for advanced courses in Italian literature. Texts will include selections from Dante's Divina Commedia, Boccaccio's Decameron, Petrarch's Fragmenta, Ariosto's Orlando Furioso, Machiavelli's Principe, and Veronica Franco's Lettere.

FRIT M463: Contemporary & Popular Italian Culture (3 cr.)
Antonio Vitti

NumberDaysTimeRoomNotes
30912TR
T
9:30-10:45
7:15-9:30 pm
AD A151
CH 001
Lecture
Film showings
Academy Award-Winning Italian Films

28 Italian films have been nominated for Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, and 13 films have won the award. Among all countries that have submitted films for the award, Italy ranks first in terms of the number of films that won, and second in terms of the number of nominees.

In M463, we will study the 13 films that have won the award from cinematic, cultural, historical and interdisciplinary perspectives. Special attention will be given to the Italian directors who won multiple awards: Federico Fellini and Vittorio De Sica. Fellini received four awards for La strada, Le notti di Cabiria, 8 ½, and Amarcord, the most in the history of the Academy. De Sica received two Honorary Awards prior to the conception of the formal award for Shoeshine and The Bicycle Thief, and two actual Academy Awards for Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow and The Garden of the Finzi-Continis.

We will also study Elio Petri’s Indagine di un cittadino al di sopra di ogni sospetto, Tornatore’s Nuovo Cinema Paradiso, Bertolucci’s The Last Emperor (an English-language film that won 9 Oscars), Salvatores’ Mediterraneo, Benigni’s La vita è bella and Sorrentino’s La grande bellezza.

Students interested in technical aspects of filmmaking can also research the 33 technical awards won by Italian art directors, directors of photography, make-up artists, designers, musicians, set designers, and costumes designers. We may also examine the many Italian actors and actresses who won awards for leading or supporting roles, and the Italian screenplay writers nominated for Oscars.

FRIT M491: Elementary Italian for Graduate Students (4 cr.)
Alicia Vitti

NumberDaysTimeRoom
8538TR7:15-8:45 pmWH 116

Open with consent of the instructor to undergraduates who have already completed the language requirement for the B.A. in another language. Introduction to the structures of the language necessary for reading, followed by reading in graded texts of a general nature. Credit given for only one of M491 and any Italian course at the 100 level.

FRIT M495: Individual Reading in Italian Literature (1-3 cr.)
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
8540Arranged

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of this semester's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.

FRIT M499: Reading for Honors
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
8541Arranged

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in Italian, contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Massimo Scalabrini.

Interdisciplinary Courses

FRIT G275: Thematic Studies (2nd 8 weeks; 3 cr.)
The Art and Fiction of War: Variations and Representations of a Model
Marco Arnaudo

NumberDaysTimeRoom
30905TR8:00-10:30HH 406

In this class we will use Machiavelli’s theories of warfare as a modern political tool as a reference point to analyze representations of war as a theme in fiction. Representations of war discussed in this class will span through different media, periods, and genres, and they will include texts such as Garibaldi's Autobiography, Stephen Crane's The Red Badge of Courage, Emilio Lussu's A Soldier on the Southern Front, and Kurt Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse-Five. In English.

COLL C103: Critical Approaches to Arts and Humanities
A Question of Love
(3 cr.)
Emanuel Mickel

Lecture

NumberDaysTimeRoom
18465MW9:05-9:55BH 330

Discussion

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructorNotes
19639F9:05-9:55BH 141Emanuel MickelHonors section
18467F10:10-11:00BH 139David Wagner
18466M11:15-12:05WH 204David Wagner
18468F11:15-12:05AC C114David Wagner

In the critical approaches course "A Question of Love" we shall explore our understanding of the various emotions and relationships we cover by the word love. As a basis for understanding the different aspects of love in human relationships as represented in western tradition, we shall read and analyze an anthology of fundamental passages from several classical and medieval works, ranging from Plato and the Bible to Ovid and the Romance of the Rose. We shall use our discussion of these texts to analyze the representations of love in two medieval romances, Chretien's Erec and Enide and Gottfried's Tristan; one seventeenth and one eighteenth century French novel, The Princess of Cleves and Dangerous Liaisons; and an English novel of Jane Austen, Sense and Sensibility.

There will be three examinations during the semester including the final. Students will be asked to write two papers: one of two pages and one not more than three pages. In these papers students will learn to approach literary texts in a critical manner. Students taking this course for honors credit will write a fifteen-page paper in consultation with the instructor instead of the second three-page paper. Honors students will be expected to "discover" their own topic and create the outline. Meetings with the professor will help both in the "discovery" of the topic and in the drafting of an outline. In this course we shall discuss the psychology of love, the close relationship between love and philosophy, the question of love and chivalry in the Middle Ages, the importance of rhetoric and authorial use of persona. Analyzing these issues will add to the student's ability to understand the novel we shall read, to appreciate the many faceted aspects of the experiences we cover by the single word love, and to see the ways in which writers have represented these human emotions.

HON H234: Literature of Time and Place
1914-2014: World War I Issues and Legacies for the Global World of Today
(3 cr.)
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDaysTimeRoom
31419TR1:00-2:15BH 319

The shots that killed the Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife Sophie in Sarajevo (Bosnia) on June 28, 1914 resonated well into the rest of the century. The assassination was supposed to be a political gesture in favor of Serbian nationalism against the Hapsburg domination of the Balkans, but it resulted into the first of the two world wars that marked and transformed the geographical and political scene of the 20th-century. WWI (1914-1918) was called the Great War as it saw the intervention of countries far removed from Europe (the United States, Australia, Canada, South Africa…), but also because it was supposed to be a war that—in the intentions of many of the participants—would redress old problems and put an end to any further conflict. This was, naturally, a grand illusion. The war caused the collapse of the Austrian empire (1918), which, together with the downfall of the Russian empire (1917) and the Ottoman rule (1923), triggered a series of geographical and political decisions that, in good measure, were responsible for the clashes that brought to the second world war, and its long-term consequences: the Cold War, the anti-colonial struggles, the fall of the Soviet Union, the 1990’s ethnic wars in the former Yugoslavia, that is, in those exact lands that ignited the escalation that prompted WWI. Many of today’s conflicts that inflame some of the former Soviet territories as well as the Middle and Near East are also, indirectly, a consequence of poorly thought or unwisely conceived geo-political agreements that go back to the end of WWI. But the Great War was also a remarkable turning point for the modern development of the arts: drama, figurative arts, cinema, literature, and music, they have all been marked by the experience of the Great War. WWI was also the first moment in modern history that brought to the attention of the public debate many issues that are still very much in the current debates. Scientific and ethical concerns related to weapon of mass destruction, the ethical treatment of prisoners, the effect of humankind on the environment, the psychological health of the veterans, gender and race equality, are all themes that originate from the cultural aftermath of WWI. In this class we will examine the historical aspects that surrounded WWI and its many factors, as well as the myriad of topics that were motivated by its magnitude in the arts, and how many of those topics are still very much in front of us, in today’s global world.



French Courses

FRIT F100: Elementary French I (4 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
17964MWR9:05-9:55
17968MWR10:10-11:00
17965MWR11:15-12:05
17966MWR12:20-1:10
17967MWR1:25-2:15
17969MW7:15-8:45 pm

Introduction to French language and selected aspects of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of F100, F115, or F491.

FRIT F115: Accelerated Elementary French (4 cr.)
Amber Panwitz

NumberDaysTimeRoom
24725MTWR11:15-12:05AC C101

Prerequisite: Obtain authorization from department.

An accelerated treatment of material covered in both F100 and F150 designed for superior students and students with previous training in another foreign language. Credit given for only one of F115 and F100; Credit given for only one of F115 and F150. If interested, please fill out the online authorization form.

FRIT F150: Elementary French II: Language and Culture (4 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
18156 (cancelled)MTWR8:00-8:50
18157 (cancelled)MTWR9:05-9:55
18158MTWR10:10-11:00SY 006Jessica Tindira
18159MTWR10:10-11:00WH 104Renata Uzzell
18160MTWR11:15-12:05FQ 012BMargarita Madanova
18161MTWR12:20-1:10SY 006Jill Owen
18162MTWR1:25-2:15SY 006Erin Myers
18163MTWR2:30-3:20BH 315Jill Owen
18164MTWR2:30-3:20SY 006Jessica Tindira
18165MW7:15-8:45 pmBH 140Margarita Madanova
18166 (cancelled)TR7:15-8:45 pm

Prerequisite: F100.

Basic structures of the French language and selected topics of French civilization and culture. Credit given for only one of the following: F115, F150, or F491.

FRIT F200: Second-Year French I: Language and Culture (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
18173MWF8:00-8:50BH 332Noelle Lindstrom
18167MWF9:05-9:55BH 307Laura Demsey
18168MWF10:10-11:00BH 236Laura Demsey
18169MWF12:20-1:10BH 332Anemarie Calin
18170MWF1:25-2:15BH 322Emily O'Brock
18171MWF2:30-3:20BH 240George Khabarovskiy
18172MW7:15-8:30 pmWH 119George Khabarovskiy

Prerequisite: F150 or equivalent.

Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following third-semester courses: F200, F205, or F219.

FRIT F250: Second-Year French II: Language and Culture (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
18174MWF8:00-8:50BH 331Nicole Burkholder
18175MWF9:05-9:55BH 322Alisha Reaves
18176MWF10:10-11:00BH 233Martin Maillot
18179MWF11:15-12:05BH 322Cynthia Kanko
18177MWF1:25-2:15BH 214Cynthia Kanko
18181MWF1:25-2:15BH 015David Wagner
18178MWF2:30-3:20BH 214David Wagner
18180MWF3:35-4:25BH 315Sarah Kay Hurst
18182MW7:15-8:30 pmBH 337B. Devan Steiner
34801MW7:15-8:30 pmBH 245Krista Williams

Prerequisite: F200 or equivalent.

Grammar, composition, conversation coordinated with the study of cultural texts. Credit given for only one of the following fourth-semester courses: F250, F255, F265, or F269.

FRIT F300: Reading & Expression in French (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
18183TR9:30-10:45BH 240Aiko Okamoto-MacPhail
18184TR1:00-2:15WH 006Alison Calhoun
18185MWF2:30-3:20BH 236Erin Myers

Prerequisite: F250, F255, F265, or consent of department.

Aiko Okamoto-MacPhail

This course offers a general introduction to French literature through the reading of poetry, theater, and fiction. We will start the semester with poetry from the Course Packet. Each student will choose one poem and do an exposé in class and write an explication de texte. Then we advance to the 17th-century play by Jean Racine, Phèdre, and study the theater and the classic alexandrine verse which Racine perfected. We will read a picturesque short novel, Le château de Pictordu by a woman writer George Sand and two little known short stories by Gustave Flaubert, Un Parfum à sentir ou Les Baladins, and Passion et vertu. We end the semester with the twentieth-century author and Noble Prize winner André Gide’s Symphonie pastorale.

Alison Calhoun

The Figure of the Rebel in French Literature

A poet of evil, a polygamous knight errant, cruel aristocrats playing ruthless games with their lovers, and a murderer indifferent about his crime. These are among some of the rebellious authors or defiant characters we will explore in this thematic introduction to French literature. This course is meant to prepare you for coursework beyond the 300- level in French by expanding your knowledge of how to analyze texts and by continuing to reinforce the language skills you have begun to perfect. Our readings from diverse genres (novel, theater, poetry, short story, letters) will come from Montaigne’s Des Cannibales, Molière’s Dom Juan ou Le Festin de Pierre, Pierre Choderlos de Laclos’s Liaisons dangereuses, poems by Charles Baudelaire, poems by Arthur Rimbaud, and Albert Camus’ L’Etranger. Two films will also be part of our corpus: A Comédie Française recording of Molière’s Dom Juan, and Frears’ Liaisons dangereuses.

Erin Myers

Les femmes et la création du savoir sous l’ancien régime

Fontenelle, Newton, Descartes, Pascal, Voltaire, d’Alembert, Diderot : On reconnaît les grands noms de la physique, des mathématiques, de l’astronomie et de la philosophie. Par contre, les noms de Julie de l’Espinasse, Emilie du Châtelet, Anne de Gonzague de Clèves, et Louise Henriette (Sophie) Volland ne sont pas aussi connus. Ce cours propose d’aller à la rencontre des femmes réelles et fictives qui ont participé à la création du savoir scientifique et philosophique avant la Révolution. Quels étaient les apports particuliers des femmes et de la féminité ? Nous allons lire dans les mêmes genres de production écrite dans lesquels elles ont lu et écrit : des traités, essais, discours et rapports, des lettres philosophiques, des correspondances personnelles, et des portraits. En passant par le théâtre de Molière (Les Précieuses ridicules) nous aurons l’occasion de discuter des œuvres de Madeleine de Scudéry, la première romancière de l’ère moderne (titre controversé) qui a sans doute inspiré le personnage de Magdelon. Dans la même veine, nous découvrons des représentations filmiques de femmes philosophes sous l’Ancien Régime. Nous disposerons aussi des collections à la Lilly Library pour examiner des éditions originales du XVIIIe siècle.

La note finale sera répartie entre la lecture, d’une part – (interros de lecture et de vocabulaire, examen de mi-semestre) – et l’expression orale et écrite de l’autre (participation à la discussion en classe et sur les forums, une présentation orale et une composition écrite). Le cours sera mené en français.

FRIT F305: Théâtre et Essai: “Le poids de l’existence” (3 cr.)
Hall Bjørnstad

NumberDaysTimeRoom
24056TR9:30-10:45BH 214

What is the meaning of life? Does our existence have an obvious, pre-given purpose? If it has, how can it be that people don’t agree on this purpose? Is the purpose rather to search such for a meaning – or are these just the wrong questions altogether? Is the weight of these questions something we should embrace or escape? In this course we will study masterpieces from French literature that confront the question of the weight of existence in different ways. Alternating between early modern and 20th-century texts, we will explore essays by Montaigne, Pascal and Camus, and plays by Molière, Racine, Sartre and Beckett. The course will be writing-intensive and conducted seminar-style with focus on in-class discussion. Through our ongoing reflection and dialogue, the participants will improve (a) their skills as interpreters of French literature in general; (b) their grasp of the genres of the essay and theater in particular; (c) their mastery of academic French, both written and spoken. Course requirements include weekly response papers, three 2-page papers and final portfolio with rewrites of these. All class discussion, reading, and writing will be done in French.

FRIT F306: Roman et Poésie (3 cr.)
Margaret Gray

NumberDaysTimeRoom
18186TR1:00-2:15SY 212

« Histoires d’amour, en prose et en vers »

Dans ce cours qui traite de l’amour--de ses idéaux et ses trahisons, de ses réussites et ses échecs--nous lirons trois romans du vingtième siècle, ainsi qu’une variété de poèmes. Nous commencerons par un « polar », ou roman policier : Piège pour Cendrillon (1965) de Sébastien Japrisot, récit d’une tentative mystérieuse de meurtre. A l’intérieur des conventions mêmes du genre policier, pourtant, une histoire d’amour se profile presque trop discrètement. Passant ensuite à un roman québécois--Les chambres de bois (1958) d’Anne Hébert--, nous constaterons le conflit déclenché par des différences de classe sociale dans une culture traditionnelle et rigide : différences qu’un jeune aristocrate et une femme du peuple tentent de surmonter à travers leur amour. Nous terminerons le semestre avec une autofiction de Marguerite Duras--L’Amant (1984)--, inspiré d’une liaison que l’auteur a vécue pendant son adolescence en Indochine française : relation qui met en jeu des différences de race, de classe sociale, et de nationalité, dans un contexte colonial et exotique. Notre étude de L’Amant sera amplifiée et interrogée par une comparaison avec certaines scènes du film du même titre. Intercalés parmi nos romans différents seront des poèmes de la Renaissance (Louise Labé), du 19ème siècle (Baudelaire) et du 20ème siècle (Jules Supervielle, Catherine Pozzi, Guillaume Apollinaire, Louis Aragon, Paul Eluard, Anne Hébert). La note finale sera pondérée comme suit : participation active à la discussion en classe (10%), participation régulière aux forums électroniques (10%) ; exposé oral (10%) ; examen partiel (« midterm ») (20%) ; dissertation (25%) ; examen final (25 %).

FRIT F313: Advanced Grammar (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
18187MWF9:05-9:55BH 214Kelly Farmer
18188MWF11:15-12:05BH 219Barbara Vance
24147MWF12:20-1:10BH 236Eric MacPhail

Prerequisite: F250

Kelly Farmer

This course is designed to (a) build upon the intermediate student’s existing knowledge of major French grammar points through intensive study and (b) develop a more sophisticated mastery of advanced structures in preparation for F300 and beyond (including possible study abroad). By the end of this course, students should be able not only to speak and write more precisely on a range of topics but also to read and produce literary and academic writing with greater ease. We will supplement the text, Grammaire française (Ollivier & Beaudoin), with supplemental readings and materials from French and Francophone culture (e.g., newspaper and magazine articles, literary works, film). Grades will be based on daily preparation and homework, class participation, short writing assignments, quizzes, tests, and a cumulative final exam.

Barbara Vance

F313 builds students' understanding of advanced aspects of French grammar and their facility in applying this understanding to written and oral expression. We will supplement the text Grammaire Française (Ollivier) with exercises (online and others) based on various materials from French and francophone everyday society, including e.g. cross-cultural studies, journalism, and film.

Eric MacPhail

This course has two aims: to summarize the grammar learned up to this level and to expand that knowledge of written and literary French grammar. In order to do so, we use Harper's Grammar of French by Samuel N. Rosenberg et al. and the exercise book. The semester goal is to give students a grammatical instrument in preparation for the reading-intensive courses at the F300 and 400 levels. The class will be graded through various types of small and big tests.

FRIT F316: Conversational Practice (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
18193MWF10:10-11:00BH 321Audrey Dobrenn
18191MWF11:15-12:05BH 018Jamie Root
26422MWF12:20-1:10KH 200Mark Black
18192MWF1:25-2:15KH 200Loïc Lerme
18190TR7:15-8:30 pmWH 116Rodica Frimu

Prerequisite: F250 or F255.

Recent and classic award winning feature length French films (comedies, dramas, thrillers) provide the basis for vocabulary expansion, in-class discussion and debates, and an increased understanding of various French cultural and historical issues, including immigration, WWII, regional differences, and religious conflict. Class time will maximize speaking opportunities. Grading is based on in-class participation, presentations, and oral and written exams. NOTE: Students are required to watch the films outside of class (on-line streaming).

FRIT F317: French in the Business World (3 cr.)
Guillaume Ansart

NumberDaysTimeRoom
18194TR2:30-3:45SY 002

Introduction to the language of business activities in France and to the structure and functioning of various aspects of contemporary French economic life. Awareness of the general cultural context within which business activities take place in France will also be an important dimension of the course. Weekly exercises will include oral activities as well as reading and writing (translation, reading of articles from French newspapers and magazines on current economic issues, etc). Course taught in French. No previous knowledge of the world of French business is required.

FRIT F363: La France 1800-Aujourd'hui (3 cr.)
Oana Panaïté

NumberDaysTimeRoom
30367TR11:15-12:30BH 307

Prerequisite: F300.

The course is a broad introduction to major moments in French politics, society and culture from the aftermath of the 1789 Revolution to the postcolonial era. Key moments include the First and Second Empire, Romanticism, the Paris Commune, the Dreyfus Affair, Impressionism, First and Second World Wars, feminism, May 1968, decolonization, immigration, and France's role in the European Union.

FRIT F375: Thèmes et Perspectives Littéraires (3 cr., 1st 8 weeks)
Paolo Tortonese

NumberDaysTimeRoomNotes
23683TR1:00-3:15PY 1131st 8 weeks only

L’amour et l’argent dans la littérature française, de Prévost à Zola

La rencontre inopportune de l’amour et de l’argent est mise en scène par des romans centrés sur le personnage de la prostituée. Qu’il s’agisse de la grande courtisane ou de la « fille » racolant dans la rue, de la lorette ou de la demi-mondaine, ou encore de la prostituée enfermée dans la maison close, la femme qui vend son corps est un personnage éminent de la littérature française. Nous suivrons son évolution à travers des extraits de plusieurs œuvres : d’abord du roman Manon Lescaut, de l’abbé Prévost, qui met en place toutes les ambiguïtés du personnage, insaisissable mélange d’amour et d’inconstance. Puis nous rencontrerons la courtisane romantique de Victor Hugo, Marion Delorme, protagoniste d’un drame fondateur, où l’immense générosité de la femme perdue semble racheter ses péchés, et, à sa suite, La dame aux camélias, qui va jusqu’au sacrifice pour sauver son amant. Aux antipodes de ces héroïnes, nous verrons La Fille Élisa, des frères Goncourt, et Nana, de Zola : prostituées du bordel ou de la rue, condamnées à la déchéance rapide ou à la conquête des hautes classes, symboles de la pourriture qui gagne le corps social du prolétariat jusqu’aux élites. Et nous conclurons avec Maupassant, peintre du bordel (La Maison Tellier) et portraitiste d’une dernière figure héroïque de prostituée (Boule de suif).

Parallèlement à la lecture de ces œuvres littéraires, nous prendrons connaissance de quelques ouvrages sociologiques et médicaux du XIXe siècle sur la prostitution, ainsi que de quelques ouvrages critiques d’aujourd’hui.

FRIT F399: Reading for Honors (1-12 cr.)
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
18195Arranged

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in French. See the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Barbara Vance.

FRIT F401: Structure and Development of French (3 cr.)
Kevin Rottet

NumberDaysTimeRoom
18196TR9:30-10:45BH 015

This course provides an overview of the structure of present day French, a perspective on its historical development, and an analysis of some of the current language-related issues in the French-speaking world. We will first consider the history of Modern French from an external perspective, by examining some important historical events in the history of the language, and from an internal perspective, by looking at some of the specific ways the language has changed over time. Then we will talk about variation in French, or how French differs geographically (i.e. dialects and regional varieties in France and in the French-speaking world), how it differs socially (i.e. how social categories such as socioeconomic class or sex are reflected in language use), and how it differs situationally (i.e. how people change the ways they speak depending on who they're talking to, the formality of the situation, etc.). Along the way we will look at spoken versus written French, slang, and français populaire. Next we will discuss directions for the future: how French creates new words (neologisms), copes with English influence (Anglicisms), and addresses issues concerning the feminization of the names of occupations traditionally practiced by males.

FRIT F451: French Studies-Literature and Arts (3 cr.)
Eric MacPhail

NumberDaysTimeRoom
30371MWF1:25-2:15BH 137

Raymond Queneau en prose et en vers

This course samples the poems, essays, and novels of the 20th-century French author Raymond Queneau, best known for the movie adaptation of his novel Zazie dans le métro. Throughout his career, Queneau was fascinated by the possibility of emulating speech in writing and he called his experimental language le néo-français. In addition to reading interviews and essays on this topic, as well as verse experiments in neo-French, we will read three novels that reflect different aspects of his genius. Loin de Rueil reflects Queneau’s fascination with the cinema and the role of the imagination in fiction and reality. It also includes a notable interview conducted in “Hollywood” French. Les fleurs bleues features two characters who exist in each other’s dreams, one in the present and one in the past who voyages through time to rejoin his double in the present. Le vol d’Icare, Queneau’s last novel, tells the story of a fictional character who escapes from a novel and sets off a paradoxical manhunt that highlights the autonomy of fiction. Students will prepare an in-class presentation, write and rewrite an expository essay, and take a final exam. The class will be given in French.

FRIT F455: Le Roman au 20e Siecle (3 cr.)
Margaret Gray

NumberDaysTimeRoom
30375TR 4:00-5:15 SY 200

« Politique des Femmes Ecrivains »

Ce cours se propose d’étudier les interrogations menées par diverses romancières—à l’intérieur comme à l’extérieur de l’Hexagone—de leurs propres cultures. Avec La Vagabonde de Colette (1910), nous étudierons la recherche—audacieuse et courageuse à cette époque--d’une indépendance littéraire, sentimentale, et financière chez une jeune actrice de music-hall. Ayant fui un mariage malheureux, la narratrice doit s’affronter à une culture encore peu habituée aux femmes seules et professionnelles. Dans Les belles images (1966) de Simone de Beauvoir, nous scruterons une critique de la société technocrate et consommatrice d’après-guerre, et surtout son impact sur une nouvelle classe de femmes professionnelles. Nous nous trouverons ensuite en Belgique avec Jacqueline Harpman, dont le roman Orlanda (1996) reprend le topos de la dystopie de façon assez subtile—à travers l’histoire d’une héroïne professionnelle qui jouit d’une carrière réussie, tout en étant consciente d’un certain manque, un certain vide : roman qui résume et réunit ces questions d’identité, d’altérité et de transformation à travers une relation qui se noue entre deux parties d’une même personne, la timide Aline et son outrageux double masculin, Orlanda. Nous terminerons le semestre avec Comment Cuisiner son Mari à l’Africaine (2000) de Calixthe Beyala, récit situé dans le Paris contemporain et hybride de l’immigration, et qui évoque la lutte entre un passé traditionaliste et un présent rempli de fausses solutions. A travers ces lectures différentes, nous serons attentifs aux capacités de la fiction de représenter et de critiquer les cultures de nos écrivain(e)s; aux façons dont le pouvoir (politique, social, sexuel, culturel, racial) et ses diverses formes sont étudiés dans ces textes; aux stratégies de résistance, voire d’opposition, personnelle et collective qui y sont explorées; et aux aspects formels de ces textes littéraires. Seront demandés : une participation active à la discussion en classe (10%) ; des réponses écrites aux lectures (10%) ; un exposé oral (10%) ; un examen partiel (« midterm ») (20%) ; une dissertation (25%) ; un examen final (25 %).

FRIT F492: Reading French for Graduate Students (4 cr.)
Carly Bahler

NumberDaysTimeRoom
18197TR7:15-8:45 pmBH 135

Prerequisite: F491 or consent of department. Open with consent of the instructor to undergraduates who have already completed the B.A. language requirement in another language.

Continuation of language and reading development from F491. Credit given for only one of F492 or any of the following: F150, F169, F200, F205, or F219.

FRIT F495: Individual Readings in French
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
18199Arranged

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of this semester's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.

FRIT F499: Reading for Honors
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
18200Arranged

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in French. See the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Eric MacPhail.

Italian Courses

FRIT M100: Elementary Italian I (4 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
18205MTWR9:05-9:55WH 104Andrea Polegato
18207MTWR11:15-12:05WH 104Sara Dallavalle
18209MTWR12:20-1:10WH 104Alicia Vitti
18208MTWR1:25-2:15WH 104Sara Dallavalle
18206MW7:15-8:45 pmBH 233Anna Love

Introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that develop grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Cultural topics and simple cultural comparisons are introduced. Credit given for only one of the following: M100, M110, M115, or M491.

FRIT M115: Accelerated Elementary Italian (4 cr.)
Karolina Serafin

NumberDaysTimeRoom
18210MTWR11:15-12:05WY 111

Prerequisite: Obtain authorization from department.

An accelerated treatment of material covered in both M100 and M150 designed for superior students and students with previous training in another foreign language. Credit given for only one of M115 and M100; Credit given for only one of M115 and M150. If interested, please fill out the online authorization form.

FRIT M150: Elementary Italian II (4 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
18211 (cancelled)MTWR8:00-8:50
18213MTWR10:10-11:00FQ 012BJulide Etem
18214MTWR11:15-12:05BH 135Lucia Gemmani
22231MTWR11:15-12:05SY 006Austin Alexander
18215MTWR12:20-1:10BH 135Austin Alexander
20709MTWR1:25-2:15BH 135Lucia Gemmani
18216MTWR2:30-3:20BH 135Cara Takakjian
18217MW7:15-8:45 pmBH 214Laura Ponziani

Prerequisite: M100.

Continued introduction to contemporary Italian language, geography, and culture. Involves a broad variety of assignments and activities that build grammatical competency and proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Practice with new cultural topics and basic cultural analysis. Credit given for only one of the following: M110, M115, M150, or M491.

FRIT M200: Intermediate Italian I (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
18218 (cancelled)MWF9:05-9:55
18219MWF11:15-12:05BH 307Alicia Vitti
24726MWF1:25-2:15BH 240Paola Marrero Hernandez

Prerequisite: M110, M115, M150, or equivalent.

Building on Elementary Italian I and II, students further study and practice fundamental concepts and structures in Italian grammar. Through a variety of assignments and activities, they strengthen proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, writing, cultural analysis and understanding. Includes an introduction to brief literary texts. Credit given for only one of M200 or M215.

FRIT M215: Accelerated Second-Year Italian (4 cr.)
Cara Takakjian

NumberDaysTimeRoom
23424MTWR1:25-2:15BH 231

Prerequisite: M115 or equivalent (M100 and M150), and consent of instructor.

An accelerated treatment of material covered in both M200 and M250. Designed for students who have completed M115 and other highly motivated students, students with extensive experience with another language, and/or students who aspire to study abroad. Credit given for only one of the following: M215 or M200-M250.

FRIT M222: Topics in Italian Culture (3 cr.)
Marco Arnaudo

NumberDaysTimeRoom
26213TR11:15-12:30BH 214

Italians at War

This course explores representations of war in Italian literature, film, and culture, with examples drawn from antiquity to the 20th century. Each representation will be placed in its proper historical context and compared with the actual historical events it portrays. In English.

FRIT M222: Topics in Italian Culture (2nd 8 weeks; 3 cr.)
Cara Takakjian

NumberDaysTimeRoom
35139TR4:00-6:30pmSY 210

Sex, Fumetti and Rock n' Roll: Italian Pop Culture of the 1960s

Across Europe and the United States, the period of 1968 was a time of social and political revolution. In Italy, the era’s turbulence can be felt most resoundingly in pop cultural works, from fumetti (comics) to film to music. In this course, we will analyze Italian graphic novels, feature films, and popular music from the years 1967-1969 in order to understand how cultural production both reflected this moment in Italian history and functioned as a significant instrument of change.

FRIT M236: Dante's Divine Comedy (3 cr.)
H. Wayne Storey

NumberDaysTimeRoom
31193TR2:30-3:45BH 317

A thorough reading of Dante’s influential masterpiece of retributive justice in its historical and cultural contexts, including Dino Compagni’s unfinished and subsequently suppressed chronicle of Florence up to the death of Henry VII, as well as the artistic movements, economics, ethics, and politics of his day, which still influence Italian society.

FRIT M250: Intermediate Italian II (3 cr.)
Staff

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
22779MWF9:05-9:55JH A107Alicia Vitti
18220MWF10:10-11:00BH 140Alicia Vitti
18221MWF1:25-2:15BH 236Adriana Varela
18222MWF2:30-3:20BH 015Adriana Varela

Prerequisite: M200 or equivalent.

The study of more complex concepts and structures in Italian grammar. Through a variety of texts, media, and assignments, students practice listening, speaking, reading, and writing, and they analyze cultural topics and situations in greater depth. Increased attention to short literary texts. Credit given for only one of M250 or M215.

FRIT M301: Italian Reading & Expression (3 cr.)
Karolina Serafin

NumberDaysTimeRoomInstructor
20585MTWRF10:10-11:00LH 019Sandro Puiatti
26628MTWRF11:15-12:05LH 019Carlotta Paltrinieri

Prerequisite: M250 or consent of instructor.

In this course students will learn to analyze texts from the main literary genres (lyric poetry, epic poetry, narrative, theater, songs, cinema) using specialized vocabulary, basic literary tropes and rhetorical figures, and basic principles of poetic rhyme and meter. Students will also improve their skills and deepen their understanding of intermediate and advanced grammar structures through daily practice in speaking and writing activities about the texts at hand and other cultural topics. Learning objectives for this course include a demonstrated ability to read and write analytically with greater accuracy and ease, and to speak and listen with greater fluency and confidence about literary and other cultural (musical, visual, journalistic) texts. Conducted in Italian.

FRIT M308: Masterpieces of Italian Literature II (3 cr.)
Massimo Scalabrini

NumberDaysTimeRoom
29310TR4:00-5:15BH 314

The focus of this course is on the literature of the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. Its goal is to read some of modern Italy’s most representative works, to understand them in their diverse historical contexts, and to develop a critical approach to literary texts. Special attention will be paid to such topics as the Enlightenment, Romanticism, Verism, the symbolist movement and its legacy, the avant-guards, war and literature, Fascism and literature, and contemporary literature. Students will write three short essays during the term, participate in an oral presentation, take five quizzes and a final exam. The class will be conducted in Italian.

FRIT M311: Italian Film and Culture (3 cr.)
Antonio Vitti

NumberDaysTimeRoomNotes
27350TR1:00-2:15BH 233

Modern Italian Cinema: A Never-Ending Challenge

This course is a survey of Italian cinema from the nineties to the present. It analyzes works by a number of different directors; including well known directors such as Bertolucci, Bellocchio, Amelio, Salvatores, Moretti, Sorrentino, Garrone and Muccino whose films are representative of sociopolitical trends in the Italian culture of the time. Students will learn how to do critical reading of visual texts, and will be provided with cinematic terminology and a recent bibliography on the subject. Special attention is devoted to new Italian comedy, new authors and the phenomenon of neo-neorealism.

Students view ten films in Italian with subtitles. The format includes lectures, screenings, and in-class discussions

This course is taught in English. Joint-offered with CMCL-C398 abd WEUR-W406.

FRIT M455: Readings in the Italian Cinema (3 cr.)
The New Maestri of Italian Cinema

Antonio Vitti

NumberDaysTimeRoomNotes
29318TR11:15-12:30SY 210

This course will study the major developments of contemporary Italian cinema. Important full-length feature films by Gianni Amelio, Matteo Garrone, Nanni Moretti, Gabriele Salvatores, Giuseppe Tornatore, Paolo Sorrentino, Paolo Virzì, Michelangelo Frammartino, Roberta Torre, Cristina Comencini, Francesca Archibugi, Carlo Verdone and Silvio Soldini will be studied and discussed from different perspectives. Students will learn how to read a film and write short reviews.

Taught in Italian.

FRIT M492: Readings in Italian for Graduate Students (CANCELLED) (4 cr.)
Alicia Vitti

NumberDaysTimeRoom
18223TR

Prerequisite: M491 or consent of department.

Open with consent of the instructor to undergraduates who have already completed the B.A. language requirement in another language. Continuation of language and reading development from M491. Credit not given for both M492 and either of the following: M150 or M200.

FRIT M495: Individual Reading in Italian Literature (1-3 cr.)
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
18225Arranged
26917Arranged

Independent study on a specific topic not taught in one of this semester's regular courses. If interested, complete the permission form.

FRIT M499: Reading for Honors
Andrea Ciccarelli

NumberDay/Time
18226Arranged

For students preparing an honors project to receive a degree with departmental honors in Italian. See the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Massimo Scalabrini.

Honors and Cross-Listed Courses

COLL C103: Cloak & Dagger (3 cr.)
Marco Arnaudo

Lecture

NumberDaysTimeRoom
26503TR10:10-11:00BH 310

Discussion (choose one)

NumberDayTimeRoomInstructor
26527F10:10-11:00BH 319Marianna Orsi
30513F10:10-11:00BH 215David Winkler
26526F1:25-2:15BH 315Marianna Orsi
30515F1:25-2:15WH 204David Winkler
26525F2:30-3:20WH 204David Winkler
30514F2:30-3:20BH 315Marianna Orsi

This course introduces students to one of the most basic concepts of literary criticism - literary genres - with specific reference to a popular genre such as the so-called "thriller." "Thriller" is a term that came into use in the late nineteenth century and was applied not only to the detective story, the most famous examples of which were A. Conan Doyle's tales about Sherlock Holmes, but also to a closely related literary genre, the spy novel, that also attained great popularity during the period.

The primary focus of this course will be to teach students how to understand the conventions and traditions that govern any literary genre, with specific reference to the "thriller" as exemplified by selected detective and spy stories in both literature and film. Attention will be paid to critical concepts such as style, form, structure, point of view, and implied reader, in order to provide students with analytical tools that will be valuable in the years to come. It is my hope that students will apply the lessons they learn about genre in this class to any literary genre, not only genres typical of popular culture.

Readings will include the detective fiction of Poe, Conan Doyle, Agatha Christie, Raymond Chandler, and Friedrich Dürrenmatt. We will also examine several detective-mystery movies, including the recent Sherlock Holmes (2009), and the classic masterpieces of the noir tradition, including The Maltese Falcon and The Big Sleep. For the spy genre, we will read the pre-Cold War novel A Coffin for Dimitrios, a James Bond novel by Ian Fleming, and a Cold War spy novel by John Le Carré. In addition, we will screen two very different James Bond films: one made during the height of the Cold War, and Martin Campbell's Casino Royale (2006).