Indiana University
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Program Description

Whether you are completely new to the subject or just in need of a refresher, this program will help you understand the material presented in your high school courses. In addition, class sizes are capped at 15 students in order to create a better learning environment.

We offer courses in Physics, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Astronomy, Computer Science and, new in 2015, Geology! Feel free to sign up for as many courses as you wish! During each session, classes will take place in the morning, afternoon or evening. Check the schedule to see when your class takes place.

The courses will meet three times a week (Monday, Wednesday, and Friday) for approximately 2 hours a day. Courses are taught by Indiana Unversity graduate students. The courses will meet in the Physics Department in Swain West Hall (727 E. Third St.), Geological Sciences (Geology) and Jordan Hall (Biology)---all on the IU campus. IU parking permits are available for purchase upon request.

Receive a participation certificate for successfully participating in an FSM course! A course instructor will have the authority to certify students. Typically, a student would be required to attend at least 5 out of 6 classes in order to obtain the certificate. The text and design of the sample certificate is subject to revision.

The cost of this program is $35 per course. Considering the fact that 12 hours of tutoring would normally cost around $300, this program represents a very cost effective means of receiving extra instruction in science and mathematics.



Course Descriptions

Intro Physics The introductory physics course is intended for students who have never previously taken a physics course. We will discuss common topics in first year physics including one-dimensional motion, forces, and two-dimensional motion. Students should have some experience with algebra and geometry. In addition to introductory physics material, we will stress logical problem solving methods. By the end of the course, students should have a foundational understanding of how to approach problems in physics.

AP Physics This course is designed for students who will be taking advanced or AP high school physics in the fall. Students will be expected to have taken introductory physics or be somewhat familiar with basic kinematics, Newton's laws, and energy and momentum. In addition, students should be familiar with trigonometry. We will review kinematics in 1D and 2D, Newton's laws, and energy and momentum, and go more into depth on these topics. In addition, we will discuss vectors and possibly introduce calculus in a physics setting. By the end of the course, students should have the problem solving tools to approach advanced problems in high school physics.

Introduction to Universe Introduction to Universe is an introductory course in astronomy with no prerequisites (except introductory algebra). The course will cover fundamental topics in modern astronomy: our Sun, life in the solar system, telescopes, spacecrafts, galaxies, black holes, AGNs, quasars, big bang, expansion of Universe, and recent advancements. The origins of stars, planets, and exoplanets (newly discovered planetary systems outside our solar system) will be discussed as well. After taking this course, a student will have gained a good understanding of our place in Universe.

Pre-Calculus This course is designed for students who will be taking a high school pre-calculus course in the fall. We will examine several different types of functions, their properties, their behaviors, and their uses. In this context we will also introduce trigonometric functions and other basic topics in trigonometry.

AP Calculus This course is designed for students who will be taking a high school calculus course in the fall. Students will be expected to have some understanding of pre-calculus ideas and methods, such as trigonometry. We will minimally cover some of these prerequisites, but will spend much of our time studying limits, continuity and derivatives (the material covered in the first semester of high school Calculus courses). By the end of the course, students should understand the fundamental ideas behind differentiation and why it is useful.

Mathematical Topics The aim of this course is to improve students' critical thinking skills and help them acquire self-confidence in independent thinking. The format of the course will be solving a variety of problems/puzzles/riddles. The problems will come in different flavors. Some will require nothing but a clever argument, some a little bit of math. We may briefly touch on some basic concepts in combinatorics, elementary number theory, logic or calculus depending on the context of the problems. However, no prior knowledge of these is required to take the course. The only requirement is the willingness to commit to intensive thinking for two weeks. Before each class, a set of problems will be assigned. You will be asked to come to the class with ideas. The course/lab time will consist of explanation of the solutions, generalizations and the bigger mathematical picture behind the problems. One other aim of the class time is to interact and share your ideas with others.

The Earth This course is designed for students who want to gain a better understanding of the planet they call home. No prior Earth Science knowledge is needed, however basic algebra skills would be beneficial. We will explore Earth's 1) atmosphere: weather basics, extreme weather, climate change, 2) geosphere: rocks/minerals, plate tectonics, and 3) hydrosphere: rivers, lakes, oceans. Class time will be a combination of discussion and hands-on lab activities.

Biology This is an introductory course designed for students taking their first high school biology class in the fall. The goal of the course is to give students a conceptual framework for topics that will be covered in their biology course, and primary emphasis will be on developing an understanding of concepts rather than on the memorization of specific terms. We will divide our time between 1) Molecules and Cells, 2) Heredity and Evolution, and 3) Organisms and Populations. Class time will be a combination of discussion and lab exercises. The labs will be a mixture of outside activities, computer simulations, and hands-on exercises.

Accelerated Biology This is a course designed for students taking honors, advanced, or AP biology in the fall. We will use the AP biology curriculum as a guideline, and primary emphasis will be on developing an understanding of concepts rather than on the memorization of specific terms. We will divide our time between 1) Molecules and Cells, 2) Heredity and Evolution, and 3) Organisms and Populations. Class time will be a combination of discussion and lab exercises. The labs will be a mixture of outside activities, computer simulations, and hands-on exercises. This course will move at a faster pace and cover more material to a deeper degree than the standard "Biology" course.

Introduction to Chemistry Students will review relevant math and science concepts that they will need in their upcoming chemistry class. Students will be introduced to a variety of new chemistry concepts, focusing on subject areas that students will encounter during their first semester of chemistry, such as dimensional analysis and chemical structure. No background chemistry knowledge is needed to participate in this course. Students will have the opportunity to work in a lab learning how to use new techniques and equipment during the hands-on experiment portion of each class session. We hope to teach students a general approach to chemistry problem-solving that will help them throughout their entire chemistry education.

Chemistry in Food Cooking is applied chemistry and chemistry is a lot like cooking. In this experiment based course, students will explore several topics to discover components, detect additives, and evaluate quality of foods they may eat daily. Each day, students will perform an experiment, from which they will learn experimental skills, chemistry behind each processes, and strengthen chemistry problem-solving skills. Although a basic knowledge of introductory chemistry will be preferred, we still encourage students to enroll in this course if they are interested in this topic.
Introduction to Programming Students will learn how to program using the Python programming language and how to plot data from real-world sources. No background in programming or computing is necessary, and participants will be taught how to set up the computing environment at home. Class time will be held in a computer lab and students will gain hands-on experience interacting with programs and files. Computational thinking is crucial for the future of STEM fields.