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Graduate Courses

Complete Offerings

Graduate Core Courses
(required for the Gender Studies Ph.D. and open to others as well):

G600 Concepts of Gender Introduces historical, theoretical, behavioral, philosophical, scientific, multi- and cross-cultural perspectives on gender and its meanings, exploring its disciplinary and interdisciplinary uses and implications. Attention is given to the emergence of the category “gender” itself, and its variable applications to different fields of knowledge, experience, cultural expression, and institutional regulation, including queer, trans, and other theories of sex, sexuality, and desire. The course looks at gender as a way to understand multiple and interlocking systems of power, more specifically, as hierarchies that yield complex questions of race, class, ethnicity, nation/empire, among other markers of difference.

G603 Contemporary Debates in Feminist Theory Explores classic and current feminist theories, asking questions about knowledge, subjectivity, sexuality, and ethics. Debates are situated within and against various intellectual movements, such as Marxism, post-structuralism, theories of race and ethnicity, postcolonial/transnational/diaspora and cultural studies, and others. Sexuality studies and queer theory’s relation to feminist praxis will form a key component of the course, as it juxtaposes classic social theory and feminist texts with more current works.

G702 Researching Gender Issues Research Research methodologies and approaches relevant to Gender Studies are explored, and students apply them to a particular scholarly project. The impact of Gender Studies on epistemological and methodological issues in a variety of academic disciplines is examined according to student/instructor backgrounds and interests.


 

Elective Courses

G598 Feminist Theory: Classic Texts and Founding Debates Explores founding texts of contemporary feminist theory, asking questions about identity, knowledge, sexuality, and ethics. Such works have emerged in relation to a variety of theoretical discourses, such as Marxism, structuralism, cultural studies, and others. Examines the intellectual history of feminist theory and its resonance with more recent trends in gender studies.

G601 Scientific Practices & Feminist Knowledge Examines intersections of gender and knowledge, focusing on feminist analyses of scientific epistemology and practice. Explores the implications of various feminist theories about the social meaning and gendered construction of scientific research. Particular focus is placed upon race, class, sexuality and cultural difference in scientific accounts of "human nature." Specific topics for students' research projects may include: the history and politics of sexual difference in scientific discourse; feminist perspectives on, and appropriations of, the concept of objectivity; the circulation of scientific findings and technologies in popular culture; and the formulation of alternative scientific methods and knowledge.

G602 Gender Dimensions of Cultural Production & Criticism This course evaluates a diverse array of arguments concerning the gendered nature of cultural production and criticism. Controversies related to the gendered dimensions of aesthetics, cultural meanings, content, or genres are examined, as are vested claims about the constitution of genius or creativity, and the role of identities in cultural production. The critical issue of theorizing audience/reader/viewer and the often gendered nature of cultural criticism warrant particular scrutiny, especially in a cross-cultural frame.

G604 Knowledge, Gender, and Truth Examines feminist contributions to epistemological questioning of knowledge formations through comparison of case study disciplines and through cross-cultural analysis. Debates about "truth," "objectivity," "validity," "reason" and "representativeness" as gendered categories receive scrutiny in relation to fields such as historiography, ethnography, science, psychology, or cultural studies.

G695 Graduate Readings and Research in Gender Studies [1-6 credits] This course provides for graduate students' intensive independent study of specific topics. Study is supervised by an appropriate core or affiliated faculty member whose research expertise matches the student's area of interest. These student projects are developed in consultation with this faculty member and the Director of Graduate Studies. Obtain permission form from the Gender Studies Office and have it signed by the faculty member agreeing to work with you.

G696 Research Colloquium in Gender Studies [1-3 credits] Active participation in Gender Studies research colloquia. Introduces students to the problems, interpretations, theories, and research trends in all areas related to gender and sexuality studies. Colloquia also cover themes in Gender Studies professional development (identification of funding sources, resume and job interview preparation, etc). Topics vary throughout the semester. May be repeated more than once for credit.

G700 Sexualized Genders/Gendered Sexualities This course engages students with complex debates around sex, gender, sexuality, and the body that push beyond binary models reliant on a simple "nature/culture"distinction. Drawing heavily on queer theory, sexuality studies, and trans theory, we scrutinize the collision, intersection, and interaction between theories of gender and theories of sexuality. Rather than attempt to "bring it all together,"we will instead provoke continued debate about the complicated relationship between gender, gendered identities, sexuality, sexual "identities,"racialized bodies and identities and forms of power and coercion.

G701 Graduate Topics in Gender Studies [variable titles, 3-4 credits]: Addresses particular problems or topics arising within interdisciplinary gender studies at an advanced research-oriented level. Topics for each offering of the seminar are chosen according to instructor expertise and are rotated regularly. Students design and complete original research projects in light of seminar themes and assessments of existing scholarship.

G704 Cultural Politics and Twentieth Century Sexuality This course interrogates the complex relationships among and developments in sex research, sex reform, sexual behavior and cultural politics in the United States and comparable countries during the twentieth century, through the exploration of the writings of key reformers, researchers, scholars, and popularizers of changed understandings of sexuality.

G707: Gender Pedagogy & Theory A high-level graduate course, designed to offer theory and practical applications for teaching feminist and gender studies.

G708 Contested Masculinities This course examines masculinity at sites of contestation -- between disciplines, historical moments, nationalities, regions and bodily ontologies. By tracing the resonances of transnational, transdisciplinary, and transhistorical masculinities, our aim is to critically examine masculinities, particularly in the context of feminist challenges to hegemonic and violative gender ideologies.

G710 Gender, Medicine and the Body Examines interdisciplinary topics related to medicine and the body as they interact with gender. Theoretical works are positioned against primary texts, the latter drawn from both fiction and non-fiction works, which may be drawn from both Western and non-Western cultural traditions. Variable offerings of the course address particular topics of interest and research controversy, such as hormone replacement therapies, gender associated cancers, contraception, sexual dysfunction therapies, eating disorders, psychiatric illness, geriatric conditions, and other related subjects.

G718 Transnational Feminisms and the Politics of Globalization This course interrogates recent interventions into the debates around globalization and gender, focusing on how gender plays out in the flows of money, people, and culture that characterize "globalization." In what ways is migration a gendered experience? How does gender become configured by geographic dislocations and re-routings? How are women and men differently situated as agents and subjects of global change?

G780: Gender Studies Professionalism This course is designed to offer advanced graduate students an intensive exposure to the theories, practices and processes of gender studies as a profession. In general, the course offers students a practical structure for such professional activities as writing abstracts for conferences and grants, turning a seminar paper into a publishable article, approaching editors of journals and presses, writing job letters, compiling CVs and teaching portfolios, giving conference papers and job talks, and applying for grants, post-docs and faculty positions. The course is organized thematically according to the instructor’s purview and will vary in its specific content and scope from semester to semester. Practicum credit is available for students who elect to participate in extra-curricular research, conference, or writing activities (as determined by the instructor teaching the course).


 

Topics of Past Graduate Seminars:

  • Women, Sexuality, and Health: Research Issues and Policy Implications
  • Gender and Sexuality in Modern North African and Middle Eastern Narrative
  • Gender Medicine and the Body- East and West
  • Feminism, Sexuality, and Cultural Politics
  • Women in Modern British History
  • Writing Women in Early Modern England
  • Gender, Religion, and the Body in 19th Century England
  • Feminist Studies and Ethnographic Practice
  • The Culture of Disability: Gender, Medicine, and Society
  • Gender and Diversity Issues in Art and Education
  • Foundations of Feminist Art: History, Philosophy, and Context
  • Ethnography of the U.S.
  • Law, Sex, and Scandal: The Lewinsky Affair
  • Gender, Race, and Sexuality in Early 20th Century American Social Science
  • Gender in the Victorian Age
  • Law and Culture
  • Gender, Race, and Sexuality in Early American Social Science
  • Feminism Between Women's Suffrage and the Pill
  • Gender and Comic Strips
  • Aesthetics and Gender
  • Masculinities in Early America
  • Contraception, Gender, & Culture

Combined Courses

GNDR G600 & CULS C701: Concepts of Gender (3 credits)

This course introduces historical, theoretical, behavioral, philosophical, scientific, multi- and cross-cultural perspectives on gender and its meanings, exploring its disciplinary and interdisciplinary uses and implications. Attention is given to the emergence of the category "gender" itself, and its variable applications to different fields of knowledge, experience, cultural expression, and institutional regulation. The class will be taught as seminar. Readings are to be done before class so that you may fully participate in the discussion. This course deals with aspects of human sexuality and gender in a straight-forward and explicit manner. If this is a problem for you, please do not take this course.

Lecture: 11:00am-1:45pm - T - Instructor: Sanders, S (section: 22253) MO 313


GNDR G601 & CULS C701 Scientific Practices & Feminist Knowledge (3 credits)

This course examines intersections of gender and knowledge, with a particular focus on feminist analyses of scientific epistemology and practice, exploring the implications of various, sometimes conflicting, feminist theories about the social meaning and the gendered construction of scientific research. Particular focus is placed upon race, class, sexuality and cultural difference in medical, psychological, and evolutionary accounts of "human nature." Specific topics for students' research projects may include: the history and politics of sexual difference in scientific discourse; feminist perspectives on, and appropriations of, the concept of objectivity; the circulation of scientific findings and technologies in popular culture; and the formulation of alternative scientific methods and knowledge.

Lecture: 1:00pm-3:30pm - R - Instructor: Gremillion, H (section: 26745) MME 131


GNDR G701 & ANTH E660: Graduate Topics in Gender Studies (3 credits)
Topic: Dance, Gender & Embodied Discourse

Dance does not exist except as it is realized in the human body. Through its performance and its ability to elicit a kinesthetic response in performer and viewer alike, dance becomes elemental and gendered. Classical performance traditions, popular forms, and communally-embedded dance all address gender and the potential for embodied meanings. Embodied forms of discourse speak through a variety of voices and channels creating meanings that may be ambiguous and contradictory. We will examine form and meaning as we explore the danced body and its dialogic potential across Eastern and Western traditions both classical and popular. Seminar participants may choose any genre or tradition of dance or dance-theatre for their research.

Lecture: 2:30pm-3:45pm - TR - Instructor: Royce, A P (section : 28199) BH 209


GNDR G701 & POLS Y657 & POLS Y665: Graduate Topics in Gender Studies (3 credits)
Topic: Comparative Gender Policies

The course will examine discursive politics and social movement practices to understand the conditions and processes that lead to gender public policies. While recognizing that public policies affect all people, this course will focus on policies that either directly or indirectly confront the way gender is constructed and maintained. Our primary focus will be on issues such as marriage and civil unions (both heterosexual and same-sex), reproduction (including abortion and reproductive technologies), family/ child policies (including perhaps adoption), soldiering and citizenship (including transgender considerations.) One of our emphases will be on comparing the discursive politics and political opportunity structures across nations for the same set of issues. Why does discourse develop differently, what are the conditions leading to different opportunity structures, and why are outcomes similar or different? The first two-thirds of the seminar will focus on a core set of readings, including both classics such as Skocpol's Protecting Soldier and Mothers and Mansbridge, Why We Lost the ERA, to new studies such as Outshoorn, The Politics of Prostitution: Women's Movements, Democratic States and the Globalisation of Sex Commerce (2004), Bernstein & Schaffner, Regulating Sex (2005) and Mazur, Theorizing Feminist Policy (2006). The last third of the semester will provide an opportunity for students to explore other policy areas not covered in the core readings. Readings will be drawn from political science, gender studies, sociology, and policy studies journals, books and edited volumes.

Lecture: 1:15pm-3:20pm - M - Instructor: Robinson, J (section: 23348) WH 204


GNDR G701 & LAW B789: Graduate Topics in Gender Studies (3 credits)
Topic: Feminist Jurisprudence

This class explores a variety of feminist approaches to law. We will begin with a review of the development of several schools of feminist legal theory, including liberal feminism, cultural or relational feminism, dominance feminism, and postmodernist feminism. We will examine the perspective offered by these approaches on central issues in the philosophy of law, including the meaning of equality, the possibility of objectivity or neutrality, and the role of power. We will then apply these feminist theories to a range of legal issues, such as rape, sexual harassment and other employment discrimination, child custody, spousal abuse, the regulation of reproduction, and work/family conflict.

Lecture: 1:15pm-2:10pm - MTW - Instructor: Williams, S (section: 26746) Law 213


GNDR G701 & ANTH E617: Graduate Topics in Gender Studies (3 credits)
Topic: African Women

African women carry heavy, growing responsibilities within their communities that bring them respect but rarely the resources they need. Following themes of autonomy and control of social, cultural and economic resources, we discuss alternatives and radical changes from pre-colonial to contemporary times and consider their relevance to African and US development policy, to African feminist concerns and to our own options. We will talk about how African women fit into important public discussions in Africa on economic development, urbanization, family breakdown, nationalism and religion. Some issues familiar in Western media, including famines, refugees, civil wars, Islamic and Christian fundamentalism, polygyny and AIDS, have special relevance for African women. They also can contribute distinctive experiences and ideas to our discussions of some problems Americans now feel sharply, such as preserving family and religious values, building mutual respect between men and women and between ethnic groups, teen or unwed mothers, budget cuts, unemployment and global economic competition. Basic concepts and analytic skills from this course will help you join in these debates effectively and learn critically from public media such as television and newspapers. By the end of the semester, you will know what major issues African women consider important to their lives, especially family and economic issues. You should be well aware of the broad range of diversity of viewpoints on these issues and familiar with some of the most common perspectives. You will also see the range of diversity in the situations of specific groups of African women, and be able to identify the most important local and international conditions that affect their position. We will concentrate on the factors that give women more or less access to key resources they need to provide security for themselves and their families. We will also consider how our actions and US government policies contribute to these influential factors.

Lecture: 2:30pm-3:45pm - TR - Instructor: Clark, G (section: 26742) SB 150


Upcoming Courses for Spring 2015 will be announced in Fall 2014.