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Undergraduate Courses

Complete Offerings

G101: Gender, Culture, and Society (3 cr.) A & H
Examination of the international emergence of the field of womens studies; the achievements and limitations of scholarly work exploring oppression and discrimination based on sex and sex differences; the development of the category "gender" and its uses and abuses; and the relevance of changing understandings of the term "culture" for the study of women, gender, and/or sexuality across diverse historical periods, regions, nations, and societies. Exploration of a series of case studies. Particular attention devoted to the ways in which "gender" as practice, performance, and representation has differed for women and men according to race, class, and other divisions.

G102: Sexual Politics (3 cr.) S & H
Investigation of cross-cultural meaning for the term "sexual politics," from Kate Millet's classic 1970 text to those offered by historians, social scientists, and other critics analyzing political structures, processes and mobilizations around sex, sex differences and sexual practices and statuses, including the inextricable links between sexual politics and "other/ mainstream"politics.

G104: Topics in Gender Studies (1-3 cr.)
Analysis of selected ideas, trends, and problems in the study of gender across academic disciplines. Explores a particular theme or themes and also provides critical introduction to the challenges of analyzing gender within the framework of different disciplines of knowledge. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

G105: Sex, Gender and the Body (3 cr.) S & H
Examines the diverse and historically varying relationships forged between biological sex, culturally formulated discourses of masculinity and femininity, and the sexed body. With variable title and themes, the course may employ a range of different approaches, depending on the instructor.

G205: Themes in Gender Studies (1-3 cr.)
Exploration of a theme or series of themes arising from the study of gender, generally from within a particular discipline or subfield. The course will provide some critical reflection upon the challenges of analyzing gender within the framework of different disciplines of knowledge. Focus on specific instances, topics, or case studies, depending on the instructor. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

G206: Gay Histories, Queer Cultures (3 cr.) S & H
Examines the social, cultural, and political history of same-sex relationships and desires in the United States and abroad, emphasizing the historical emergence of certain American sexual subcultures, such as the modern lesbian and gay "movement" or "community." The course also highlights particular formations such as race, class, and regional difference that interrupt unified, universal narratives of lesbian and gay history.

G215: Sex and Gender in Cross Cultural Perspective (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
Investigation of forms in which gender, gender markings, gender meanings, and gender relations are arranged in different cultures of the world. Assessment of debates concerning the global salience of feminist claims about women's "oppression," political mobilization around gender, body rituals marking masculinity and femininity, indigenous women, and resistance to gender formations beyond Euro-American borders.

G225: Gender, Sexuality, and Popular Culture (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
Examination of popular cultural "makings" of masculinity, femininity, and sexuality through typical representation of gender within fiction, theater, cinema, radio, music, television, journalism, and other secular mass media. Analysis of the developing international telecommunications "superhighway" and struggles to secure increased representation of women and of feminist perspectives within existing culture industries.

G230: Gendered Relations (3 cr.) S & H
Examines the gendered dynamics of social relations. Explores how gender and sexuality are imagined, constructed, and lived within a diverse set of institutions and cultural locations, such as the military, the antebellum slave plantation, the global sex market, the hospital, and the contemporary workplace.

G235: Scientific Understandings of Sex and Gender (3 cr.) S & H
Interrogates the evolution of scientific approaches to, and conceptualizations of, the terminology of sex and gender from the perspective of the behavioral, medical, and social sciences. Topics may include: femininity, masculinity, and androgyny; femaleness, maleness, intersex, and transgender; heterosexuality, homosexuality, and bisexuality.

G250: Race, Sexuality, and Culture (Intersections) (3 cr.) CASE A&H, CASE DUS
Examines the construction of sexuality and sexuality studies while analyzing the intersection of race and ethnicity in the production of knowledge and particular social categories that shape racial communities and sexual cultures. May employ a range of different approaches, depending on the instructor.

G290: History of Feminist Thought and Practice (3 cr.) A & H
Introduction to historical and contemporary feminists. Critical focus is placed on criteria by which attributes of identifiable feminist discourses and their contexts may be evaluated. Disputes among feminist theorists with regard to the pertinence of differences ordained by sexuality, race, class, ethnicity, and other political and philosophical adherence emerge as central themes for appraisal.

G300: Gender Studies: Core Concepts and Key Debates (3 cr.) IW
P:
G101
Examination of the field of gender studies. Students will explore a series of themes through which gender is discussed, analyzed, and defined. Conceptual frameworks of gender, theories of sexuality, and the cultural and historical construction of the body are emphasized. Examination of gender as a contested category ranging across categories of race, ethnicity, class, and nationality.

G302: Issues in Gender Studies (1-3 cr.)
This topical, variably titled course addresses selected ideas, trends, and problems in the study of gender across academic disciplines. It explores a particular theme or themes and also provides critical reflection upon the challenges of analyzing gender within the framework of different disciplines of knowledge. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

G303: Knowledge and Sex (3 cr.) S & H
Exploration of debates about knowledge as cultural production or representation, implicated in contemporary understandings of gender and sexual difference. Feminist critiques of various disciplines and fields are interrogated, in terms of their justifiability and coherence. Significant differences in interpretations offered by such critics are identified, and their impact upon areas of knowledge during the twentieth century are assessed.

G304: Constructions of Masculinity (3 cr.) S & H
An interdisciplinary examination of what constitutes (and has historically constituted) masculinity. Designed to illuminate the contested underpinnings of masculinity.

G310: Representation and the Body (3 cr.) A & H
Analysis of scholarship concerned with how the body is perceived, represented, and symbolically charged. This course examines concepts that include sexed bodies, desiring bodies, corporeality, body politics, and sociological bodily rituals. Thematically, the course investigates exterior/interior, solid/fluid, and sex/gender distinctions critical to discussions of the body.

G325: Technologies of Gender (3 cr.) S & H
Investigates "gendered"ways that technological transformations reshape social life, physical space, built environments, or medical research. Familiarizes students with how feminist inquiry remaps such fields as computer technology, urban and development studies, geography, medicine, or health sciences. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

G330:Looking Like a Feminist: Visual Culture and Critical Theory (3 cr.) A & H
Advanced study of feminist film theory which examines gender in popular film from a variety of perspectives. Examines how cinema works as a "technology of gender,"how film constructs subject positions and identities, and what these constructions can tell us about how gender structures our culture.

G335: Explaining Sex/Gender Differences (3 cr.) S & H
Compares biological, psychological, and social theories regarding the development and maintenance of gender differentiated behavior, gender and sexual identities, and the meaning of sexed bodies. The course scrutinizes the social and cultural forces that magnify, minimize, or subvert the expression of gender differences.

G340: Gender, Geography, Sex, and Space (3 cr.) S & H
Examines the crucially important role that space and place play in the construction and maintenance of gender norms and sexual practices. Subjects may include the gendered history of the domestic domain, feminist critiques of architecture and urban planning, the modernist art of flaneurie, or the gendered and racial politics of imprisonment in the United States.

G350: Queer Theory (3 cr.) A & H
Examines queer theory, particularly in relation to other intellectual/political movements (post-structuralism, critical race studies, feminism, gay and lesbian studies) which it both borrowed from and challenged. Focus on the ways in which queer theory articulates a radical transformation of the sex/gender system in opposition to normalizing and essentializing impulses.

G399: Regulating Gender (3 cr.) S & H
Explores the regulation of gender relations through the institutions of state, church, and/ or civil society, including: public policies; laws and their enforcement; religions; ethical and moral norms; and other social conventions and cultural norms. Strong focus on cross-cultural and transnational comparisons. May be thematically concentrated around case studies.

G402: Problems in Gender Studies (1-3 cr.)
Topical seminar in gender studies. Analysis of a particular issue or problem that has generated debate within gender-related scholarship in a particular discipline, or across several disciplines/fields of inquiry. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

G410: International Feminist Debates (3 cr.) CSA
Investigation of debates among feminists as to whether aspirations towards global feminism are possible and desirable. The course compares concerns about the global situation of women, as articulated by international bodies such as the United Nations, with concerns articulated by feminists in different parts of the world.

G425: Gender and Science: The Sexual Politics of Truth (3 cr.) S & H
Examination of interdisciplinary interaction of feminist perspectives on science. Perspectives are diverse and have implications for different scientific disciplines medical, physical, natural, and social. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

G430: Kinsey's Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (1953): Genealogies and Legacies (3 cr.) S & H
Examines Kinsey's Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (1953) by undertaking an examination of the text itself, and its scientific, cultural, and sexual politics context, as well as its place in the genealogy of sexology and sex research and its impact and influence after Kinsey's death in 1956.

G435: Health, Sex, and Gender (3 cr.) S & H
Examines health as it relates to female and male sexuality and to the roles and status of men and women in society. It explores public policy decisions related to medical research practices. Topics may include research about adult sexuality and personal health, contraception, sexual abuse, gender-specific diseases, and sexually transmitted diseases.

G440: Feminism Between Woman Suffrage and the Pill (3 cr.) S & H
What happened to feminism between the suffrage movement and the "swinging sixties"? Was feminism dead, or did it actually transform? How similar and how different was feminism before 1920 and after? Could a higher understanding of feminism in these decades recharacterize twentieth-century feminism as a whole?

G480: Practicum in Gender Studies (3-6 cr., 6 cr. max.)
P:
Junior or senior standing; 12 credit hours of gender studies course work; consent of faculty advisor and department.
Directed study of issues or policies related to gender or sexuality based on a field experience such as an internship. Directed readings, papers and/or an analytical journal may be required.

G485: Gender and Discourse (3 cr.)
Advanced-level analysis of cultural constitutions of gender in different cultures. Emphasis on understanding how different discourses operate with respect to gender, and how they can have a range of effects, including endorsement, unsettling, and resisting prevailing gender relations. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

G490 Gender, Race, Sexuality, and the Law (3 cr.)
Examines the complex ways in which the law structures and is shaped by gender, race, and sexuality.

G495: Readings and Research in Gender Studies (1-3 cr., 6 cr. max.)
P: Consent of instructor and department.

Individual readings and research available for gender studies major and minor students. May, under unusual circumstances, be repeated twice for credit with a different topic.

G498: Seminar in Gender Studies (3 cr.)
This course will highlight a particular problem, theme, or controversy confronting the interdisciplinary field of gender studies, situated in relation to the development of gender studies since the 1970s and its institutional and discursive setting.

G499: Senior Honors Thesis (3-6 cr.)
P: Consent of faculty honors thesis advisor and department.

Research and preparation of senior honors thesis. May be taken for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

 

Fall 2014

G101: Gender, Culture, and Society (3 cr.) A & H
Examination of the international emergence of the field of women’s studies; the achievements and limitations of scholarly work exploring oppression and discrimination based on sex and sex differences; the development of the category "gender" and its uses and abuses; and the relevance of changing understandings of the term "culture" for the study of women, gender, and/or sexuality across diverse historical periods, regions, nations, and societies. Exploration of a series of case studies. Particular attention devoted to the ways in which "gender" as practice, performance, and representation has differed for women and men according to race, class, and other divisions.

Section 8660 (Honors): 02:30P-03:45P MW – Instructor: Sanders, S; RA B111
Section 12743: 9:05 – 9:55am MWF – Instructor: TBA; BH 331
Section 12744: 10:10 – 11:00am MWF – Instructor: TBA; BH331
Section 12745: 11:15 – 12:05pm MWF – Instructor: Kachwala, S; BH 138
Section 12746: 10:10 – 11:00am MWF – Instructor: Kachwala, S; BH138
Section 12747: 11:15 – 12:05pm MWF – Instructor: Marcotte, A; BH331
Section 12748: 1:25 – 2:15pm MWF – Instructor: Marcotte, A; BH331
Section 12749: 10:10 – 11:00am MWF – Instructor: TBA; WH 109
Section 12750: 11:15 – 12:05pm MWF – Instructor: TBA; WH 109
Section 13781: 2:30 – 3:20pm MWF – Instructor: Brennan; BH 331
Section 13783: 03:35 – 4:25PM MWF – Instructor: Brennan; BH 331


G104: Topics in Gender Studies (3 cr.)
Analysis of selected ideas, trends, and problems in the study of gender across academic disciplines. Explores a particular theme or themes and also provides critical introduction to the challenges of analyzing gender within the framework of different disciplines of knowledge. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

- Beyond Legally Blond: Gender, Greek Life, & Popular Culture
Lecture: 2:30-3:45pm MW – Instructor: Scott, J.; BH 208 COLL (CASE) S&H
This course seeks to introduce students to the major scholarship and debates regarding college fraternities and sororities both historically and contemporarily. This course will neither serve as a Greek appreciation course nor as a Greek degradation course. Rather, this course will provide a critical engagement with the cultural site of Greek societies. We will accomplish this by drawing on both academic accounts of fraternities and sororities and more popular and mainstream literature. Specifically, we will trace the origins of both men’s and women’s fraternities and sororities paying specific attention to the concepts of race, specifically whiteness, class, campus climate, public opinion and acceptance/rejection of Greek culture, and interactions between Greek and non-Greek individuals. Additionally, we will examine the same themes in the contemporary moment broadening our scope to include social media sites and popular culture.

- Gender, Islam, and Difference
Lecture: 4:00pm-5:15pm – Instructor: Sincoff-Yedid; BH015 COLL (CASE) S&H, COLL (CASE) GCC
Given the rising prominence of questions and debates about gender and Islam in the US and around the world, the need for greater understanding of how Islam views gender and sexuality and shapes adherents' behaviors has also grown. This course provides an interdisciplinary, topical introduction to Islam and gender through the lens of Gender Studies. It will focus primarily on the Muslim world, including the Arab world, Africa, and Southeast Asia. After an introduction to Islam as a religion and its specific texts concerning gender and sexuality, the following topics will be explored in greater detail: love and sex in Islam; Islam, the West, and modernity; and gender essentialism and Islamic feminisms. The course will also critically interrogate the study of religion, and Islam in particular, in the field of Gender Studies, thinking through how we can simultaneously acknowledge social construction and authentically study religion.


G105: Sex, Gender & The Body (3 cr.) S & H, IUB GENED S&H
Examines the diverse and historically varying relationships forged between biological sex, culturally formulated discourses of masculinity and femininity, and the sexed body. With variable title and themes, the course may employ a range of different approaches, depending on the instructor.

Lecture: 11:15am-12:05pm MW - Instructor: Foster, L (section: 3151) BH310

Discussion Sections:

12742 12:20P-01:10P M BH 206 Foster L
12738 10:10A-11:00A F BH 229 Goldberg S
12740 11:15A-12:05P F SY 0006 TBA
14367 11:15A-12:05P F BH 229 Goldberg S
12741 12:20P-01:10P F SY 0006 TBA
14365 02:30P-03:20P F SY 0006 TBA
14366 02:30P-03:20P F BH 335 Goldberg S



G205: Themes in Gender Studies
(3 cr.)
Exploration of a theme or series of themes arising from the study of gender, generally from within a particular discipline or subfield. The course will provide some critical reflection upon the challenges of analyzing gender within the framework of different disciplines of knowledge. Focus on specific instances, topics, or case studies, depending on the instructor. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

- From Sideshow Freaks to Wheelchair Divas: Gender, Disability, and Popular Culture
Lecture: 5:45 – 7:00pm TR – Instructor: Cleary, K; WH 119
From TLC’s The Little Couple to Lady Gaga to standup comedian Josh Blue, images of people with disabilities at once repel and attract viewers. In this class, we will explore representations of disability in film, television, social media, memoir, and other pop culture mediums across history and into the present. The beginning of the course will introduce students to the field of disability studies and its relevance to gender and media studies. Through an interdisciplinary lens, students will consider how people with disabilities were and are represented in the media with particular attention to how disability intersects with gender, race, sexuality, and class identity. We will also consider how people with disabilities have responded to these representations and utilized media outlets to represent themselves and produce culture on their own terms.

- Money Sex and the Economy
Lecture: 4:00 – 5:15pm MW – Instructor: Montes Ireland; BH 247
What are the economic, political, and institutional conditions that create gendered inequality? Utilizing gender as a lens to explore money and power in the home, the workplace, and in politics, we will examine how social justice and gender equity is entangled with demand for, particularly, women's labor inside and outside the home. We will discuss this overarching theme through a diverse range of topics such as mothering and reproductive labor, sex work and the transnational sex trade, domestic and service sector work, the global assembly line, immigration, welfare, the gendered and raced wealth gap, entrepreneurship, and globalization.



G225: Gender, Sexuality, and Popular Culture
(3 cr.) A & H, CSA, Diversity
Examination of popular cultural "makings" of masculinity, femininity, and sexuality through typical representation of gender within fiction, theater, cinema, radio, music, television, journalism, and other secular mass media. Analysis of the developing international telecommunications "superhighway" and struggles to secure increased representation of women and of feminist perspectives within existing culture industries.

Lecture Sections
:
8662 01:00P-02:15P TR BH 204 Maher J
11804 02:30P-03:45P TR WH 101 Maher J
8663 11:15A-12:30P MW BH 347 TBA
18203 01:00P-02:15P MW BH 204 TBA



G250: Race, Sexuality and Culture (3 cr.) CASE A& H, DUS

Examines the construction of sexuality and sexuality studies while analyzing the intersection of race and ethnicity in the production of knowledge and particular social categories that shape racial communities and sexual cultures. May employ a range of different approaches, depending on the instructor.

Lecture: 30364 04:00P-05:15P TR BH 233 Instructor: TBA



G300: Core Concepts & Key Debates
(3 cr.) IW
Examination of the field of gender studies. Students will explore a series of themes through which gender is discussed, analyzed, and defined. Conceptual frameworks of gender, theories of sexuality, and the cultural and historical construction of the body are emphasized. Examination of gender as a contested category ranging across categories of race, ethnicity, class, and nationality.

Lecture
: 15805 11:15A-12:30P TR BH 137 Frazier L


G302: Issues in Gender Studies (3 cr.) S
This topical, variably titled course addresses selected ideas, trends, and problems in the study of gender across academic disciplines. It explores a particular theme or themes and also provides critical reflection upon the challenges of analyzing gender within the framework of different disciplines of knowledge. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

- Gender and Reproductive Technology/Justice

Lecture: 15205 11:15A-12:30P TR BH 233 Maher J

This class examines the politics of reproduction in America.  As a Gender Studies class, we will draw from a variety of disciplines—history, sociology, cultural studies, feminist legal theory, technology studies—in order to explore how reproduction reflects and creates our perceptions of gender, power, and cultural identity.  As such, we will touch on a variety of issues (though certainly not all of them) in the field of human reproduction, including abortion, masculinity, assisted reproduction, and race and reproductive justice.

- Gender, Sexuality and School
Lecture: 34509 05:45P-07:00P TR BH 240 Powell M

This course explores the ways that schools (K-college) produce and perpetuate (and perhaps challenge and call into question) normative notions of gender and sexuality. Starting from the assumption that school are sites of ideological management and reproduction, we consider a variety of topics including:

  • Youth and innocence
  • Politics of sex education
  • The sexualities of students and teachers
  • Queer interventions in schools
  • The making of “boys” and “girls”
  • Gender, sexuality, schools, and pop culture

- Bollywood and Gender
Lecture: 31374 02:30P-03:45P TR BH 137 Holtzman, D

Bollywood cinema has proved a highly effective means of promoting a pan-Indian agenda that supersedes differences of religion, language, ethnicity, gender and sexual preference within the largest democracy in the world. Beginning with the introduction of the cinematic apparatus to the sub-continent; the course will examine popular cinema as a reflection of India’s navigation of the tradition/modernity binary since gaining independence in 1947. The course will focus on Bollywood films as vehicles for promoting and disseminating socio-politic, cultural, and national ideologies.

- Black Feminist Literature
Lecture: 34694 04:00P-05:15P TR WH 121 Wester M
This course investigates representations of Black women using a Black Feminist framework. We will investigate how these representations are characterized through intersectional paradigms of race, gender, class, and sexuality. More importantly, this course will explore how various authors contest, subvert, destabilize and, in one cases, perpetuate stereotypical images of Black women. We will discover the ways in which Black women writers have not only attempted to complicate and expand ideologies defining Black womanhood, but have also attempted to challenge dominant definitions of “normativity” and redefine the dynamics of romantic and familial relationships.


G310: Representation and The Body (3 cr.) A & H
Analysis of scholarship concerned with how the body is perceived, represented, and symbolically charged. This course examines concepts that include sexed bodies, desiring bodies, corporeality, body politics, and sociological bodily rituals. Thematically, the course investigates exterior/interior, solid/fluid, and sex/gender distinctions critical to discussions of the body.

Lecture
: 17072 04:00P-05:15P MW BH 209 Horton-Stallings L



G350: Queer Theory (3 cr.) A& H
Examines queer theory, particularly in relation to other intellectual/political movements (post-structuralism, critical race studies, feminism, gay and lesbian studies) which it both borrowed from and challenged. Focus on the ways in which queer theory articulates a radical transformation of the sex/gender system in opposition to normalizing and essentializing impulses.

Lecture: 29469 1:00pm – 2:15pm – TR – Instructor: Johnson, C



G402: Problems in Gender Studies
(1-3 cr.)
Topical seminar in gender studies. Analysis of a particular issue or problem that has generated debate within gender-related scholarship in a particular discipline, or across several disciplines/fields of inquiry. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

- Queer Looks: Post-Stonewall Visual Culture
Lecture: 17544 11:15A-12:30P TR SY 212 Holtzman, D

What is the relationship between sexuality and visibility? What does it mean for a person to look “gay” or “straight”? This course will explore the various ways in which queer sexuality and the struggle for LGBTQIA equality has become increasingly visible following the Stonewall Uprising of 1969.We will chart the history of the gay rights movement while also analyzing shifting representations of sexuality through discussion of queer visual arts, film, media and other forms of popular culture. Focusing on representations of queer life as well as GLBTQIA characters and communities, we will study works of contemporary American art; mainstream, underground and independent cinema and popular music since the 1960s.

- On the Move Across Asia (3 cr.) COLL (CASE) S&H, GCC
Lecture: 33560 02:30P-03:45P TR AC C116 Friedman S

On the Move Across Asia: Gender, Migration, and Mobility


G480: Practicum in Gender Studies (3-6 cr., 6 cr. max.)

P: Junior or senior standing; 12 credit hours of gender studies course work; consent of faculty advisor and department.

Directed study of issues or policies related to gender or sexuality based on a field experience such as an internship. Directed readings, papers and/or an analytical journal may be required.

Instructor: Horton-Stallings; ARR


G495: Undergraduate Readings and Research in Gender Studies (1-3 cr.)
P: Consent of instructor and department. Individual readings and research available for gender studies major and minor students. May, under unusual circumstances, be repeated twice for credit with a different topic.


G498: Seminar in Gender Studies (1-3 cr.)
This course will highlight a particular problem, theme, or controversy confronting the interdisciplinary field of gender studies, situated in relation to the development of gender studies since the 1970s and its institutional and discursive setting.

- Women Writers of Color (3 cr.) COLL (CASE) A&H, DUS
Lecture: 30383 05:45P-07:00P MW BH 135 Horton-Stallings L

This class will examine the revolutionary narrative in the literature and culture of women of color across the globe, with specific attention to how the work of these women writers have intervened on representations of U.S. imperialism and the masculinization of revolutionary rhetoric, ideology, and methods of self-determination in the Americas. We will do this by asking how these women have developed their own identities and subjectivities in opposition to or in accordance with societal constraints and restrictions for their bodies and subjectivities. By reading both historical and popular texts by women of color, we will glean how their perspectives on gender, sexuality, class, race, and nation have challenged patriarchy and racism within and against white feminist traditions.

This course will interrogate concepts and definitions of literacy, intelligence, knowledge, and revolution in Ethnic American literature and culture focused on women in the Americas (U.S. & Canada) from the late 20th century to the present. We will ask how their focus on the intersectionality of race, nation, sexuality, and gender influence their revised representation of revolution and the importance of literacy to liberation. The class will focus on six major issues: (1) colonization, language and written tradition; (2) how other cultural forms emphasize cultural literacy as a way to decolonize learning and literacy; (3) sexual and spiritual decolonization; (4) gender, race, and nation; (5) private and public spaces and borders for identity and culture; (6) consumption/abjection of raced and queer bodies


G499: Senior Honors Thesis (3-6 cr.)
P: Consent of faculty honors thesis advisor and department.

Research and preparation of senior honors thesis. May be taken for a maximum of 6 credit hours.



Upcoming Courses for Spring 2015 will be announced in Fall 2014.