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Undergraduate Courses

Complete Offerings

G101: Gender, Culture, and Society (3 cr.) A & H
Examination of the international emergence of the field of womens studies; the achievements and limitations of scholarly work exploring oppression and discrimination based on sex and sex differences; the development of the category "gender" and its uses and abuses; and the relevance of changing understandings of the term "culture" for the study of women, gender, and/or sexuality across diverse historical periods, regions, nations, and societies. Exploration of a series of case studies. Particular attention devoted to the ways in which "gender" as practice, performance, and representation has differed for women and men according to race, class, and other divisions.

G102: Sexual Politics (3 cr.) S & H
Investigation of cross-cultural meaning for the term "sexual politics," from Kate Millet's classic 1970 text to those offered by historians, social scientists, and other critics analyzing political structures, processes and mobilizations around sex, sex differences and sexual practices and statuses, including the inextricable links between sexual politics and "other/ mainstream"politics.

G104: Topics in Gender Studies (1-3 cr.)
Analysis of selected ideas, trends, and problems in the study of gender across academic disciplines. Explores a particular theme or themes and also provides critical introduction to the challenges of analyzing gender within the framework of different disciplines of knowledge. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

G105: Sex, Gender and the Body (3 cr.) S & H
Examines the diverse and historically varying relationships forged between biological sex, culturally formulated discourses of masculinity and femininity, and the sexed body. With variable title and themes, the course may employ a range of different approaches, depending on the instructor.

G205: Themes in Gender Studies (1-3 cr.)
Exploration of a theme or series of themes arising from the study of gender, generally from within a particular discipline or subfield. The course will provide some critical reflection upon the challenges of analyzing gender within the framework of different disciplines of knowledge. Focus on specific instances, topics, or case studies, depending on the instructor. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

G206: Gay Histories, Queer Cultures (3 cr.) S & H
Examines the social, cultural, and political history of same-sex relationships and desires in the United States and abroad, emphasizing the historical emergence of certain American sexual subcultures, such as the modern lesbian and gay "movement" or "community." The course also highlights particular formations such as race, class, and regional difference that interrupt unified, universal narratives of lesbian and gay history.

G215: Sex and Gender in Cross Cultural Perspective (3 cr.) S & H, CSA
Investigation of forms in which gender, gender markings, gender meanings, and gender relations are arranged in different cultures of the world. Assessment of debates concerning the global salience of feminist claims about women's "oppression," political mobilization around gender, body rituals marking masculinity and femininity, indigenous women, and resistance to gender formations beyond Euro-American borders.

G225: Gender, Sexuality, and Popular Culture (3 cr.) A & H, CSA
Examination of popular cultural "makings" of masculinity, femininity, and sexuality through typical representation of gender within fiction, theater, cinema, radio, music, television, journalism, and other secular mass media. Analysis of the developing international telecommunications "superhighway" and struggles to secure increased representation of women and of feminist perspectives within existing culture industries.

G230: Gendered Relations (3 cr.) S & H
Examines the gendered dynamics of social relations. Explores how gender and sexuality are imagined, constructed, and lived within a diverse set of institutions and cultural locations, such as the military, the antebellum slave plantation, the global sex market, the hospital, and the contemporary workplace.

G235: Scientific Understandings of Sex and Gender (3 cr.) S & H
Interrogates the evolution of scientific approaches to, and conceptualizations of, the terminology of sex and gender from the perspective of the behavioral, medical, and social sciences. Topics may include: femininity, masculinity, and androgyny; femaleness, maleness, intersex, and transgender; heterosexuality, homosexuality, and bisexuality.

G250: Race, Sexuality, and Culture (Intersections) (3 cr.) CASE A&H, CASE DUS
Examines the construction of sexuality and sexuality studies while analyzing the intersection of race and ethnicity in the production of knowledge and particular social categories that shape racial communities and sexual cultures. May employ a range of different approaches, depending on the instructor.

G290: History of Feminist Thought and Practice (3 cr.) A & H
Introduction to historical and contemporary feminists. Critical focus is placed on criteria by which attributes of identifiable feminist discourses and their contexts may be evaluated. Disputes among feminist theorists with regard to the pertinence of differences ordained by sexuality, race, class, ethnicity, and other political and philosophical adherence emerge as central themes for appraisal.

G300: Gender Studies: Core Concepts and Key Debates (3 cr.) IW
P:
G101
Examination of the field of gender studies. Students will explore a series of themes through which gender is discussed, analyzed, and defined. Conceptual frameworks of gender, theories of sexuality, and the cultural and historical construction of the body are emphasized. Examination of gender as a contested category ranging across categories of race, ethnicity, class, and nationality.

G302: Issues in Gender Studies (1-3 cr.)
This topical, variably titled course addresses selected ideas, trends, and problems in the study of gender across academic disciplines. It explores a particular theme or themes and also provides critical reflection upon the challenges of analyzing gender within the framework of different disciplines of knowledge. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

G303: Knowledge and Sex (3 cr.) S & H
Exploration of debates about knowledge as cultural production or representation, implicated in contemporary understandings of gender and sexual difference. Feminist critiques of various disciplines and fields are interrogated, in terms of their justifiability and coherence. Significant differences in interpretations offered by such critics are identified, and their impact upon areas of knowledge during the twentieth century are assessed.

G304: Constructions of Masculinity (3 cr.) S & H
An interdisciplinary examination of what constitutes (and has historically constituted) masculinity. Designed to illuminate the contested underpinnings of masculinity.

G310: Representation and the Body (3 cr.) A & H
Analysis of scholarship concerned with how the body is perceived, represented, and symbolically charged. This course examines concepts that include sexed bodies, desiring bodies, corporeality, body politics, and sociological bodily rituals. Thematically, the course investigates exterior/interior, solid/fluid, and sex/gender distinctions critical to discussions of the body.

G325: Technologies of Gender (3 cr.) S & H
Investigates "gendered"ways that technological transformations reshape social life, physical space, built environments, or medical research. Familiarizes students with how feminist inquiry remaps such fields as computer technology, urban and development studies, geography, medicine, or health sciences. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

G330:Looking Like a Feminist: Visual Culture and Critical Theory (3 cr.) A & H
Advanced study of feminist film theory which examines gender in popular film from a variety of perspectives. Examines how cinema works as a "technology of gender,"how film constructs subject positions and identities, and what these constructions can tell us about how gender structures our culture.

G335: Explaining Sex/Gender Differences (3 cr.) S & H
Compares biological, psychological, and social theories regarding the development and maintenance of gender differentiated behavior, gender and sexual identities, and the meaning of sexed bodies. The course scrutinizes the social and cultural forces that magnify, minimize, or subvert the expression of gender differences.

G340: Gender, Geography, Sex, and Space (3 cr.) S & H
Examines the crucially important role that space and place play in the construction and maintenance of gender norms and sexual practices. Subjects may include the gendered history of the domestic domain, feminist critiques of architecture and urban planning, the modernist art of flaneurie, or the gendered and racial politics of imprisonment in the United States.

G350: Queer Theory (3 cr.) A & H
Examines queer theory, particularly in relation to other intellectual/political movements (post-structuralism, critical race studies, feminism, gay and lesbian studies) which it both borrowed from and challenged. Focus on the ways in which queer theory articulates a radical transformation of the sex/gender system in opposition to normalizing and essentializing impulses.

G399: Regulating Gender (3 cr.) S & H
Explores the regulation of gender relations through the institutions of state, church, and/ or civil society, including: public policies; laws and their enforcement; religions; ethical and moral norms; and other social conventions and cultural norms. Strong focus on cross-cultural and transnational comparisons. May be thematically concentrated around case studies.

G402: Problems in Gender Studies (1-3 cr.)
Topical seminar in gender studies. Analysis of a particular issue or problem that has generated debate within gender-related scholarship in a particular discipline, or across several disciplines/fields of inquiry. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

G410: International Feminist Debates (3 cr.) CSA
Investigation of debates among feminists as to whether aspirations towards global feminism are possible and desirable. The course compares concerns about the global situation of women, as articulated by international bodies such as the United Nations, with concerns articulated by feminists in different parts of the world.

G425: Gender and Science: The Sexual Politics of Truth (3 cr.) S & H
Examination of interdisciplinary interaction of feminist perspectives on science. Perspectives are diverse and have implications for different scientific disciplines medical, physical, natural, and social. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

G430: Kinsey's Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (1953): Genealogies and Legacies (3 cr.) S & H
Examines Kinsey's Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (1953) by undertaking an examination of the text itself, and its scientific, cultural, and sexual politics context, as well as its place in the genealogy of sexology and sex research and its impact and influence after Kinsey's death in 1956.

G435: Health, Sex, and Gender (3 cr.) S & H
Examines health as it relates to female and male sexuality and to the roles and status of men and women in society. It explores public policy decisions related to medical research practices. Topics may include research about adult sexuality and personal health, contraception, sexual abuse, gender-specific diseases, and sexually transmitted diseases.

G440: Feminism Between Woman Suffrage and the Pill (3 cr.) S & H
What happened to feminism between the suffrage movement and the "swinging sixties"? Was feminism dead, or did it actually transform? How similar and how different was feminism before 1920 and after? Could a higher understanding of feminism in these decades recharacterize twentieth-century feminism as a whole?

G480: Practicum in Gender Studies (3-6 cr., 6 cr. max.)
P:
Junior or senior standing; 12 credit hours of gender studies course work; consent of faculty advisor and department.
Directed study of issues or policies related to gender or sexuality based on a field experience such as an internship. Directed readings, papers and/or an analytical journal may be required.

G485: Gender and Discourse (3 cr.)
Advanced-level analysis of cultural constitutions of gender in different cultures. Emphasis on understanding how different discourses operate with respect to gender, and how they can have a range of effects, including endorsement, unsettling, and resisting prevailing gender relations. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

G490 Gender, Race, Sexuality, and the Law (3 cr.)
Examines the complex ways in which the law structures and is shaped by gender, race, and sexuality.

G495: Readings and Research in Gender Studies (1-3 cr., 6 cr. max.)
P: Consent of instructor and department.

Individual readings and research available for gender studies major and minor students. May, under unusual circumstances, be repeated twice for credit with a different topic.

G498: Seminar in Gender Studies (3 cr.)
This course will highlight a particular problem, theme, or controversy confronting the interdisciplinary field of gender studies, situated in relation to the development of gender studies since the 1970s and its institutional and discursive setting.

G499: Senior Honors Thesis (3-6 cr.)
P: Consent of faculty honors thesis advisor and department.

Research and preparation of senior honors thesis. May be taken for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

 


Fall 2017 course offerings forthcoming



Spring 2017


G101: Gender, Culture, and Society
(3 cr.) A & H
Examination of the international emergence of the field of women’s studies; the achievements and limitations of scholarly work exploring oppression and discrimination based on sex and sex differences; the development of the category "gender" and its uses and abuses; and the relevance of changing understandings of the term "culture" for the study of women, gender, and/or sexuality across diverse historical periods, regions, nations, and societies. Exploration of a series of case studies. Particular attention devoted to the ways in which "gender" as practice, performance, and representation has differed for women and men according to race, class, and other divisions.

G101 COURSE SECTIONS



G104: Topics in Gender Studies (3 cr.)
Analysis of selected ideas, trends, and problems in the study of gender across academic disciplines. Explores a particular theme or themes and also provides critical introduction to the challenges of analyzing gender within the framework of different disciplines of knowledge. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

- Feminist Legal Theories S & H
Using a number of different feminist legal theories as a framework for discussion and analysis, this course will consider the effect of law on people based their gender, sex, race, class, sexual orientation, and other social identities. Topics will include reproductive justice, sexual harassment, poverty, incarceration, and the role of power and difference as well as feminist challenges to mainstream legal thought and processes.

Lecture: 2:20-3:45pm, MW – Instructor: Stephens, A.


- Freaks & Peeks: The Politics of Staring
Conjoined twins. Bearded ladies. People big and small. Exotic ethnics. Freak shows exhibited these and many other human “freaks” for entertainment and profit at circuses, dime museums, and boardwalks all across America at the turn of the 19th century. From TLC’s reality TV show The Little Couple to FX’s recent season of American Horror Story: Freakshow, images of “freaks” continue to at once attract and repel viewers. In this class we will learn the history of the American freak show and explore its legacy in today’s pop culture. We will consider how people with extraordinary bodies have been regarded as public spectacles and analyze how we are implicated in politics of staring. To do so, we will engage in critical interdisciplinary analyses of film, television, memoir, and other pop culture mediums.

Lecture: 4:00-5:15pm, TR – Instructor: Cleary, K.



G205: Themes in Gender Studies (3 cr.)
Exploration of a theme or series of themes arising from the study of gender, generally from within a particular discipline or subfield. The course will provide some critical reflection upon the challenges of analyzing gender within the framework of different disciplines of knowledge. Focus on specific instances, topics, or case studies, depending on the instructor. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

- Body Size & Media Cultures S&H
Body size is an important but often overlooked component of media cultures. Meanings of body size fluctuate based not only on their presence in different media, but also on their relationship to different identity and cultural factors, including gender, sexuality, and race. This course will analyze the meanings of body size through a variety of media cultures and identity factors, to better understand how body size functions not only in media, but also in our everyday lives. It will undertake this analysis through a historical overview of American media and culture, from the nineteenth century to now.

Lecture: 9:30-10:45am, TR – Instructor: Jones, J.

- Gender & Sexuality in Graphic Literature S&H
In this course, we’ll explore narrative and visual representations of gender and sexuality in graphic novels and comics. We’ll investigate the formal, rhetorical and story-telling techniques of graphic texts and build on close readings of the visual and literary features of this medium to reach an historical understanding of the modern dimensions of gendered and sexual experience in the context of particular racial, ethnic and national formations. No previous knowledge of comics or gender studies is required.

Lecture: 7:15-8:30pm, TR – Instructor: Rhodes, M.



G225: Gender, Sexuality, and Popular Culture (3 cr.) A&H, CSA, Diversity
Examination of popular cultural "makings" of masculinity, femininity, and sexuality through typical representation of gender within fiction, theater, cinema, radio, music, television, journalism, and other secular mass media. Analysis of the developing international telecommunications "superhighway" and struggles to secure increased representation of women and of feminist perspectives within existing culture industries.

G225 LECTURE SECTIONS



G300: Core Concepts & Key Debates (3 cr.) IW
Examination of the field of gender studies. Students will explore a series of themes through which gender is discussed, analyzed, and defined. Conceptual frameworks of gender, theories of sexuality, and the cultural and historical construction of the body are emphasized. Examination of gender as a contested category ranging across categories of race, ethnicity, class, and nationality.

Lecture
: 2:30-3:45pm, TR – Instructor: Taylor, C.



G302: Issues in Gender Studies (3 cr.)
This topical, variably titled course addresses selected ideas, trends, and problems in the study of gender across academic disciplines. It explores a particular theme or themes and also provides critical reflection upon the challenges of analyzing gender within the framework of different disciplines of knowledge. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

- Gender, Sexuality, & Race in the Modern German Imagination S&H, GCC
Ideas of gender, sexuality and race have deeply shaped the ways in which European societies worked, and saw themselves, throughout modernity. In this course, we begin by tracing how and where these ideas evolved: the claims that men and women are essentially different, the use of sexuality as a marker of personal identity and the force of racist distinctions between—implicitly white— “Germans” and “Blacks,” “Aryans” and Jews, or more recently (Christian) Germans and Muslim immigrants. We will then look at the ways in which these different distinctions have worked together—and sometimes against each other—in making individual and collective identities. We will also discuss the impact of political and social change, including the rise of fascism, post-war democratization processes, feminist and sexual liberation movements, decolonization and immigration.

The focus of the course is on German culture within the larger contexts of Europe, imperialism and globalization. The course is offered jointly for students in Germanic Studies, Gender Studies and European Studies. Lectures and discussions are in English; all readings and films are available in English or with English subtitles.

Lecture: 11:15am-12:30pm, TR – Instructor: Breger, C.



G310: Representation and the Body (3 cr.) A & H
Analysis of scholarship concerned with how the body is perceived, represented, and symbolically charged. This course examines concepts that include sexed bodies, desiring bodies, corporeality, body politics, and sociological bodily rituals. Thematically, the course investigates exterior/interior, solid/fluid, and sex/gender distinctions critical to discussions of the body.

Lecture: 1:00-2:15pm, MW – Instructor: Vaccaro, J.



G330: Looking Like a Feminist: Visual Culture & Critical Theory (3 cr.) A & H
Advanced study of feminist film theory which examines gender in popular film from a variety of perspectives. Examines how cinema works as a "technology of gender,"how film constructs subject positions and identities, and what these constructions can tell us about how gender structures our culture.

Lecture: 4:00-5:15pm, MW – Instructor: Vaccaro, J.



G335: Explaining Sex/Gender Differences (3 cr.) S & H
Compares biological, psychological, and social theories regarding the development and maintenance of gender differentiated behavior, gender and sexual identities, and the meaning of sexed bodies. The course scrutinizes the social and cultural forces that magnify, minimize, or subvert the expression of gender differences.

G335 COURSE SECTIONS



G350: Queer Theory (3 cr.) A & H
Examines queer theory, particularly in relation to other intellectual/political movements (post-structuralism, critical race studies, feminism, gay and lesbian studies) which it both borrowed from and challenged. Focus on the ways in which queer theory articulates a radical transformation of the sex/gender system in opposition to normalizing and essentializing impulses.

Lecture: 4:00-5:15pm, MW– Instructor: Fair, F.



G402: Problems in Gender Studies (1-3 cr.)
Topical seminar in gender studies. Analysis of a particular issue or problem that has generated debate within gender-related scholarship in a particular discipline, or across several disciplines/fields of inquiry. May be repeated with a different topic for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

- Sexuality & the Black Radical Tradition S & H, Div
This course focuses on black intellectual histories and political struggles for liberation at the intersection of sexuality and gender self-determination. Fred Moten asserts that “the history of blackness is testament to the fact that objects can and do resist.” His words will frame our inquiry into the construction of blackness with regard to its interaction with gender, sexuality, and capital in particular. Sexuality has been positioned as politically divisive specifically in relation to black political and social life, even as it has been used as a central tool of subjection. We will examine a variety of cultural materials on our way to developing a theory of black radicalism as it intersects with sexuality including: music, popular culture, literature, film, performance, dance, social movements, poetry, and historical and community archival practices. The materials we will engage with will help us develop an understanding of black resistant practices from slavery to the present.

Lecture: 9:30-10:45am, MW – Instructor: Fair, F.


- Gender, Race, & Disability in Science
This course examines ethical debates over new genetic technologies. In particular, it addresses debates over how reproductive technologies such as pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (“PGD”) are being used to make so called “designer babies” by discarding embryos of a certain sex and percentage chance of disability. It also examines how race-based genetic research is re-inscribing fixed notions of race as biological, rather than as social and political constructs. In doing so, students will learn how emerging genetic technologies give rise to new constructions of nature/culture and the social/biological that shift our understandings of sex, gender, race, and disability.

Lecture: 4:00-5:15pm, MW – Instructor: Foster, L.



G410: International Feminist Debates (3 cr.) CSA
Investigation of debates among feminists as to whether aspirations towards global feminism are possible and desirable. The course compares concerns about the global situation of women, as articulated by international bodies such as the United Nations, with concerns articulated by feminists in different parts of the world.

G410 COURSE SECTIONS



G498: Seminar in Gender Studies (3 cr.)
This course will highlight a particular problem, theme, or controversy confronting the interdisciplinary field of gender studies, situated in relation to the development of gender studies since the 1970s and its institutional and discursive setting.

- Gender & Material Culture (A & H)
This course examines the way that material objects both shape and are shaped by human beliefs about sex, gender and sexuality. We will consider how material objects manifest or embody such beliefs in various locations at different moments in history. We also consider how objects influence changing belief systems. As luck would have it, Indiana University Bloomington is home to a number of world-class museums with extraordinary collections of objects. Over the course of the semester we will make site visits to several of them including the IU Eskenazi Museum of Art, the Wylie House Museum, The Elizabeth Sage Historic Constume College, the Lilly Library, the University Archives, and the Kinsey Institute for the Study of Sex, Gender and Reproduction.

Lecture: 2:30-3:45pm, MW – Instructor: Johnson, C.




G480: Practicum in Gender Studies (3-6 cr., 6 cr. max.)
P: Junior or senior standing; 12 credit hours of gender studies course work; consent of faculty advisor and department.

Directed study of issues or policies related to gender or sexuality based on a field experience such as an internship. Directed readings, papers and/or an analytical journal may be required.



G495: Undergraduate Readings and Research in Gender Studies (1-3 cr.)
P: Consent of instructor and department. Individual readings and research available for gender studies major and minor students. May, under unusual circumstances, be repeated twice for credit with a different topic.