Indiana University Bloomington

News Archives 2010

December 11 - Celebration of Judson and Jane Mead

The celebration of the lives of Dr. and Mrs. Mead was held on Saturday, December 11 in the Tudor Room of the Indiana University Memorial Union. A light lunch was served after formal and informal memories of the lives of both are shared by the family and friends of the family.

 

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October 23: Faculty and students from Geological Sciences participate in the Physics and Astronomy Open House.

October: Faculty member Chen Zhu works with Alcoa and the DOE on carbon sequestration technology. MORE

October: Geological Sciences faculty and staff mourn the loss of Professors Judson Mead and Noel Krothe

September: Colloquim Schedule.

August: Classes begin on Monday August 30th.

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May: Student Awards Ceremony MORE

The annual GeoScience student awards ceremony was held on Tuesday, April 20th to honor the 2010 award winners.

April: GeoSciences and the Indiana Geological Survey WIN the IU Energy Challenge Competition MORE

The 2010 IU Energy Challenge began on March 25th, with more than 14,000 students, faculty and staff participating in the four-week competition to reduce energy and water consumption. All 11 residence halls, 26 Greek houses, and eight academic buildings compteted to achieve the greatest percent decrease in combined utility usage. This is the third year for the competition, which ran until April 22. The Department of Geological Sciences and the Indiana Geological Survey joined forces to create a GREEN TEAM to compete in the challenge. " Artwork credit: Indiana Geological Survey

March: Did changes in atmospheric CO2 coincide with latest Ordovician glacial-interglacial cycles? DOI

Seth A. Young, Matthew R. Saltzman, William I. Ausich, André Desrochers and Dimitri Kaljo. In press, Paleogeography, Paleoclimatology, Paleoecology

Ordovician/Silurian boundary at Pointe Laframboise, Anticosti Island, Quebec, Canada. The lower mound-like structures are Patch reefs in the Laframboise Member of the Ellis Bay Formation (Ordovician in age). They are abruptly overlain by the tabular carbonates of the Becscie Formation (Silurian in age).

 

Ordovician/Silurian boundary at Pointe Laframboise, Anticosti Island, Quebec, Canada. The lower mound-like structures are Patch reefs in the Laframboise Member of the Ellis Bay Formation (Ordovician in age). They are abruptly overlain by the tabular carbonates of the Becscie Formation (Silurian in age).
Corals and the reefs that they commonly form took a major hit in the major mass extinction event (2nd- largest in Earth's history) associated with end-Ordovician glaciation and fluctuations in carbon dioxide levels and sea surface temperatures.

March: Crossroads Geology Conference Schedule of Events (PDF)

The Crossroads Geology Conference was held in the Geology building on the Indiana University Bloomington campus on March 5th and 6th , 2010. The theme of the conference was Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Intriguing Questions in Today's Geosciences.

We had informal interviews with academic and industry professionals; Patrick Ducey was the coordinator and contact person for the conference..

January: Understanding the Haiti Earthquake

strike-slipFinite Fault Model Preliminary Result of the Jan 12, 2010 Mw 7.0 Haiti Earthquake Gavin Hayes, USGS.
Michael Hamburger's presentation "The Seismic Dimensions of the Port-au-Prince Earthquake" (PDF) IU Hatian Relief Effort

January 21, 2010: In response to the tragedy caused by the catastrophic earthquake that struck Haiti on Jan. 12, the Indiana University campus and Bloomington community will be conducting a series of events to raise both awareness and funds to benefit the people of Haiti. The initial event, titled "Decoding Disaster: Understanding the Haiti Earthquake of 2010," was held on the evening of January 21, 2010. The campus-community forum and call to action brought together faculty, staff, students, and community members interested in exploring the causes and consequences of this major natural disaster. More

January: “Underground gases tell the story of ice ages -- and America's split jet stream

IU Press Release: Deep underground aquifers in the American Southwest contain gases that tell of the region's ancient climate, and support a growing consensus that the jet stream over North America was once split in two.

The discoveries were made with a new paleohydrogeology tool, developed by Indiana University Bloomington geologist Chen Zhu and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology geologist Rolf Kipfer, that depends on the curious properties of noble gases as they seep through natural underground aquifers. MORE

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