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The Gill Center for Biomolecular Science

Gill Seminars

Previous Speakers

Upcoming Speakers

October 15, 2014
Matthias H. Tschöp, M.D.

Helmholtz Diabetes Center and Technische Universität München

Seminar will take place at 3:30 p.m. in the Indiana Memorial Union, Whittenberger Auditorium during the 2014 Gill Symposium

Title: The Metabolic Syndrome: A Brain Disease? 

Abstract: Pending.

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October 15, 2014
Scott Sternson, Ph.D.

HHMI, Janelia Farm Research Campus

Seminar will take place at 11:40 a.m. in the Indiana Memorial Union, Whittenberger Auditorium during the 2014 Gill Symposium

Title: The Neurobiology of Need

Abstract: Neural circuits essential for survival, such as those that mediate hunger, are shaped by selective pressure but involve flexible goal-directed actions. This is exemplified by starvation-sensitive AGRP neurons that are sufficient to rapidly coordinate voracious food seeking and consumption behaviors. We have used cell-type-specific techniques for neural circuit manipulation to examine the structural organization and motivational properties of AGRP neuron hunger circuits. We find that AGRP neuron circuits coordinate multiple processes controlling appetite through distinct circuit projections. In addition, AGRP neurons transmit a signal with negative valence that can serve a negative reinforcement teaching signal for food-seeking behavior. Similar characteristics are also found for a separate neuron population that controls thirst. Therefore, these homeostatic neurons provide a link between physiology and the emotional and motivational qualities of need states.

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October 15, 2014
Sabrina Diano, Ph.D.

Yale University School of Medicine

Seminar will take place at 10:30 a.m. in the Indiana Memorial Union, Whittenberger Auditorium during the 2014 Gill Symposium

Title: Free radicals in the central regulation of metabolism

Abstract: Pending.

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October 15, 2014
Tony K. T. Lam, Ph.D.

University of Toronto

Seminar will take place at 9:10 a.m. in the Indiana Memorial Union, Whittenberger Auditorium during the 2014 Gill Symposium

Title: CNS control of hepatic lipid and glucose metabolism

Abstract: Pending.

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October 15, 2014
Randy Seeley, Ph.D.

University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

Seminar will take place at 2:10 p.m. in the Indiana Memorial Union, Whittenberger Auditorium during the 2014 Gill Symposium

Title: Bariatric Surgery:  It’s not what you think it is.  Molecular targets for the effects of surgery on behavior and metabolism.

Abstract: While various bariatric surgeries provide both the largest and most durable weight loss of any currently available therapy, there remain great uncertainties around the mechanisms that produce such weight loss.  At least some surgical approaches also reduce obesity-related comorbidities including type 2 diabetes and hyperlipidemia.  These weight and metabolic successes put a premium on understanding how these surgeries exert their effects.  We have been using a variety of mouse models to test specific hypotheses about key molecular targets that mediate the benefits of bariatric surgery.  Bariatric surgery produces changes in a number of brain-gut signaling systems that result in profound changes in food intake and food selection.  In addition to typical gut hormones, bariatric surgery results in changes in bile acids and bile acid signaling that are crucial for many of the behavioral and metabolic effects of the surgery. 

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October 20, 2014
Norbert Fortin, Ph.D.

University of California, Irvine

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 p.m.

Title: The neurobiology of the memory for sequences of events: a synergistic approach in rats and humans

Abstract: It is well established that the ability to temporally organize information is fundamental to many perceptual, cognitive, and motor processes. Temporal organization is also critical to memory. In fact, since many of our memories have overlapping elements, including specific items and locations, our capacity to distinguish individual memories critically depends on remembering their unique temporal context. Unfortunately, while our understanding of how the brain processes the spatial context of memories has advanced considerably in recent years, our understanding of their temporal organization lags far behind. The overall objective of our research is to understand the fundamental neurobiological mechanisms underlying the memory for sequences of events and the memory for elapsed time. In this seminar, I will primarily focus on our recent work in rodents in which we used localized brain inactivations and single-cell recordings to help elucidate the contributions of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. I will also present recent findings from our parallel work in human subjects, which suggests that rats and humans use similar strategies, cognitive processes and neural circuits to remember sequences of items. I will conclude by discussing the importance of developing integrated, cross-species approaches to advance basic and clinical memory research. 

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January 26, 2015
Zuoxin Wang, Ph.D.

Florida State University

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 p.m.

Title: Pending

Abstract: Pending.

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February 2, 2015
Vania Apkarian, Ph.D.

Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 p.m.

Title: Pending

Abstract: Pending.

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February 23, 2015
Michael Bruchas, Ph.D.

Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 p.m.

Title: Pending

Abstract: Pending.

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March 30, 2015
Susan Amara, Ph.D.

University of Pittsburgh

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 p.m.

Title: Pending

Abstract: Pending.

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April 6, 2015
Cheryl Conrad, Ph.D.

Arizona State University

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 p.m.

Title: Pending

Abstract: Pending.

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April 13, 2015
Charles E. Schroeder, Ph.D.

Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

Seminar will be held in Psychology, Room 101 at 4:00 p.m.

Title: Pending

Abstract: Pending.