<SPEAKERS & TOPICS OF DISCUSSION>


< Prosodic Phonology Re-examined >

[1] Haruo Kubozono (Kobe University), Yoshihisa Kitagawa & Kenji Yoshida (Indiana University)

[2] Sun-Ah Jun (UCLA)

[3] Junko Ito & Armin Mester (UC Santa Cruz)



< Prosody and Syntax of Wh-interrogatives >

[4] Yuki Hirose (University of Tokyo) & Yoshihisa Kitagawa (Indiana University)

[5] Jennifer Smith (University of North Carolina)

[6] Yosuke Igarashi (National Institute for Japanese Language) & Yoshihisa Kitagawa (Indiana University)

[7] Norvin Richards (MIT)



< Information Packaging and Syntax >

[8] Caroline Féry and Shinichiro Ishihara (University of Potsdam)

[9] Satoshi Tomioka (University of Delaware)

[10] Sachie Kotani (University of Delaware)

[11] Yu-Yin Hsu (Indiana University)



< Experimental Syntax >

[12] Robert Kluender (UC San Diego)

[13] Kenji Yoshida & Yoshihisa Kitagawa (Indiana University)



[1] Haruo Kubozono (Kobe University), Yoshihisa Kitagawa & Kenji Yoshida (Indiana University)

"Prosodic Domain of Wh-questions in Japanese"

Report of a phonetic experiment involving downsteps to characterize the nature of the Wh-focus prosodic domain in Tokyo Japanese.

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[2] Sun-Ah Jun (UCLA)

"Defining and Explaining Prosodic Phrasing: An Overview"

In this talk, I will provide an overview of the ways of defining prosodic phrasing and how the prosodic phrasing defined by syntax matches (or does not match) the prosodic phrasing defined by intonation. Then, I will talk about problems in describing/ explaining prosodic phrasing, especially focus phrasing, based on recent experiments on Korean focus and the domain of pitch accent in English --- e.g., knowing the head does not mean knowing the edge of a phrase; does every prosodic unit have a head?; focus affects phrasing and it can be realized in multiple phonetic dimensions. How can we handle the optionality (optional dephrasing, deaccenting, pause, etc.) and cross-linguistic differences? --- and suggest future research directions.

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[3] Junko Ito & Armin Mester (UC Santa Cruz)

"Prosodic categories and recursion"

There are indications that the standard model of phrase-level phonological structure, and the underlying research program valuing the postulation of new descriptive categories over restrictiveness, has resulted in a hierarchy providing too many universal categories, but still too little structure in crucial respects. This talk will explore an alternative conception which makes essential use of recursive structure in prosody, and develop a new picture of the phrasal structure of Japanese, with a critical reexamination of evidence and arguments encountered in earlier work.

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[Discussion 1] Kenneth de Jong (Indiana University)

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[4] Yuki Hirose (University of Tokyo) & Yoshihisa Kitagawa (Indiana University)

"Production and perception of Prosody-Scope Correlation in Wh-interrogatives"

Report of psycholinguistic experiments which examine the role of prosody (and pragmatics) in the scope interpretation of Wh-interrogatives in Japanese.

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[5] Jennifer Smith (University of North Carolina)

"Accent deletion and phrase formation in Fukuoka Japanese WH constructions"

My talk will present empirical results to evaluate the claim that Fukuoka Japanese shows deletion of accents in the span between a WH element and its associated COMP, and then discuss the implications of that pattern for various approaches to the prosody-syntax interface.

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[6] Yosuke Igarashi (National Institute for Japanese Language) & Yoshihisa Kitagawa (Indiana University)

"Post-focal Monotony"

Pursuit of a general approach to characterize Wh-focus prosody in various different dialects in Japanese, which exhibit seemingly distinct surface intonation contours.

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[7] Norvin Richards (MIT)

"Beyond Strength and Weakness: wh-prosody and wh-syntax"

I try to develop a theory that predicts the distribution of overt and covert wh-movement. I propose a universal condition on the prosody of wh-questions, requiring wh-phrases and the complementizers with which they are associated to be separated by as few prosodic boundaries (of a certain type) as possible. For some languages, this universal requirement can be met by adjusting the prosody of the sentence directly; for others, the wh-phrase must be moved closer to the relevant complementizer to satisfy the general requirement. I try to show that the behavior of individual languages is predictable from independently observable properties of their prosodic systems.

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[Discussion 2] Haruo Kubozono

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[8] Caroline Féry and Shinichiro Ishihara (University of Potsdam)

"Syntactic Prosodic Realization of Information Structure in German, Japanese and Hungarian"

Comparison of the wide- and narrow-focus realizations will be made using sentences with a subject and a verb as well as those with an object and a verb in three languages (German, Japanese, and Hungarian). The corss-linguistic differences are discussed in relation to the syntactic and/or prosodic method to express information structure used in these languages.

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[9] Satoshi Tomioka (University of Delaware)

"Grammar of Anti-Exhaustivity"

In this talk, I demonstrate how the anti-exhaustivity associated with the Japanese contrastive topic is derived.

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[10] Sachie Kotani (University of Delaware)

"Bracketing paradoxes with Japanese focus particles"

This paper is about focus ambiguity of Japanese focus particles such as –sae ‘even’. Following Embick and Noyer (2001), I will propose an analysis based on the morphological movement, Morphological Merger, which affects the surface form of derivations, but not LF interpretation.

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[11] Yu-Yin Hsu (Indiana University)

"Internal Topic and Focus in Chinese: on the So-called Verb-duplicated Construction"

In this work, I argue that Topic and Focus in Chinese can be licensed sentence internally by two distinct functional heads in a fixed order, viz. sentence internal Topic must precede the internal Focus, not vice versa. I show that the so-called verb-duplicated phenomenon in Chinese can be explained straightforwardly under the proposed analysis. This study then demonstrate that the long lasting dispute over the “Topic vs. Focus ambiguity” of preverbal phrases in Chinese comes from the failure to differentiate distinct licensing positions of internal Topic and internal Focus. The present study in turn suggests that Rizzi’s (1997) “fine structure of the left periphery” can be adopted in analyzing the lower INFL domain, with slight adjustments made for Chinese data.

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[Discussion 3] Leslie Gabriele (Indiana University)

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[12] Robert Kluender (UC San Diego)

"How the brain processes syntactic and referential dependencies in English and Korean"

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[13] Kenji Yoshida & Yoshihisa Kitagawa (Indiana University)

"A Statistical Analysis of Accentability Judgments"

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[Discussion 4] Shinichiro Ishihara

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