Critical Language Scholarship (and information session)

Get immersive language training in less commonly taught languages through a Critical Language Scholarship (CLS) for summer 2016. Scholarships are available at multiple language levels and, in past years, fully-funded programs have been offered for U.S. undergraduate and graduate students in:

  • Azerbaijani, Bangla/Bengali, Hindi, Indonesian, Korean, Punjabi, Turkish, and Urdu: Beginning, advanced beginning, intermediate and advanced levels;
  • Arabic and Persian: Advanced beginning, intermediate and advanced levels;
  • Chinese, Japanese, and Russian: Intermediate and advanced levels.
  • Swahili will be offered for the first time in 2016.

National deadline will be mid-November.

Info session and workshop (with snacks):  Monday Oct. 5th from 5:30–7:00pm in Room 108 of the Hutton Honors College

Event hosted by: CLS alumna, Rebecca Mueller, and CLS campus representative Paul Fogleman

No RSVP necessary.

Direct inquiries to:

White House Fellows Program (Deadline 11/2)

 “In the 50 years since its founding, the White House Fellows Program has helped prove that those who love their country can change it. Our Nation needs your drive and talent, and we hope you consider applying to the program.”

– President Obama and Mrs. Obama –


Fifty years ago, President Lyndon B. Johnson established the President’s Commission on White House Fellowships and over the course of nine presidential administrations the nonpartisan White House Fellows program has become the nation’s premier fellowship for public service and leadership. The program’s mission is to expose Fellows to first-hand, high-level experience in the Federal government. The program consists of a full-time work placement in the offices of Cabinet Secretaries, senior White House staff, and other high-ranking Administration officials. During a year in Washington, DC, Fellows also participate in a robust education program designed to provide a behind-the-scenes look into the inner workings of the Federal government. It is an extraordinary year that yields a lifetime of rewards. Learn more about the White House Fellows program here.


Please mark your calendars for November 2, 2015 – the date that the 2016-2017 application will be LIVE!


Each fall, we are honored to welcome a new class of White House Fellows and accelerate our efforts to recruit applicants for the next class.  We invite you and/or your organization to join in our efforts and know that your support will allow us to reach remarkable leaders all over the country.  Here are 5 Easy Things You Can Do to help us recruit Fellows:


1.       Engage One-on-One. Identify exceptional individuals who could become White House Fellows and encourage them to apply.

2.       Send an Email. Please share information about the White House Fellows program to your professional and social networks.

3.       Utilize Social Media. Post messages promoting the program to Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, etc. using #WHFellows #BecomeaWHF

4.       Sponsor an Event. Please consider hosting an informational session, panel, or reception to present the program; to the extent possible, White House Fellows program staff will lend support and provide background materials.

5.       Leverage Earned Media. As a thought leader in your community, we invite you to submit op-eds, contribute to news stories, and/or author blog posts to share your experiences with the White House Fellows program.

Thank you for your help.  Please let us know if you have questions.  We know that your support will allow the White House Fellows program to stay strong for another 50 years!

More info:

Jennifer Yeager Kaplan, Director

President’s Commission on White House Fellowships

main: 202-395-4522 | direct: 202-395-7474

mobile: 202-725-5752

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IU Preparing Future Faculty Teaching Fellowship (PFFT) (deadline 10/9)


Provides the opportunity to teach for an entire academic year at Butler University or one of the Indiana University branch campuses: o IUPUI (Indianapolis) o IUPU Columbus o IU East (Richmond) o IPFW (Fort Wayne) o IU Kokomo o IU Northwest (Gary) o IU South Bend o IU Southeast (New Albany)

Stipend: $10,000 from the University Graduate School, plus $2,000 to cover moving expenses if the fellow is required to relocate to the area of the host campus. Host campuses pay an additional teaching salary to fellows (minimum of $6,000 for the academic year).

• Required residency in the host campus community at least part of each week during the fellowship year. Assistance in finding affordable living accommodations is provided by the host campus. Relocation is optional if teaching at IUPUI, IUPU Columbus, or Butler University.

• IU student academic appointee health insurance, provided by the University Graduate School.

• Teaching load: Two courses per semester.

• Faculty mentor at the host campus.

• Participation in faculty life at the host campus.

• Required three-day intensive FACET Institute workshop on teaching in different academic environments. The workshop is held off-campus in the summer.

• Please note: This fellowship does not carry a fee remission. Participants are expected to be eligible to register in G901 or equivalent research credit.



Advanced standing in a doctoral or M.F.A. program: doctoral students must have their Nomination to Candidacy (NTC) form approved by the University Graduate School prior to the application deadline. Minimum of one year of classroom teaching experience as an Associate Instructor. Completion of a pedagogy course of at least one semester in length. Alternatively, an applicant may complete GRAD-G700, Excellence in Teaching; an intensive pedagogy course offered by the University Graduate School, during the summer session prior to the fellowship year.

More info here

Grants-in-Aid of Jewish Studies Research and Fellowships

The Robert A. and Sandra S. Borns Jewish Studies Program
Indiana University announces

Grants-in-Aid of Jewish Studies Research and Fellowships for
Current Graduate Students

Application Deadline: Friday, March 4, 2016

Current Indiana University Bloomington graduate students working on topics of relevance to Jewish
Studies are invited to apply for The Robert A. and Sandra S. Borns Jewish Studies Program
grants-in-aid of research. These grants can be used either to provide graduate student support
(i.e.: to defray the costs of summer language study, travel, living expenses while conducting
thesis and dissertation research and/or thesis and dissertation writing, photocopying, or other
research expenses).

Preference will be given to Jewish Studies master’s degree students and doctoral minors. Graduate
students interested in applying for funding to attend a conference should apply for Jewish Studies
conference funding: (

Students must submit a grants-in-aid proposal stating when the funding is needed (Summer 2016
and/or Fall 2016 and/or Spring 2017),
and if you have applied for other funding.

Please include budget, and letter of reference in Word to by
Friday, March 4, 2016.

For more information about the Jewish Studies doctoral minor, see:
or contact Professor Sarah Imhoff

ACLS African Humanities Program

Fellowship Details

  • Applicants must be nationals and residents of a country in sub-Saharan Africa, with a current affiliation at an institution in Ghana, Nigeria, South Africa, Tanzania, or Uganda.
  • Funding is available for dissertation completion and forpostdoctoral research and writing.
  • Applicants for Dissertation-Completion Fellowships should be in the final year of writing the dissertation at a university in Ghana, Nigeria, Tanzania, or Uganda.
  • Dissertation-Completion Fellowships are not available in South Africa.
  • Applicants for Early Career Postdoctoral Fellowships must be working in Ghana, Nigeria, South Africa, Tanzania, or Uganda and must have completed the PhD no more than eight years ago.
  • Projects must be in the humanities and must be carried out in sub-Saharan Africa. AHP fellowships may not be used for travel outside the continent.
  • Completed applications must be submitted byNovember 2, 2015.
  • Applications must be submitted by email to

The African Humanities Program (AHP) seeks to reinvigorate the humanities in Africa through fellowship competitions and related activities in Ghana, Nigeria, South Africa, Tanzania, and Uganda. In partnership with the Carnegie Corporation of New York, which has generously provided funding, AHP offers African scholars an integrated set of opportunities to develop individual capacities and to promote formation of scholarly networks. The African Humanities Program supports the Carnegie Corporation’s efforts to develop and retain African academics at universities in Africa.

Goals of the African Humanities Program

  • to encourage and enable the production of new knowledge and new directions for research
  • to strengthen the capacity of early career researchers and faculty at African universities
  • to build the field of humanities by establishing networks for scholarly communication across Africa and with Africanists worldwide.

Fellowship stipends allow recipients an academic year free from teaching and other duties for completion of the PhD dissertation, for revising the dissertation for publication, or for the first major research project after the PhD. Fellows are also eligible for additional benefits such as residential stays for writing, manuscript development workshops, and publication support.

Each Fellow may request a residential stay at an African institute for advanced study. Residencies have proved to be extremely popular and productive, granting Fellows time and space to concentrate on writing. Because residencies must be taken at an institute outside the home country, they foster international communication. Currently AHP Fellows may take residencies at six institutes from South Africa to Senegal, Ghana to Tanzania.

Fellows are invited to submit their manuscripts to the AHP Publications series, a collaboration with UNISA Press in Pretoria, South Africa. The rigorous development and peer-review process of AHP Publications is overseen by the two series co-editors, Kwesi Yankah, Central University College, Ghana, and Frederick Hendricks, Rhodes University, South Africa.

Fellows may apply to attend a Manuscript-Development Workshop to discuss their manuscripts with AHP mentors and other Fellows in a weeklong, intensive retreat. Many authors use these discussions to guide their final revisions before submitting manuscripts for publication.

AHP also partners with the African Studies Association every year to bring select AHP Fellows to the ASA Annual Meeting as ASA Presidential Fellows.

News and views of the AHP community are shared on a Facebook page.

For further details on eligibility, submission of applications, and selection criteria, see 2015-16 Competition Announcement (PDF). Instructions and Application material are now available.


more info here

Mellon Fellowships for Dissertation Research in Original Sources (deadline 11/20)

About the Program

The Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) is pleased to offer fellowships generously funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for dissertation research in the humanities or related social sciences in original sources.

The program offers about fifteen competitively awarded fellowships a year in amounts up to $25,000. Each provides a stipend of $2,000 per month for periods ranging from 9-12 months. Each fellow receives an additional $1,000 upon participating in a symposium on research in original sources and submitting a report acceptable to CLIR on the research experience.

The purposes of this fellowship program are to:

  • help junior scholars in the humanities and related social science fields gain skill and creativity in developing knowledge from original sources;
  • enable dissertation writers to do research wherever relevant sources may be, rather than just where financial support is available;
  • encourage more extensive and innovative uses of original sources in libraries, archives, museums, historical societies, and related repositories in the U.S. and abroad; and
  • provide insight from the viewpoint of doctoral candidates into how scholarly resources can be developed for access most helpfully in the future.

Selection Criteria

A special committee of scholars in the humanities, archivists, and special-collections librarians will select fellowship recipients.

The committee aims to select representatives from different fields of the humanities and related social sciencesconsistent with quality in the research proposals. The committee will assess quality with reference to the following criteria:

  • originality and creativity of the research proposal;
  • importance of the proposed dissertation to the applicant’s field;
  • appropriateness of the primary-source collection(s) and institutions in which the applicant proposes to do research;
  • competence of the applicant for proposed research as indicated by references, transcripts, language skills, research experience, and other academic achievements; and
  • prospects for completing specified research within the time projected and funds awarded (not all dissertation work need necessarily be done within the fellowship period).

The committee will give preference to sound non-traditional projects in all eligible fields such as those that—

  • use sources in innovative, creative ways;
  • use newly available or little studied sources;
  • make interdisciplinary use of sources; and/or
  • use sources in repositories that cannot, themselves, provide financial assistance to researchers.

Fellows may propose to work in more than one repository during the fellowship period, including repositories abroad. Preference is given to applicants working away from their home institutions. The selection committee will assess the applicant’s need for working in multiple repositories, working abroad, or both.

In the administration and awarding of fellowships, neither CLIR nor the selection committee discriminates on the basis of age, gender, race, ethnicity, physical disability, marital status, sexual orientation, religion, or political affiliation.

For questions regarding this program, please contact us by e-mail at

Additional Information




More info here

Luce/ACLS Dissertation Fellowships in American Art (deadline 10/21)

Fellowship Details

  • Stipend: $25,000, plus up to $2,000 as a travel allowance
  • Tenure: one year beginning summer 2016
  • Completed applications must be submitted through the ACLS Online Fellowship Application system ( no later than 9 pm Eastern Daylight Time, October 21, 2015.
  • Notifications will be sent via email by late March 2016.

ACLS invites applications for the Henry Luce Foundation/ACLS Dissertation Fellowships in American Art designated for graduate students in any stage of PhD dissertation research or writing. Ten fellowships are available for a non-renewable, one-year term beginning between June and September 2016 for the 2016-17 academic year. The fellowships may be carried out in residence at the fellow’s home institution, abroad, or at another appropriate site for the research. The fellowships may not be used to defray tuition costs or be held concurrently with any other major fellowship or grant.

This program is made possible by funding from the Henry Luce Foundation.


Applicants must:

  • be a PhD candidate in a department of art history in the United States. A student with an appropriate project whose degree will be granted by another department is eligible only if the principal dissertation advisor is in a department of art history. (Students preparing theses for the Master of Fine Arts degree are not eligible.)
  • have a dissertation focused on a topic in the history of the visual arts of the United States. Although the topic may be historically and/or theoretically grounded, attention to the art object and/or image should be foremost. Projects must be object-oriented and use art-historical or visual studies approaches; proposals whose emphases are predominantly socio-historical will not be considered.
  • have completed all requirements for the PhD except the dissertation before beginning fellowship tenure.
  • have not previously applied for this fellowship more than once.
  • be a US citizen or permanent resident.

Application Requirements

Applications must include:

  • Completed application form
  • Proposal (no more than five pages, double spaced, in Times New Roman 11-point font)
  • Bibliography (no more than two pages)
  • Illustrations (no more than three pages) [optional]
  • Publications list (no more than two pages) [optional]
  • Two reference letters
  • A statement from the applicant’s institution (preferably from the applicant’s department chair or dean). The provided form asks the institutional representative to confirm that the applicant is a doctoral candidate in good standing and that all requirements for the PhD except the dissertation will be completed by the beginning of fellowship tenure. Further, the institutional representative should confirm that 1) the normal academic year tuition payments for the awardee will be waived or will be provided by the awardee’s university, and that (2) the university will continue to provide the student with appropriate access to its research resources and facilities.

Note that transcripts are not required.

Evaluation Criteria

Scholars asked to review applications in this program are instructed to use the following three criteria:

  1. The quality of the proposal with regard to its methodology, scope, theoretical framework, and grounding in the relevant scholarly literature.
  2. The potential of the project to advance the field of study in art history, both generally and in the specific field(s) it engages.
  3. The scholarly record and career trajectory of the applicant.

More info:

Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships (deadline 10/21)

Fellowship Details

  • Stipend: $30,000, plus funds for research costs of up to $3,000 and for university fees of up to $5,000
  • Tenure: one year beginning summer 2016
  • Completed applications must be submitted through the ACLS Online Fellowship Application system ( no later than 9 pm Eastern Daylight Time, October 21, 2015.
  • Notifications will be sent via email in late March 2016.

ACLS invites applications for the tenth annual competition for theMellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships, which support a year of research and writing to help advanced graduate students in the humanities and related social sciences in the last year of PhD dissertation writing. The program encourages timely completion of the PhD. Applicants must be prepared to complete their dissertations within the period of their fellowship tenure and no later than August 31, 2017. A grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation supports this program.

ACLS will award 65 fellowships in this competition for a one-year term beginning between June and September 2016 for the 2016-17 academic year. The fellowship tenure may be carried out in residence at the fellow’s home institution, abroad, or at another appropriate site for the research. These fellowships may not be held concurrently with any other fellowship or grant.

The total award of up to $38,000 includes a stipend plus additional funds for university fees and research support. In addition to the monetary support that the fellowship offers, Dissertation Completion Fellows are able to apply to participate in a seminar on preparing for the academic job market.  The seminar takes place over three days in the fall of the fellowship year.


  • The program is open to PhD candidates in a humanities or social science department in the United States. (1)
  • Applicants must have completed all requirements for the PhD except the dissertation (obtained ABD status) by the application deadline.
  • The program is restricted to graduate students who, at the time of application, have progressed no further than the sixth year of the degree program.  (This includes time for a master’s degree obtained en route to the PhD.) (2)
  • Graduate students who currently hold or have previously held a dissertation completion fellowship are not eligible for the Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship.
  • Unsuccessful applicants may reapply to this program only once.

Application Requirements

Applications must be submitted online and must include:

  • Completed application form
  • Proposal (no more than five pages, double spaced, in Times New Roman 11-point font
  • One-page timeline for the expected completion of dissertation writing and defense
  • Up to three additional pages of images, musical scores, or other similar supporting non-text materials [optional]
  • Bibliography (no more than two pages)
  • Completed chapter of the dissertation (that is neither the introduction, nor the conclusion, nor the literature review) of not more than 25 double-spaced pages, in Times New Roman 11-point font, or a representative 25-page excerpt from a longer chapter. The chapter must be in English, though citations may be in other languages (with translations provided).
  • Two reference letters
  • A statement from the applicant’s institution (preferably from the applicant’s department chair or dean). The provided form asks the institutional representative to (1) attest to the viability of the proposed timeline for completion; (2) stipulate that, in the event of an award, the university will not charge the student tuition or fees beyond a limit of $5,000 and will provide for any additional costs; and (3) pledge that if an ACLS award is made, the university will not provide the applicant with any subsequent aid. The person submitting the statement cannot be one of the reference letter writers.

Note that transcripts are not required.

Evalutation Criteria

Scholars asked to review applications in this program are instructed to use the following four criteria:

  1. The potential of the project to advance the field of study in which it is proposed and make an original and significant contribution to knowledge.
  2. The quality of the proposal with regard to its methodology, scope, theoretical framework, and grounding in the relevant scholarly literature.
  3. The feasibility of the project and the likelihood that the applicant will execute the work within the proposed timeframe.
  4. The scholarly record and career trajectory of the applicant.
  1. The Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship program does not accept applications from students receiving a PhD in the following disciplines: business, library and information sciences, public administration, public policy, education, clinical or counseling psychology, law, social work, social welfare, public health, filmmaking, or creative or performing arts. Students completing master’s degrees are not eligible, even if they are the terminal degree in the field. Back to text.
  2. In special circumstances an applicant and his or her advisor may petition to have seventh-year application considered. Such applicants must present a compelling case for eligibility. Back to text.

More info here.

East-West Center (University of Hawaii) announces 2015 funding opportunities for graduate students

The East-West Center’s student programs, carried out in cooperation with the University of Hawai‘i (UH), are designed to foster a shared sense of community and develop the leadership skills and regional literacy needed for regional cooperation and community building among nations. The thread of cooperative study runs through all of the Center’s programs, whether conducted on campus or off, in the classroom or in the field, for students or for professionals. At the Center, learning is viewed as a collaborative process in which each person contributes knowledge, experience, and multi-cultural perspectives to benefit all participants. The Center recognizes the importance of establishing a basis for the comfortable exchange of ideas by building an environment of openness, trust, and shared community.

More info here.

Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowships Application Open (deadline 11/15)

Application deadline November 15, 2015, 11:59 p.m. EST


The Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowships are designed to encourage original and significant study of ethical or religious values in all fields of the humanities and social sciences, and particularly to help Ph.D. candidates in these fields complete their dissertation work in a timely manner. In addition to topics in religious studies or in ethics (philosophical or religious), dissertations appropriate to the Newcombe Fellowship competition might explore the ethical implications of foreign policy, the values influencing political decisions, the moral codes of other cultures, and religious or ethical issues reflected in history or literature.

Since the first round of competition in 1981, more than 1,100 Newcombe Fellows have been named. Fellows from early years of the program are now senior faculty members at major research universities and selective liberal arts colleges, curators and directors at significant scholarly archives, and leaders and policymakers at nonprofit organizations and in cabinet-level government agencies. In the past decade, national honors such as the MacArthur Fellowship, Pulitzer Prize in History, the Guggenheim Fellowship, and election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences have been accorded to more than a dozen Newcombe Fellows—a number that will continue to grow as more and more Fellows enter the most productive phases of their careers.


The Newcombe Fellowships are provided to Ph.D. candidates at American institutions located in the United States who will complete their dissertations during the academic year 2016-2017. In the current Newcombe competition, at least 22 non-renewable Fellowships of $25,000 will be awarded for 12 months of full-time dissertation writing; in addition, Fellows’ graduate schools will be asked to waive tuition and/or remit some portion of their fees. Successful candidates will be notified, and the public announcement of new Fellows made, in spring 2016.

About the Charlotte W. Newcombe Foundation

The Woodrow Wilson Foundation administers the Newcombe Fellowship competition at the request of and in consultation with the Charlotte W. Newcombe Foundation, a private foundation created under the will of Philadelphia philanthropist Mrs. Newcombe, who died in 1979. In addition to the Newcombe Dissertation Fellowships, the Newcombe Foundation funds three college scholarship programs: for students with disabilities, for returning women students, and by establishing and augmenting Special Scholarship Endowment funds at selected colleges and universities, helping students complete degrees in higher education.


Please review the information on the following pages:

You may also view a flyer, the selection committee members, and Fellows from the most recent competition: