Innovation at IU: Pervasive Technology Institute (PTI)

As a student at IU, I have been given access to one of the finest IT environments in the whole nation. UITS (University Information Technology Services) services and support have been awesome from day one, since I first got my umail account. One of the primary functions of UITS is to provide IT support to all IU students, faculty, and staff. For more information, please visit its website. But in this blog post, my focus is to introduce a unique jewel IU is extremely proud to own, and that is the Pervasive Technology Institute (PTI).

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IT Training

Learning computer applications, different programs, programming languages, and slick computer skills is important to most if not all students irrespective of academic disciplines. If you are wondering about honing your programming skills or if you are a beginner who wants to learn a spreadsheet application (e.g. Microsoft excel), IT Training is an amazing resource for you.

IT Training has offices both on IU and on IUPUI campuses. The department offers numerous instructor-led computing workshops catering to a range of needs. The spring semester schedule is now available. Continue reading

Conferences in One’s Minor

What often comes to mind when the topic of conferences come up?  Preparing an abstract/paper/poster to present in one’s major and figuring out how to pay for the trip are two common item.  Well, when I was in undergrad, I did something a little different:  I attended several conferences in my minor, Computer Science.

In my last year of undergrad, I became part of an all-female CS research group funded by a CREU (Computing Research Experience for Undergraduates) grant.  Looong story how I got involved.  The grant required that members of the group present their research at least two computing conferences.  I wound up going to three.  Let’s focus on the last one, Grace Hopper’s Women in Computing.

At this point in time, everyone in the research group had graduated.  Robyn was in the midst of job training, Jaelle had begun her position as tech liaison, and I started grad school two months prior.  Robyn was unable to go, but Jaelle and I were able to meet up again in Atlanta, Georgia.  And guess what?  We both encountered women in physics or involved in physics-related projects at this computing conference.  Computing and physics often go hand-in-hand and that was understood here.  Unlike the undergraduate career fair in SD, which catered to engineers only and didn’t know what to do with a physics student, the recruiters here looked at physics students with a serious interest.

So go ahead.  Go to a conference in your minor.  You’ll never know what you’ll find.