Preparing Future Faculty Conference – 2016

When: February 12th, 8:30am – 5:00pm
Registration: FREE! “Open to all IU graduate students. But to participate in the complimentary lunch, you must register by Monday, February 8th, 2016.”

PFFC is an amazing opportunity for networking, learning about job market, interacting with faculty, and last but not least for great food.

This is one of the professional development opportunities, about which you can put a one-liner on your CV. But it’s also a nice opportunity to set new goals for yourself for the 2016 year, things you learn from this one day conference will help you navigate your grad school with little more ease. Last year I wrote at some length about why this particular conference is important.

Take this opportunity, and see you on 12th!

Emerging Researchers National (ERN) Conference in STEM (Washington, DC. 2015)

Last month, I got an amazing opportunity to interact with some of the brightest researchers across the United States. I was part of the IU-team (Dr. Yolanda Treviño (the Assistant Vice President for Strategy, Planning, and Assessment), Dr. Garfield Warren (physics), Dr. Sara Skrabalak (chemistry) and myself) that attended the 5th annual Emerging Researchers National (ERN) Conference in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) held in Washington, DC on February 19-21.

About 1000 undergraduate and graduate students presented their research at the ERN conference. Continue reading

Preparing Future Faculty Conference

Graduate studies at IU bring opportunities not only for academic training, but also for professional development and developing leadership skills. Obtaining good grades and doing great research indeed are cornerstones for one’s successful career. But adding leadership qualities to one’s toolkit would even exceed the success attained by grades and research. Why? Because leadership qualities let you make a difference in lives of many, not just yours. Continue reading

Please don’t pick me, please don’t pick me

from blog.k12.com

from blog.k12.com

At the beginning of every semester in the social psych area, we set up the schedule for our area colloquium. Once we cover who all the outside speakers are, and when they’ll be coming, there’s the critical moment where the faculty member in charge says, “which graduate students would like to present?” There’s always the awkward moment (or few moments) of looking around, avoiding everyone’s glances, and then eventually enough people sign up. What’s funny is that this same scene plays out every semester! It’s nerve-wracking to get up in front of all the faculty and graduate students in the area and talk about your own research for an hour (or longer…), but it’s a great opportunity to practice presentation style and skills, as well as the best way to communicate the novelty and excitement of your own research to others.

So, if you have a chance to present at anything, a conference poster session, an IU research symposium, or your departmental colloquium, rip off the Band-Aid (so to speak) and volunteer yourself. You may be nervous, but if you prepare for it ahead of time, you’ll be just fine!

Graduate Student Emissaries at Work

Along with blogging, giving student tours and being successful Graduate Students the Emissaries for Graduate Student Diversity also give presentations. Three emissaries gave a presentation on “graduate school preparedness” at the Hudson and Holland Scholars Program LEAD Conference on Saturday, February 2, 2013 at the Bloomington Convention Center.

Carl D., Zelideh M-H., and Alfonse P presented two workshops on “Graduate School Preparedness” at the Hudson and Holland Scholars Program LEAD Conference on Saturday, February 2, 2013 at the Bloomington Convention Center.

~ Photo taken by David N.

Future Faculty Conference

This past week I attended a future faculty conference at Virginia Tech. It was lots of fun. I got to meet other grad students and post docs from around the nation. I figured I share the pictures with you all. Check it out! If you are able to participate in future faculty programs I’d strongly encourage it, IU has one in the spring click here for more info.

Faculty mentors are critical to success in grad school

Mentorship is important to being successful in all that we do.  It is no different in graduate school.  It is important to find good and compatible faculty mentors to help you succeed and progress through graduate school.  I have been very fortunate.  Both of my mentors have been very involved in my academic work and development to enter the professoriate.  I have been able to collaborate on scholarly research with my professors, and I have been introduced to academic and scholarly conferences through them also.  While attending a conference where I presented, my professor was very gracious to introduce me to other colleagues, get me involved in the association’s activities, and she helped me feel welcome. These activities and opportunities have helped me get closer to the professoriate, and I attribute it to my faculty mentors!

Conferences in One’s Minor

What often comes to mind when the topic of conferences come up?  Preparing an abstract/paper/poster to present in one’s major and figuring out how to pay for the trip are two common item.  Well, when I was in undergrad, I did something a little different:  I attended several conferences in my minor, Computer Science.

In my last year of undergrad, I became part of an all-female CS research group funded by a CREU (Computing Research Experience for Undergraduates) grant.  Looong story how I got involved.  The grant required that members of the group present their research at least two computing conferences.  I wound up going to three.  Let’s focus on the last one, Grace Hopper’s Women in Computing.

At this point in time, everyone in the research group had graduated.  Robyn was in the midst of job training, Jaelle had begun her position as tech liaison, and I started grad school two months prior.  Robyn was unable to go, but Jaelle and I were able to meet up again in Atlanta, Georgia.  And guess what?  We both encountered women in physics or involved in physics-related projects at this computing conference.  Computing and physics often go hand-in-hand and that was understood here.  Unlike the undergraduate career fair in SD, which catered to engineers only and didn’t know what to do with a physics student, the recruiters here looked at physics students with a serious interest.

So go ahead.  Go to a conference in your minor.  You’ll never know what you’ll find.

Recruiting while at academic conferences

As a alumnus and current student of Indiana University, I represent the university and the schools that I am affiliated with everyday and every interaction I have with others. Indiana University is a world-renowned institution that attracts quality and diverse scholars to study and research.

This semester, I plan to attend and present at two scholarly conferences: the Indiana Student Affairs Association Annual Conference in Indianapolis, Indiana, and the Education Law Association Annual Conference held in Hilton Head Island, South Carolina.  I will be presenting about the upcoming U.S. Supreme Court case Fisher v. University of Texas – Austin when the Justices will hear oral arguments in October.  Their decision in this case can change how universities and their admissions offices consider race and ethnicity as diversity in their admissions decisions, and thus, impact the make-up of our student body and the quality of our higher education.

      

While at these conferences, my interactions with fellow colleagues and prospective students will be to introduce them to Indiana University.  IU is a place that embraces diverse research and viewpoints.  As such, I am proud to be representing IU and continually recruit and introduce others to IU.

Recruiting at academic conferences isn’t akin to sales.  I am not there to pitch a sales message, but I am there to build life-long relationships, friendships, and academic camaraderie.  The name of the game isn’t competition, but collaboration.

Welcome to IU!  I look forward to meeting you and showing you how IU can help you succeed in your academic career.