Deciding on attending graduate school?

If you are a college junior or a senior wondering whether to go to grad school or not, hopefully this might help. However, this is valid more generally. It is imperative for most of you to be under pressure by your peers, family and the whole world itself. People start comparing with friends and other students to see if they can stay ahead in a so called ‘great competition’. ‘They’ say the competition is real. You should be on top of the world. So a natural advice would be to find your ‘passion’ and follow in the footsteps of your successful alumni/role model/idol in that field. It seems like the world expects you to figure it out all by yourself very quickly. That is not how humans and world work. As far as my wisdom goes, every individual is different and everyone has his/her own way of going about things in life. One may like to take more pressure, one might like to live life in a very leisure way. One might like to spend more time away from work.

Did you ever really spend time figuring out who exactly you are in life? Did you ever wonder why identical twins who look exactly same and brought up in exactly same environment grow up to be two very different individuals?

It might sound crazy to you but trust me you will feel a lot better after reading and trying this. I call this the process of ‘self-discovery’ and it is neither easy nor quick. There is nothing called ‘the moment of truth’ or ‘the judgement day’. It will not happen in a day, week, or even in a month. It takes years to figure out who you are. Then the answers to questions such as what do you want in life and how to go about achieving it, will be consequently answered. There are thousands of books, blogs, videos that talk about this process of self-discovery. For example, ‘they’ say that you need to be spiritual, religious or renounce the worldly pleasures to see who you really are. ‘They’ may be right. While I am not judging their ways, I found something really helpful, which might even be a shortcut in this process.

First of all – make up your mind and convince yourself that it is worth spending time to do this. Now, allocate a solid weekend. Go to a place alone where there is no Wi-Fi, people, etc. (you get the idea – A serene place, for example a lake, a beach, or similar). Put your phone in silent mode and start watching the nature for some time so that you should lose track of time. Don’t listen to any music. Pay utmost detail to the environment around you. Watch and listen carefully to each and everything around you. Just be present as much as you can. A thousand things may pass through your mind while doing so, just ignore them and try to focus on the environment. Practice observing the nature for at least half an hour. I know it is very hard to do so. But take a leap of faith! This practice helps you get on top of all the noise in your mind.

Now start thinking about some of the best moments of your life. Start visualizing those memories and focus on moments where you were this mindful while doing something.

Did you ever really extend/polish/overdo any projects related to your major both in and out of academics?

Do you love/enjoy reading more and more about any news, articles, books (both fiction and non-fiction) related to your major?

Were you that mindful while listening to your professors in the class?

Did you ever feel ‘mind-blown’ while listening to a lecture or a talk related to your major?

Did you ever feel the urge to learn more about a specific chapter/lesson/project?

Did you feel the urge to ask more and more questions which appear to be more abstract in nature but about the field in general?

Do you like to discuss about science/your related major more often when you look back at your most recent conversations with people?

If these questions struck a chord with you, then you might want to attend a grad school. Otherwise, you might want to reconsider your options.

The exercise I just talked about gives you a sense of direction and not even close to a decision. To come to a conclusion you need to do a lot of research and talk to a lot of people (I mean really!). I received some of the best advice from my professors and other alums who were pursuing graduate studies.

  • A lake in Bloomington, IN

Monroe Lake in Bloomington, IN


Reaffirming Experiences


There are days where a graduate program will seem long. With papers to write, articles to read, and the ever looming thesis or job search ahead, it can often feel like your world is a long series of checklists and “ok what’s next.” But, there will also be things that happen throughout your time in the program that will be completely unexpected, wonderful, and remind you of why you’re there.

One such moment happened to me this last week. As a part of the Higher Education and Student Affairs program, masters students are required to have a position on campus working in student affairs to connect and practice those responsible skills learned in class in a professional setting. I have the opportunity to work as a Graduate Supervisor for Residential Programs and Services (RPS). Within this position, I get to work with 20 incredible undergraduate student leaders who serve as Resident Assistants (RAs) within the Residence Hall. One particular RA and I had the opportunity to discuss how they worked with their floor during a difficult situation.

Throughout this last week, many members of the floor community had reported to the RA that they had been woken up at all hours of the morning by their neighbors or other members of the floor being loud. With this happening, it has been difficult for anyone to get a full nights sleep, which has been impacting their ability to attend class, study, and be successful overall in their college experience. In an attempt to discuss this issue with the floor, the RA scheduled a floor meeting early in the morning Continue reading