Albert-László Barabási
Department of Physics
University of Notre Dame

THE ARCHITECTURE OF COMPLEXITY: FROM THE CELL TO THE WORLD WIDE WEB AND FROM BUDAPEST TO INDIANA

Networks with complex topology describe systems as diverse as the cell, the World Wide Web or the society. The emergence of most networks is driven by self-organizing processes that are governed by simple but generic laws. The analysis of the metabolic and protein network of various organisms shows that cells and complex man-made networks, such as the Internet or the world wide web, share the same large-scale topology. I will show that the scale-free topology of these complex webs have important consequences on their robustness against failures and attacks, with implications on drug design, the Internet's ability to survive attacks and failures, and our ability to understand the functional role of genes in model organisms. I will also demonstrate how networks take us from Budapest to Indiana, with a number of prominent Hungarian contributions along the way.