Bibliography — How Students Learn to Think Like Historians

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  • Berti, Anna Emilia. “Children’s Understanding of the Concept of the State.” In Cognitive and Instructional Processes in History and the Social Sciences , edited by Mario Carretero and James F. Voss, 49-75. Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1994.

  • Blackey, Robert, ed. Perspectives on Teaching Innovations: Teaching to Think Historically . Washington, DC: American Historical Association, 1999

  • Britt, M. Anne, Charles A. Perfetti, Julie A. Van Dyke, and Gareth Gabrys. “The Sourcer’s Apprentice: A Tool for Document-Supported Instruction.” In Knowing, Teaching, and Learning History: National and International Perspectives , edited by Peter N. Stearns, Peter Seixas and Sam Wineburg, 437-70. New York: New York University Press, 2000.

  • Britt, M. Anne, Jean-François Rouet, Mara C. Georgi, and Charles A. Perfetti. “Learning from History Texts: From Causal Analysis to Argument Models.” In Teaching and Learning in History , edited by Gaea Leinhardt, Isabel L. Beck and Catherine Stainton, 47-84. Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1994.

  • Carretero, Mario, Liliana Jacott, Margarita Limón, Asunción Lopez-Manjón, and Jose A. León. “Historical Knowledge: Cognitive and Instructional Implications.” In Cognitive and Instructional Processes in History and the Social Sciences , edited by Mario Carretero and James F. Voss, 357-76. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1994.

  • Cooper, Hilary. “Historical Thinking and Cognitive Development in the Teaching of History.” In Teaching History , edited by Hilary Bourdillon, 101-21. London: Open University Press, 1994.

  • Cross, K. Patricia. “What Do We Know About Learning and How Do We Know It?” In American Association for Higher Education Conference on Higher Education . Atlanta, Georgia, 1998.

  • Culpin, Chris. “Making Progress in History.” In Teaching History , edited by Hilary Bourdillon, 126-52. London: Open University Press, 1994.

  • Curtis, Susheela, and Sue Bardwel. “Access to History.” In Teaching History , edited by Hilary Bourdillon, 169-86. London: Open University Press, 1994.

  • Davies, Peter, Janet Conneely, Rhys Davies, and Derek Lynch. “Imaginative Ideas for Teaching and Learning.” In The Practice of University History Teaching , edited by Alan Booth and Paul Hyland, 112-24. Manchester, U.K.: Manchester University Press, 2000.

  • Furnham, Adrian. “Young People’s Understanding of Politics and Economics.” In Cognitive and Instructional Processes in History and the Social Sciences , edited by Mario Carretero and James F. Voss, 17-47. Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1994.

  • Gardner, Howard. The Unschooled Mind: How Children Think and How Schools Should Teach . New York: Basic Books, 1995.

  • Halldén, Ola. “On the Paradox of Understanding History in an Educational Setting.” In Teaching and Learning in History , edited by Gaea Leinhardt, Isabel L. Beck and Catherine Stainton, 27-46. Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1994.

  • ———. “Constructing the Learning Task in History Instruction.” In Cognitive and Instructional Processes in History and the Social Sciences , edited by Mario Carretero and James F. Voss, 187-200. Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1994.

  • Gillespie, S., ed. Perspectives on Teaching Innovations: Teaching to Think Historically . Washington, D.C.: American Historial Association, 1999.

  • Kuhn, Deanna, Michael Weinstock, and Robin Flaton. “Historical Reasoning as Theory-Evidence Coordination.” In Cognitive and Instructional Processes in History and the Social Sciences , edited by Mario Carretero and James F. Voss, 377-401. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1994.

  • Lee, Peter, and Rosalyn Ashby. “Progression in Historical Understanding among Students Ages 7-14.” In Knowing, Teaching, and Learning History: National and International Perspectives , edited by Peter N. Stearns, Peter Seixas and Sam Wineburg, 199-222. New York: New York University Press, 2000.

  • Leinhardt, Gaea. “History: A Time to Be Mindful.” In Teaching and Learning in History , edited by Gaea Leinhardt, Isabel L. Beck and Catherine Stainton, 209-55. Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1994.

  • Leinhardt, Gaea, Isabel L. Beck, and Catherine Stainton. Teaching and Learning in History . Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1994.

  • Leinhardt, Gaea, Catherine Stainton, Salim M. Virji, and Elizabeth Odoroff. “Learning to Reason in History: Mindlessness to Mindfulness.” In Cognitive and Instructional Processes in History and the Social Sciences , edited by Mario Carretero and James F. Voss, 131-58. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1994.

  • McAleavy, Tony. “Meeting Pupils’ Learning Needs: Differentiation and Progression in the Teaching of History.” In Teaching History , edited by Hilary Bourdillon, 153-68. London: Open University Press, 1994.

  • McKeown, Margaret G., and Isabel L. Beck. “Making Sense of Accounts of History: Why Don’t and How They Might.” In Teaching and Learning in History , edited by Gaea Leinhardt, Isabel L. Beck and Catherine Stainton, 1-26. Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Earlbaum Associates, 1994.

  • Pace, David.“Decoding Historical Evidence,” in David Ludvigsson, ed., Enhancing Student Learning in History. Perspectives on University History Teaching (University of Uppsala, Sweden: Swedish Science Press, 2012), pp.49-62.

  • Perfetti, Charles A., M. Anne Britt, Jean-François Rouet, Mara C. Georgi, and Robert A. Mason. “How Students Use Texts to Learn and Reason about Historical Uncertainty.” In Cognitive and Instructional Processes in History and the Social Sciences , edited by Mario Carretero and James F. Voss, 257-83. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1994.

  • Schon, D. “The New Scholarship Requires a New Epistemology: Knowing in Action.” Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning 27 (1995): 27-34.

  • Seixas, Peter. “Mapping the Terrain of Historical Significance.” Social Education 61 (1997): 22-27.

  • _______. “Students’ Understanding of Historical Significance.” Theory and Research in Social Education 22 (1994): 281-304.

  • ———. “When Psychologists Discuss Historical Thinking: A Historian’s Perspective.” Education Psychologist 29, no. 2 (1994): 107*.

  • ———. “Confronting the Moral Frames of Popular Film: Young People Respond to Historical Relativism.” American Journal of Education 102 (1994): 261-85.

  • Torney-Purta, Judith. “Dimensions of Adolescents’ Reasoning about Political and Historical Issues: Ontological Switches, Developmental Processes, and Situated Learning.” In Cognitive and Instructional Processes in History and the Social Sciences , edited by Mario Carretero and James F. Voss, 103-22. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1994.

  • Voss, James F., Mario Carretero, Joel Kennet, and Laurie Ney Silfies. “The Collapse of the Soviet Union: A Case Study in Causal Reasoning.” In Cognitive and Instructional Processes in History and the Social Sciences , edited by Mario Carretero and James F. Voss, 403-29. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1994.

  • Wineburg, Sam. “The Cognitive Representation of Historical Texts.” In Teaching and Learning in History , edited by Gaea Leinhardt, Isabel L. Beck and Catherine Stainton, 85-135. Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1994.

  • Wineburg, Samuel S., and Janice Fournier. “Contextualized Thinking in History.” In Cognitive and Instructional Processes in History and the Social Sciences , edited by Mario Carretero and James F. Voss, 285-308. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1994.

  • Wineburg, Sam. “Reading Abraham Lincoln: An Expert/Expert Study in the Interpretation of Historical Texts.” Cognitive Science 22 (1999): 319-46.

  • ———. “Historical Thinking and Other Unnatural Acts.” Phi Delta Kappan 80 (1999): 488-99. www.pdkintl.org/kappan/kwin9903.htm

  • Boix-Mansilla, Veronica. “Historical Understanding: Beyond the Past and into the Present.” In Knowing, Teaching, and Learning History: National and International Perspectives , edited by Peter N. Stearns, Peter Seixas and Sam Wineburg, 390-418. New York: New York University Press, 2000.

  • Shemilt, Denis. “The Caliph’s Coin: The Currency of Narrative Frameworks in History Teaching.” In Knowing, Teaching, and Learning History: National and International Perspectives , edited by Peter N. Stearns, Peter Seixas and Sam Wineburg, 83-101. New York: New York University Press, 2000.

  • Stearns, Peter N. “Getting Specific about Training in Historical Analysis: A Case Study in World History.” In Knowing, Teaching, and Learning History: National and International Perspectives , edited by Peter N. Stearns, Peter Seixas and Sam Wineburg, 419-36. New York: New York University Press, 2000.

  • Stearns, Peter N., Peter Seixas, and Sam Wineburg, eds. Knowing, Teaching, and Learning History: National and International Perspectives . New York: New York University Press, 2000.

  • Voss, James F., and Jennifer Wiley. “A Case Study of Developing Historical Understanding via Instruction: The Importance of Integrating Text Components and Constructing Arguments.” In Knowing, Teaching, and Learning History: National and International Perspectives , edited by Peter N. Stearns, Peter Seixas and Sam Wineburg, 375-89. New York: New York University Press, 2000.

  • Wertsch, James V. “Is It Possible to Teach Beliefs, as Well as Knowledge about History?” In Knowing, Teaching, and Learning History: National and International Perspectives , edited by Peter N. Stearns, Peter Seixas and Sam Wineburg, 38-50. New York: New York University Press, 2000.

  • Wineburg, Sam. “Making Historical Sense.” In Knowing, Teaching, and Learning History: National and International Perspectives , edited by Peter N. Stearns, Peter Seixas and Sam Wineburg, 306-25. New York: New York University Press, 2000.

  • Wilson, Suzanne M. “Review of History Teaching.” In Handbook of Research on Teaching , edited by Virginia Richardson, 527-65. New York: *, 2001.

  • Wineburg, Sam. Historical Thinking and Other Unnatural Acts: Charting the Future of Teaching the Past . Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press, 2001.

  • Grim, Valerie, David Pace, and Leah Shopkow. “Learning to Use Evidence in the Study of History.” In Decoding the Disciplines: Helping Students Learn Disciplinary Ways of Thinking in New Directions in Teaching and Learning , edited by David Pace and Joan Middendorf, 57-65. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2004.

  • Lee, Peter. “Understanding History.” In Theorizing Historical Consciousness , edited by Peter Seixas, 129-55. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2004.

  • Pace, David. “Decoding the Reading of History: An Example of the Process.” In Decoding the Disciplines: Helping Students Learn Disciplinary Ways of Thinking in New Directions in Teaching and Learning , edited by David Pace and Joan Middendorf, 13-21. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2004.

  • Schlegel, Whitney M., and David Pace. “Using Collaborative Learning Teams to Decode Discipliens: Physiology and History.” In Decoding the Disciplines: Helping Students Learn Disciplinary Ways of Thinking in New Directions in Teaching and Learning , edited by David Pace and Joan Middendorf, 75-84. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2004.

  • Seixas, Peter, ed. Theorizing Historical Consciousness . Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2004.

  • Simon, Roger I. “The Pedagogical Insistence of Public Memory.” In Theorizing Historical Consciousness , edited by Peter Seixas, 183-201. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2004.

  • Wilson, Suzanne M., and Samuel S. Wineburg. “Peering at History through Different Lenses: The Role of Disciplinary Perspectives in Teaching History.” Teachers College Record 80, no. 4 (1988).

  • Wineburg, Samuel S., and Suzanne M. Wilson. “Models of Wisdom in the Teaching of History.” Phi Delta Kappan (1988): 50-58.

  • Wineburg, Samuel S. “On the Reading of Historical Texts: Notes on the Breach Between School and Academy.” American Educational Research Journal 28, no. 3 (1991): 495-519.

  • ———. “Historical Problem Solving: A Study of the Cognitive Processes Used in the Evaluation of Documentary and Pictorial Evidence.” Journal of Educational Psychology 83, no. 1 (1991).

  • Wineburg, Samuel S., and Suzanne M. Wilson. “Subject-matter Knowledge in the Teaching of History.” Advances in Research on Teaching 2 (1991): 305-47.

  • Wineburg, Sam. “Probing the Depths of Students’ Historical Knowledge.” Perspectives 30, no. 3 (Mar 1992): 19-24.

  • Wineburg, Samuel S. “The Psychology of Learning and Teaching History.” In Handbook of Educational Psychology , edited by D. C. Berliner and R. Calfee. New York: Macmillan, 1993.

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