Bibliography — Using Media, Technology, and Material Culture in History Teaching

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  • Kelly, T. Mills. “For Better or Worse? The Marriage of the Web and the Classroom.” ( http://www.h-net.org/aha/papers/Kelly.html

  • ———. “Using New Media to Teach East European History.” ( http://chnm.gmu.edu/assets/historyessays/usingmedia.html

  • Resnick, L. B. Education and Learning to Think . Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 1987.

  • Seixas, Peter. “Popular Film and Young People’s Understanding of the History of Native American-White Relations.” The History Teacher 26, no. 3 (1993): 351-70.

  • ———. “Confronting the Moral Frames of Popular Film: Young People Respond to Historical Relativism.” American Journal of Education 102 (1994): 261-85.

  • Ramsden, John. “Teaching and Learning through the Visual Media.” In History in Higher Education: New Directions in Teaching and Learning , edited by Alan Booth and Paul Hyland, 191-203. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 1996.

  • Spaeth, Donald A. “Computer-Assisted Teaching and Learning.” In History in Higher Education: New Directions in Teaching and Learning , edited by Alan Booth and Paul Hyland, 155-77. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 1996.

  • Walbert, Kathryn L. “Teaching, Collaboration, and the Internet: Joining a Global Conversation.” The Journal of American History 83, no. 4 (March 1997): 1357-60.

  • Kornblith, Gary J. “Dynamic Syllabi for Dummies: Posting Class Assignments on the World Wide Web.” The Journal of American History 84, no. 4 (March 1998): 1447-53.

  • Davies, Peter, Janet Conneely, Rhys Davies, and Derek Lynch. “Imaginative Ideas for Teaching and Learning.” In The Practice of University History Teaching , edited by Alan Booth and Paul Hyland, 112-24. Manchester, U.K.: Manchester University Press, 2000.

  • Glasfurd, Guinevere, and Michael Winstanley. “History in Cyberspace: Challenges and Opportunities of Internet-Based Teaching and Learning.” In The Practice of University History Teaching , edited by Alan Booth and Paul Hyland, 85-97. Manchester, U.K.: Manchester University Press, 2000.

  • Lloyd-Jones, Roger, and Merv Lewis. “Integrating Information Technology into the History Curriculum.” In The Practice of University History Teaching , edited by Alan Booth and Paul Hyland, 70-84. Manchester, U.K.: Manchester University Press, 2000.

  • Dorman, William J. “Affecting Students? Points of View in a Survey of Media Class.” Communication Education 53, no. 4 (Jul 2004): 274-80.

  • Vess, Deborah L. “Asynchronous Discussion and Communication Patterns in Online and Hybrid History Courses.” Communication Education 54, no. 4 (October 2005): 355-64.

  • Rosenzweig, Roy. “Can History Be Open Source? Wikipedia and the Future of the Past.” The Journal of American History 93, no. 1 (Jun 2006).

  • Lloyd-Jones, Roger, and Merv Lewis. “Integrating Information Technology into the History Curriculum.” In The Practice of University History Teaching , edited by Alan Booth and Paul Hyland, 70-84. Manchester, U.K.: Manchester University Press, 2000.

  • Glasfurd, Guinevere, and Michael Winstanley. “History in Cyberspace: Challenges and Opportunities of Internet-Based Teaching and Learning.” In The Practice of University History Teaching , edited by Alan Booth and Paul Hyland, 85-97. Manchester, U.K.: Manchester University Press, 2000.

  • Material Culture

  • Abby Chandler, Teaching with a Tea Set: Using Objects in the US History Survey, Perspectives on History (April 2014)

  • MOOCs

  • Elaine Carey, “Introduction: Why MOOCs Matter,” Perspectives on History (February, 2014)

  • Jonathan Rees, “The Taylorization of the Historian’s Workplace,” Perspectives on History (February, 2014)

  • Jeremy Adelman, “History a la MOOC, Version 2.0,” Perspectives on History (February, 2014)

  • Ann M. Little, “Can Teaching Be Taken ‘to Scale?'” Perspectives on History (February, 2014)

  • Philip Zelikow, “A Worthwhile Experiment,” Perspectives on History (February, 2014)

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