Bibliography — Alphabetical by Author

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Aldous, C., and M. Hicks. A Survey of Historical Source Work in Higher Education. Winchester: King Alfred’s College, 2003.

American Historical Association. Statement on the Standards of Professional Conduct. Washington, D.C.: American Historical Association, 1992.

Andreson, L. “A Useable Trans-Disciplinary Conception of Scholarship.” Higher Education Research and Development, no. 19 (2000): 137-53.

Appleby, Joyce. “Reviving the Teacher Scholar Ideal.” Perspectives 35, no. 4 (April 1997): 3-4.

Association, American Historical, and American Historical Association. Statement on the Standards of Professional Conduct. Washington, D.C.: American Historical Association, 1992.

Axtell, James. The Pleasures of Academe: A Celebration and Defense of Higher Education. Lincoln, Neb.: University of Nebraska Press, 1990.

Badley, Graham. “Improving the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.” Innovations in Education and Teaching International 40, no. 3 (August 2003): 303-309.

Bailey, Douglas, Gabby Devinny, Carre Gordon, and Paul John Schadewald. “AIDS and American History: Four Perspectives on Experiential Learning.” The Journal of American History 86, no. 4 (March 2002): 1721-33.

Bailyn, Bernard. On the Teaching and Writing of History: Responses to a Series of Questions. Hanover, N.H.: University Press of New England, 1994.

Barker, A. “University History 1997.” History Today, no. 47 (1997): 58-61.

Barr, Robert B., and John Tagg. “From Teaching to Learning: A New Paradigm for Undergraduate Education.” Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning 27, no. 6 (1995): 13-25.

Barton, Keith C., and Linda S. Levstik. Teaching History for the Common Good. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2004.

Bass, Randy. “The Scholarship of Teaching: What’s the Problem?” Inventio: Creative Thinking about Teaching and Learning 1, no. 1 (1999): http://www.doit.gmu.edu/Archives/feb98/randybass.htm.

Bates, D. “Undergraduate History 1999.” History Today 49 (1999): 54-60.

Baxter, Maurice G., Robert H. Ferrell, and John E. Wiltz. The Teaching of American History in High Schools. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1964.

Bean, T. W., H. Singer, J. Sorter, and C. Frazee. “Acquisition of Hierarchically Organized Knowledge and Prediction of Events in World History.” Reading Research and Instruction 26, no. 2 (1987): 99-14.

Beaty, L. Developing Your Teaching through Reflective Practice. Birmingham: Staff and Educational Development Association, 1997.

Becher, T., and P. R. Trowler. Academic Tribes and Territories: Intellectual Inquiry and the Cultures of Disciplines. Buckingham: Open University Press, 1989.

Beck, Isabel L., and Margaret G. McKeown. “Toward Meaningful Accounts in History Texts for Young Learners.” Educational Researcher 17, no. 6 (1988): 31-39.

Beck, Isabel L., Margaret G. McKeown, and L. Resnick. “Expository Text for Young Readers: The Issue of Coherence.” In Knowing and Learning: Issues for a Cognitive Psychology of Instruction, 47-66. Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1989.

Beecher, T. “The Significance of Disciplinary Differences.” Studies in Higher Education, no. 19 (1994): 151-61.

Bender, T. “Politics, Intellect, and the American University, 1945-1995.” Daedalus, no. 126 (1998): 1-38.

Bernstein, Dan, and Randy Bass. “The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.” Academe 91, no. 4 (August 2005): 37-43.

Berry, Ettinger, McCullough, and Meneghel. “History from the Bottom Up: On Reproducing Professional Culture in Graduate Education.” The Journal of American History 81, no. 3 (1994): 1137-46.

Blackey, Robert. History Anew: Innovations in the Teaching of History Today. Long Beach, CA: University Press California State University, 1993.

___. Perspectives on Teaching Innovations: Teaching to Think Historically. Washington, D.C.: American Historical Association, 1999.

Booth, Alan. “Rethinking the Scholarly: Developing the Scholarship of Teaching in History.” Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 3, no. 3 (2004): 247-66.

___. Teaching History at University: Enhancing Learning and Understanding. London: Routledge, 2003.

Booth, Alan, and Paul Hyland, eds. History in Higher Education: New Directions in Teaching and Learning. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, 1996.

Booth, Alan, and Paul Hyland, eds. The Practice of University History Teaching. Manchester, UK: Manchester University Press, 2000.

Bordieu, Pierre. Homo Academicus. Cambridge: Polity, 1988.

Bourdillon, Hilary, ed. Teaching History. London: Open University Press, 1994.

Boyd, Josh. “A Different Kind of [Text]Book: Using Fiction in the Classroom. Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.” Communication Education 53, no. 4 (October 2004): 340-47.

Boyer, Ernest L. Scholarship Reconsidered: Priorities of the Professoriate . Princeton, N.J.: The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Education, 1990.

Boys, C., M. Brennan, J. Henkel, M. Kogan, and P. Youll. Higher Education and Preparation for Work. London: Jessica Kingsley, 1988.

Braskamp, L., and J. Ory. Assessing Faculty Work: Enhancing Individual and Institutional Performance. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1994.

Brawley, Sean. “Role-play in Humanities Teaching.” UNSW Compendium of Good Practice in Learning and Teaching 1, no. 1 (June 2004): http://www.ltu.unsw.edu.au/content/userDocs/gpc_1_brawley.pdf.

Brew, A., D. Boud, B. Smith, and S. Brown. Research and Learning in Higher Education. London: Kogan Page, 1995.

Brinkley, Alan. “Historians and their Public.” The Journal of American History 81, no. 3 (December 1994): 1027-30.

Brophy, J. Advances in Research on Teaching: Teaching and Learning History, 1996.

Brown, S., and P. Race. Lecturing: A Practical Guide. London: Kogan Page, 2002.

Burkholder, Peter. “A Content Means to a Critical Thinking End: Group Quizzing in History Surveys,” The History Teacher 47:4 (August 2014): 551–78.

Burman, Mary E., and Audrey Kleinsasser. “Ethical Guidelines for Use of Student Work: Moving from Teaching’s Invisibility to Inquiry’s Visibility in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.” Journal of General Education 53, no. 1 (2004): 59-79.

Calder, Lendol, and William W. Cutler III, and T. Mills Kelly. “History Lessons: Historians and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning” in Mary Taylor Huber and Sherwyn P. Morreale, eds., Disciplinary Styles in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Exploring Common Ground (Washington, D.C.: American Association for Higher Education and The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, 2002), pp.45-67.

Calder, Lendol. “The Stories We Tell,” OAH Magazine of History 27:3 (October 2013): 5-8.

___. “Uncoverage: Toward a Signature Pedagogy for the History Survey.” The Journal of American History 92, no. 4 (2006): http://www.indiana.edu/~jah/textbooks/2006/calder/index.html.

Cambridge, Barbara. “The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Questions and Answers from the Field.” AAHE Bulletin 52, no. 4 (1999): 7-10.

Carretero, Mario, and James F. Voss, eds. Cognitive and Instructional Processes in History and the Social Sciences. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1994.

Cha-Jua, Sundiata Keita, and Robert E. Weems, Jr. “Coming into Focus: The Treatment of African Americans in Post-Civil War United States History Survey Texts.” The Journal of American History 80, no. 4 (1994): 1408-19.

Clark, Jennifer and Adele Nye.‘Surprise Me!’: The (im)possibilities of agency and creativity within the standards framework of history education, Educational Philosophy and Theory , (online 2015) DOI:10.1080/00131857.2015.1104231

College, King Alfred’s, and King Alfred’s College. A Survey of Historical Work in Higher Education. Winchester, UK: King Alfred’s College, 2003.

Cottrell, Scott A., and Elizabeth A. Jones. “Researching the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: An Analysis of Current Curriculum Practices.” Innovative Higher Education 27, no. 3 (Spring 2003): 169-81.

Coventry, Michael, Peter Felten, David Jaffe, Cecilia O’Leary, Tracy Weis, and Susannah McGowan. “Ways of Seeing: Evidence and Learning in the History Classroom.” The Journal of American History 92, no. 4 (2006): 1371.

Cross, K. Patricia. “What Do We Know About Learning and How Do We Know It?.” Atlanta, Georgia, 1998.

Cross, K. Patricia, and Mimi Harris Steadman. Classroom Research: Implementing the Scholarship of Teaching. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1996.

Cuban, Larry. How Scholars Trumped Teachers: Change Without Reform in University Curriculum, Teaching, and Research, 1890-1990. New York: Teachers College Press, 1999.

Davis, M. Elaine. How Students Understand the Past: From Theory to Practice. Walnut Creek, CA: Altamira Press, 2005.

Diamond, R., and B. Adam. “Balancing Institutional, Disciplinary and Faculty Priorities with Public and Social Needs: Defining Scholarship for the 21st Century.” Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 3, no. 1 (2004): 27-37.

­­­___. The Disciplines Speak: Rewarding the Scholarly, Professional, and Creative Work of Faculty. Washington, D.C.: American Association for Higher Education, 1995.

Diaz, Arlene, Joan Middendorf, David Pace, and Leah Shopkow. “The History Learning Project: A Department “Decodes” Its Students,” Journal of American History, Vol. 94, No. 4 (March 2008), pp.1211-1224.

Donald, Janet. Learning to Think: Disciplinary Perspectives. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2002.

Donovan, M. Suzanne and John D. Bransford, eds., How Students Learn: History, Mathematics, and Science in the Classroom (Washington, D.C.: National Academies Press, 2005).

Dorman, William J. “Affecting Students? Points of View in a Survey of Media Class.” Communication Education 53, no. 4 (July 2004): 274-80.

Elton, L. “Research, Teaching and Scholarship in an Expanding Higher Education System.” Higher Education Quarterly, no. 46 (1992): 252-68.

Epstein, Terri. “Deconstructing Differences in African American and European American Adolescences’ Perspectives on United States History.” In Curriculum Inquiry, 2000.

Evans, E., M. Riley, and R. Harris. “University History and School History.” In Fastforward: A Vision for School History 2002-2012. London: Historical Association, 2003.

Felter, Schultz, and Maryanne. “Reading Historically in a Historically Illiterate Culture.” College Teaching 44, no. 4.

Filene, Peter G. “Narrating Progressivism: Unitarian vs. Pluralist vs. Students.” The Journal of American History 79, no. 4 (March 1993): 1546-62.

___. “Teaching the Children of the Vietnam War.” The Journal of American History 85, no. 4 (March 1999): 1535-37.

Fitzgerald, I., and V. Hingley. “University History Today.” History Today, no. 46 (1996): 50-54.

Fournier, Janice E., and Samuel S. Wineburg. “Picturing the Past: Gender Differences in the Depiction of Historical Figures.” American Journal of Education 105, no. 2 (1997): 160-85.

Fox-Genovese, Elizabeth, and E. Lasch-Quinn. Reconstructing History: The Emergence of a New Historical Society. London: Routledge, 1999.

Frederick, Peter J. “Motivating Students by Active Learning in the History Classroom.” Perspectives (October 1993).

Freese, Jeremy, Julie E. Artis, Brian Powell, Bernice Pescosolido, and Ronald Aminzade. “Now I Know my ABC’s: Demythologizing Grade Inflation.” In The Social Worlds of Higher Education: Handbook for Teaching in a New Century, 185-94. Thousand Oaks, California: Pine Forge Press, 1999.

Furgol, Mary. “Teaching History: Passion and Pragmatism.” Inventio; Creative Thinking about Learning and Teaching 1, no. 2 (2000): http://www.doit.gmu.edu/inventio/mfurgol.html .

Gardner, Howard. The Unschooled Mind: How Children Think and How Schools Should Teach. New York: Basic Books, 1995.

Glassick, Charles, Mary Taylor Huber, and Gene I. Maeroff. Scholarship Assessed: Evaluation of the Professoriate. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1997.

Glennon, Fred. “Experiential Learning and Social Justice Action: An Experiment in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.” Teaching Theology and Religion 7, no. 1 (January 2004).

Goode, Chris M. “The Career Goals of History Doctoral Students: Data from the Survey on Doctoral Education and Career Preparation.” Perspectives 39, no. 7 (October 2001): 23.

Gordon, Linda. “The Treatment of Family Issues in United States History Textbooks: General Thoughts and Review of Several Examples.” The Journal of American History 82, no. 2 (1994): 1337-40.

Gosse, Van. “Consensus and Contradiction in Textbooks Treatment of the Sixties.” The Journal of American History 82, no. 2 (September 1995): 658-69.

Graff, G. Beyond the Culture Wars: How Teaching the Conflicts can Revitalize American Education. New York: Norton, 1992.

Valerie, Grim, David Pace, and Leah Shopkow, 2004. “Learning to Use Evidence in the Study of History” (2004).  In David Pace and Joan Middendorf, eds. Decoding the Disciplines: Helping Students Learn Disciplinary Ways of Thinking (New Directions in Teaching and Learning, Vol. 98, 57-65.

Harlan, Louis R. “Social Reform and the Historian.” The Journal of American History 77, no. 3 (December 1990): 801-11.

Hattie, J., and H. Marsh. “The Relationship between Teaching and Research: A Meta-Analysis.” Review of Educational Research, no. 6 (1996): 507-42.

Healey, M. “Developing the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: A Discipline-Based Approach.” Higher Education Research and Development, no. 19 (2000): 168-89.

Henretta, James A. “The Triumph of the Academy: French Style.” The Journal of American History 82, no. 2 (September 1995): 641-43.

History at the University Defense Group. Standards in History: Final Report to the Quality Assurance Agency. London: History at the University Defense Group, 1998.

History Benchmarking Group. Subject Benchmark Statement: Academic Standards – History. Gloucester: Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education, 2000.

Hodes, Martha. “Explorations in Teaching Inspiration: A Seminar for Students Beginning Dissertations.” The Journal of American History 84, no. 4 (March 1998): 1439-46.

Holt, Thomas. “Reconstruction in United States History Textbooks.” The Journal of American History 81, no. 4 (1995): 1641-51.

Horowitz, Helen Lefkowitz. Campus Life: Undergraduate Cultures from the End of the Eighteenth Century to the Present. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1988.

Huber, Mary Taylor. “Balancing Acts: Designing Careers around the Scholarship of Teaching.” Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning 33, no. 4 (August 2001): 21-29.

___. “Faculty Evaluation and the Development of Academic Careers.” New Directions for Institutional Research, no. 114 (Summer 2002): 73-83.

Huber, Mary Taylor, and Pat Hutchings. The Advancement of Learning: Building the Teaching Commons. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2005.

Huber, Mary Taylor, and Sherwyn P. Morreale, eds. Disciplinary styles in the scholarship of teaching and learning: exploring common ground. Washington, D.C.: American Association for Higher Education and The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, 2002.

Husbands, Chris. What is History Teaching? Language, Ideas and Meaning in Learning about the Past. Buckingham: Open University Press, 1996.

Hutchings, Pat. “Competing Goods: Ethical Issues in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.” Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning 35, no. 5 (October 2003): 26-33.

___. Ethics of Inquiry: Issues in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. Menlo Park, CA: The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, 2002.

___. Making Teaching Community Property: A Menu for Peer Collaboration and Peer Review. Washington, D.C.: American Association for Higher Education, 1996.

___.. Opening Lines: Approaches to the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. Menlo Park, CA: The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, 2000.

Hutchings, Pat, ed. The Course Portfolio: How Faculty Can Examine Their Teaching to Advance Practice and Improve Student Learning. Washington, D.C.: American Association for Higher Education, 1988.

Hutchings, Pat. “The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Communication: A Few Words from the Carnegie Academy.” Communication Education 52, no. 1 (January 2003): 57-59.

Hutchings, Pat, C. Bjork, and M. Babb. “The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: An Annotated Bibliography.” Political Science & Politics 35, no. 2 (June 2002): 233-36.

Hutchings, Pat, and Lee S. Shulman. “The Scholarship of Teaching: New Elaborations, New Developments.” Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning 31, no. 5 (October 1999): 10-15.

Hyslop, Anthea. “A Response to Richard White’s ‘Adventures in Collaboration.” History Australia 1, no. 2 (July 2004).

Ian, Stewart. “Using Portfolios to Improve Teaching Quality: The Case of a Small Business School.” Journal of Education for Business 80, no. 2: 75-79.

Jenkins, A., R. Breen, and R. Lindsay. Reshaping Teaching in Higher Education: Linking Teaching with Research. London: Kogan Page, 2003.

Kars, Marjoleine. “History in a Grain of Sand: Teaching the Historians Craft.” The Journal of American History 83, no. 4 (1997): 1340-45.

Kelly, T. Mills. “For Better or Worse? The Marriage of the Web and the Classroom.” h-net.org: http://www.h-net.org/aha/papers/Kelly.html .

___. “Toward Transparency in Teaching: Publishing a Course Portfolio.” Perspectives 39, no. 8.

___. “Using New Media to Teach East European History.” Center for History and the New Media: http://chnm.gmu.edu/assets/historyessays/usingmedia.html .

Kolchin, Peter. “Slavery in United States Survey Textbooks.” The Journal of American History 84, no. 4: 1425-38.

Kornblith, Gary. “Dynamic Syllabi for Dummies: Posting Class Assignments on the World Wide Web.” The Journal of American History 84, no. 4: 1447-53.

Kornblith, Gary, and Carol Lasser. “Teaching the American History Survey at the Opening of the Twenty-First Century: A Round Table Discussion.” The Journal of American History 87, no. 4: 1409-41.

Kreber, C. “A Course-Based Approach to the Development of Teaching-Scholarship: A Case Study.” Teaching in Higher Education 4: 309-25.

___. “Controversy and Consensus on the Scholarship of Teaching.” Studies in Higher Education 27: 152-67.

___. “How University Teaching Award Winners Conceptualise Academic Work: Some Further Thoughts on the Meaning of Scholarship.” Teaching in Higher Education 5: 61-78.

Kreber, C., ed. Scholarship Revisited: Perspectives on the Scholarship of Teaching. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2001.

Lazerson, Marvin, Ursula Wagener, and Nichole Sumanis. “Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 1980-2000.” Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning 32, no. 3: 12-19.

Leinhardt, Gaea. “Weaving Instructional Explanations in History.” British Journal of Educational Psychology 63: 46-74.

Leinhardt, Gaea, Isabel L. Beck, and Catherine Stainton, eds. Teaching and Learning in History. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1994.

Leinhardt, Gaea, Catherine Stainton, and Salim Virgi. “A Sense of History.” Education Psychologist 29, no. 2: 79-88.

Lendol, Calder. “Looking for Learning in the History Survey.” Perspectives (March 2002): 43-45.

Levine, Mel. A Mind at a Time. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Levstik, Linda S., and C. Pappas. “New Directions for Studying Historical Understanding.” Theory and Research in Social Education 20, no. 4: 369-85.

Lewis, Robert A., Jr. “Public Relations and Politics in the Public Schools: Barriers to Academic Preparation for College.” The Journal of American History 81, no. 3.

Levstik, Linda and Keith C. Barton. Researching History Education: Theory. Method, and Context (New York: Routledge, 2002).

Light, G., and R. Cox. Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: The Reflective Professional. London: Sage Publications.

Limerick, Patricia Nelson. “The Case of the Premature Departure: The Trans-Mississippi West and American History Textbooks.” The Journal of American History: 1380-94.

Lipsitz, George. “The Politics and Pedagogy of Popular Culture in Contemporary Textbooks.” The Journal of American History 78, no. 4 (1992): 1395-1400.

Lucal, Betsy, Cheryl Albers, Jeanne Ballantine, Jodi Burmeister-May, Jeffrey Chin, Sharon Dettmer, and Sharon Larson. “Faculty Assessment and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Knowledge Available/Knowledge Needed.” Teaching Sociology 31, no. 2: 146-61.

Ludmilla, Jordanova. History in Practice. London: Arnold, 2000.

Lyons, Nona. “Advancing the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Reflective Portfolio Inquiry in Higher Education – A Case Study of One Institution.” Irish Educational Studies 22, no. 1.

Masur, Louis P. “Pictures have Now Become a Necessity: The Use of Images in American History Textbooks.” The Journal of American History 84, no. 4 (March 1998): 1409-24.

McAleavy, Tony. “Meeting Pupils’ Learning Needs: Differentiation and Progression in the Teaching of History.” Teaching History: 153-68.

McKeown, Margaret G., and Isabel L. Beck. “The Assessment and Characterization of Young Learners’ Knowledge of a Topic in History.” American Educational Research Journal 27, no. 4: 688-726.

Menges, R., and Maryellen Weimer. Teaching on Solid Ground: Using Scholarship to Improve Practice. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Mentkowski, M. Learning that Lasts: Integrating Learning, Development and Performance in College and Beyond. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Messer-Davidow, E., D. Shumway, and D. Sylvan. Knowledges: Historical and Critical Studies in Disciplinarity. Charlottesville, VA: University Press of Virginia.

Miller, Montserrat marti. “Applying Cognitive Learning Approaches in History Teaching: An Experiment in a World History Course.” The History Teacher 28, no. 2: 185-204.

Miller, Susan Kay, Shelley Rodrigo, and Veronica Pantoja. “Institutional Models for Engaging Faculty in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.” Teaching English in the Two-Year College 32, no. 1: 30-38.

Middendorf, Joan, Jolanta Mickutė, Tara Saunders, José Najar, David Pace, and Andrew E Clark-Huckstep, “What’s feeling got to do with it?  Decoding emotional bottlenecks in the history classroom,” Arts and Humanities in Higher Education,14 (April 2015) pp.166-180.

Moffatt, Michael. Coming of Age in New Jersey: College and American Culture. New Brunswick, NJ.

Nye, Adele. & Hughes-Warrington, Marnie., Roe, Jill., Russell, Penny., Deacon, Desley. and Kiem, Paul. “Exploring Historical Thinking and Agency with Undergraduate History Students.” Studies in Higher Education, 36(7), (2011): 763-780.

Nye, Adele, Hughes-Warrington, Marnie, Roe, Jill, Russell, Penny, Peel, Mark, Deacon, Desley, Laugesen, Amanda. & Kiem, Paul. “Historical thinking in Higher Education: Staff and student perceptions of the nature of historical thinking.” History Australia, 6(3), (2009): 73.1-73.18.

Nye, Adele. “Historical Thinking and Objects of Nostalgia”, International Journal of Research on History Didactics, History Education and History Culture: Yearbook of the International Society of History Didactics. 37, (2016): 37-57.

Nye, Adele. “Rethinking Evidence: Assessment in the History Discipline in Australian Universities” In P. Layne and P. Lake, (Eds.) Global Innovation of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, Springer, (2015): 91-104

O’Meara, Kerry Ann. “Encouraging Multiple Forms of Scholarship in Faculty Reward Systems: Influence on Faculty Work Life.” Planning for Higher Education 34, no. 2: 43-53.

Ottewill, Roger, and Bruce Macfarlane. “Quality and the Scholarship of Teaching: Learning from Subject Review.” Quality in Higher Education 10, no. 3: 231-41.

Pace, David. “The Amateur in the Operating Room: History and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.” American Historical Review 109, no. 4: 1171-91.

Pace, David, and Joan Middendorf, eds. Decoding the Disciplines: Helping Students Learn Disciplinary Ways of Thinking in New Directions in Teaching and Learning. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2004.

Pace, David. The Decoding the Disciplines Paradigm (Indiana University Press) (Spring 2016).

___. “Decoding Historical Evidence,” in David Ludvigsson, ed., Enhancing Student Learning in History. Perspectives on University History Teaching (University of Uppsala, Sweden: Swedish Science Press, 2012), pp.49-62.

___.  “Opening history’s ‘black boxes’: Decoding the disciplinary unconscious of historians” in Caroline Kreber (Ed.), Teaching and Learning Within and Beyond disciplinary boundaries (London: Routledge, 2008). pp. 96-104.

___. “Decoding the Reading of History: An Example of the Process,” in  David Pace and Joan Middendorf, Decoding the Disciplines: Helping Students Learn Disciplinary Ways of Thinking (New Directions in Teaching and Learning, Vol. 98 (Fall 2004).

Pace, David and Joan Middendorf, “Using Just-in-time teaching in history.” In S. Simkins & M. Maier (Eds.), Just-in-Time Teaching Across the Disciplines and Across the Academy (Sterling, VA: Stylus, 2010), pp. 153-162.

Parker, Jan. “Disciplines: Carnegie, Cornell, and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.” Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 2, no. 3: 142-.

Payne, Stephen L., J. Michael Whitfield, and Jo Ann Flynn. “Assessing the Business Capstone Course through a Method Based on the SOTL and the Stakeholder Process.” Journal of Education for Business 78, no. 2: 69-74.

Perry, William G. Forms of Intellectual and Ethical Development in the College Years. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, Inc.

Philisper, Dirk. “Test the West: American History through the Lens of German Survey Texts.” The Journal of American History 82, no. 2: 651-57.

Picard, Alyssa, and Joseph J. Gonzalez. “On the Road and out of the Box: Teaching the Civil Rights Movement from a Chrysler Minivan.” The Journal of American History 88, no. 4: 1461-66.

Porter, J. “Contextualizing Learning and Teaching: Academics and the History Curriculum of the Future.” Innovations in Education and Teaching International 26: 205-18.

Resnick, L. B. Education and Learning to Think. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

Rice, E. “What It Means to be a Scholar.” Teaching Excellence: 1-2.

Rodreguez, Joseph A., and Vicki L. Ruiz. “At Loose Ends: Twentieth-Century Latinos in Current United States History Textbooks.” The Journal of American History 86, no. 4 (March 2002): 1689-99.

Roeder, George H., Jr. “Coming to Our Senses.” The Journal of American History 81, no. 3: 1112-22.

Rogers, J. Adults Learning. Buckingham, UK: Open University Press.

Rosenweig, Roy. “Can History be Open Source? Wikipedia and the Future of the Past.” The Journal of American History 93, no. 1.

Rosenweig, Roy, and David Thelan. The Presence of the Past: Popular Uses of History in American Life. New York: Columbia University Press.

Rowland, S. The Enquiring University Teacher. Buckingham, UK: Open University Press.

Rudolph, Frederick. Curriculum: A History of the American Undergraduate Course of Study since 1636. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Rust, C. Improving Student Learning Through the Disciplines. Oxford: Oxford Brookes University.

Salvucci, Linda K. “Did NAFTA Rewrite History? Recent Mexican Views of the United States Past.” The Journal of American History 82, no. 2:643-47.

Schama, Simon. “Clio Has a Problem.” The New York Times Magazine: 29-33.

Schon, D. “The New Scholarship Requires a New Epistemology: Knowing in Action.” Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning 27: 27-34.

Seip, Terry Lee. We Shall Gladly Teach”: Preparing History Graduate Students for the Classroom. Washington, D.C.: American Historical Association.

Seixas, Peter. “Confronting the Moral Frames of Popular Film: Young People Respond to Historical Relativism.” American Journal of Education,102: 261-85.

___. “Mapping the Terrain of Historical Significance.” Social Education 61: 22-27.

___. “Popular Film and Young People’s Understanding of the History of Native American-White Relations.” The History Teacher 26, no. 3: 351-70.

___. “Preservice Teachers Assess Students’ Prior Historical Understanding.” Social Studies 85, no. 2: 91-95.

___. “Students’ Understanding of Historical Significance.” Theory and Research in Social Education 22: 281-304.

Seixas, Peter, ed. Theorizing Historical Consciousness. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Seixas, Peter. “When Psychologists Discuss Historical Thinking: A Historian’s Perspective.” Education Psychologist 29, no. 2: 107.

Seixas, Peter, and A. Pace. “Towards a Conception of Prior Historical Understanding.” In Beyond Prior Knowledge: Issues in Text Processing and Conceptual Change. Norwood, NJ.

Seixas, Peter, and Sam Wineburg. “History, Memory, Research, and the Schools: A Report on the Pittsburgh Conference.” Perspectives 37, no. 3: 28-31.

Shaffer, Robert. “Mr. Yamamoto and Japanese Americans in New Jersey during World War II.” The Journal of American History 84, no. 4: 1454-56.

Shapiro, Howard N. “Promotion & Tenure & Scholarship of Teaching & Learning.” Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning 38, no. 2: 38-43.

Sheila, Tobias. “Disciplinary Cultures and General Education: What Can We Learn From Our Learners?” Teaching Excellence 4, no. 6: 1-3.

Sherry, Michael S. “We Value Teaching Despite–and Because of–Its Low Status.” The Journal of American History 81, no. 2: 1051-54.

Shopkow, Leah, Arlene Diaz, Joan Middendorf, and David Pace. “The History Learning Project ‘Decodes’ a Discipline” in Kathleen McKinney, Ebbs, Flows, and Rips: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning In and Across the Disciplines (Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 2012).

Shopkow, Leah. “From Bottlenecks to Epistemology in History: Changing the Conversation about the Teaching of History in Colleges and Universities,” Changing the Conversation about Higher Education, Robert Thompson, ed., Rowman and Littlefield, 2013.

Shrock, Alice Almond, and Randal Shrock. “Engaging the Past.” The Journal of American History 81, no. 3: 1903-98.

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