Department of History
 

Lynn Struve

  • Professor Emeritus, Department of History

Education

  • Ph.D. at University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, 1974

Contact Information

Ballantine Hall, Rm. 742
(812) 855-7581

Background

Lynn Struve

Enduring interest in the political, intellectual, and cultural history of the seventeenth century in China, and in comparing Chinese phenomena of the sixteenth through eighteenth centuries with contemporaneous phenomena in other parts of the world. Research has focused on the primary sources of the fall of the Ming dynasty and the conquest and early rule of China by the Manchu-Qing dynasty, particularly on the many personal records left by people of that time, which vividly reveal the subjective consciousness of members of the literate social stratum as their world fell into turmoil. Other, related specializations are Ming and Qing historiography (both official and unofficial), late-imperial trends in Neo-Confucianism and classical scholarship, and psychological aspects of autobiographical expression in the Ming-Qing era.

Experienced in conducting research in Chinese rare books and archives, especially in the People's Republic and Taiwan, for which grants have been received from the American Council of Learned Societies, the Fulbright Foundation, and the Committee for Scholarly Research in the PRC.

Research Interests

  • Pre-modern China
  • Chinese political
  • Intellectual and cultural history

Courses Recently Taught

  • East Asia in World History
  • Traditional East Asian Civilization
  • China: The Age of Glory
  • China: The Later Empires
  • Traditional Chinese Society throught Literature
  • Premodern East Asia: Integrative Issues

Publication Highlights

Books

The Southern Ming, 1644-1662, 1984

Voices from the Ming-Qing Cataclysm: China in Tigers' Jaws, 1993

The Ming-Qing Conflict, 1619-1683: A Historiography and Source Guide, 1998

(ed.) The Qing Formation in World-Historical Time, 2004

(ed.) Time, Temporality, and Imperial Transition: East Asia from Ming to Qing, 2005