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Teaching College History

H580—Taching of College History, Spring 2006

Instructor: David Pace
Office Hours: Monday 2:00-4:00; Wednesday 2:30-3:30 or by appointment, B.H. 832
E-Mail:

Goals of the Course

Teaching is an art, but like other arts, it is best cultivated through mastering basic techniques, learning from the experiences of others, and studying the theoretical underpinnings of the practice. H580 is designed to help facilitate these processes.

At the core of this course are two notions, which are assumed to be self-evident:

  1. that effective teaching is as crucial to the career development of most historians as research skills and
  2. that teaching, like effective research, is the result of study, hard work, and the systematic cultivation of personal abilities. For those who intend to pursue a career as a professor, failure to develop skills in the area of pedagogy can lead to a frustrating or, even, truncated career.

In this course a critical analysis of relevant pedagogical literature will be combined with exposure to a variety of specific techniques to assist you in the cultivation of your own teaching styles. We will focus on achieving the following goals:

  1. The creation of a context in which teaching problems and approaches can be freely discussed.
  2. The exploration of current scholarship on teaching and learning history.
  3. A greater understanding of cognitive and affective factors which may affect the learning of undergraduates.
  4. The consideration of alternatives to traditional teaching approaches.
  5. The development of our individual styles of teaching and of increased consciousness of the choices each of us make in the classroom.
  6. The cultivation of an ability to develop and share teaching strategies which will be of assistance in obtaining a teaching job, in sharing your experiences with their future colleagues, and in developing and maintaining a rewarding and satisfying career.

This course is offered as two separate one-credit courses that may be taken separately or together. Parts I and II constitute the first credit, and Parts III and IV the second.

You should expect to emerge from this course with a number of specific teacher strategies that you can apply in future courses, an overview of the major issues being currently discussed concerning the teaching and learning of history on the college level, and the ability to present your ideas about teaching knowledgeably and professionally.

Course Requirements

H580 is taught on a pass/fail basis. To pass, a student must complete all the work listed below to my satisfaction and must take part in the exploration of teaching strategies and problems during class discussions. The date when these are due are indicated on the schedule of readings. All of the written work should be uploaded to the drop box in the OnCourse site for our class by 9:00 A.M. on the day that the assignment is listed on the syllabus. Here are the types of work required:

  1. Eight Essays Written in Response to Specific Questions on the Syllabus
    I have organized the work for the course around eight essays (four in each half of the course). This work is designed to help you capture and apply the ideas from the readings to your own developing strategies for teaching so that they will be readily available to you in the future. You will also be producing materials that you can use in future job searches. The essays should be 2-3 pages long, not counting end notes, and they should make specific reference to materials in the readings.
  2. The Plan for a Course that You are Prepared to Teach
    As part of the course you will develop a course description and a syllabus, which will be suitable for submission as part of a teaching dossier or as part of an application to teach a course on our campus. The syllabus should provide your future students with a clear over view of what they can expect in your course, weekly reading assignments (you need not give specific page numbers), and a clear indication of what kinds of exams or papers will be used.
  3. Other Assignments
    There will be a few other small assignments mentioned in the syllabus, including "Medusa" questions, feedback to your classmates on their course plans, etc.
  4. Classroom Observations
    By the times indicated on the schedule of readings you should have completed the observation of two classes in other courses: a small discussion (under 30 students) and a large class (more than fifty students). You will write a two-page description and evaluation of the class your attend, discussing the positive and negative aspects of the methods being used, and relating what you have observed to material read in class. There should be no indication of the identity of the lecturer, either directly through the use of his or her name or indirectly through specific references to the subject matter of the class.
  5. Teaching a Section of the Course
    The class will be divided into groups of four or five, and each will be responsible for planning and teaching about an hour's worth of material from one day's class. In most cases this will involve identifying extra readings for the rest of us, preparing a lesson plan, and conducting the class. I have listed below some of the topics to be covered, but if a group has a special interest in some issue, they can teach it, after consultation with me.
    1. Reading history
    2. Writing history
    3. Preconceptions about history that students bring into the class
    4. The use of technology in teaching history
    5. History teaching as a vocation
    6. Institutional and historical dimensions of contemporary history teaching.

Texts

  1. Wilbert J. McKeachie et al, Teaching Tips: Strategies, Research and Theory for College and University Teachers [Any of the editions since the early 1990s should do.]
  2. Sam Wineburg, Historical Thinking and Other Unnatural Acts: Charting the Future of Teaching the Past (Philadelphia, PA.: Temple University Press, 2001)
  3. "Teaching College History" Reader (Available in campus bookstores)

Part 1—Discussion

Week 1: Jan. 11—Introduction

(Contemporary discussions of teaching/learning, objectives, individual styles and roles, what is special about teaching history, the goals of this course)

Readings:

  1. Arthur Chickering and Zelda F. Gamson, "Seven Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education," New Directions for Teaching and Learning, No. 47 (Fall 1991), pp. 63-69. (Available through On-Course Resources)
  2. Robert B. Barr and John Tagg, "From Teaching to Learning: A New Paradigm for Undergraduate Education," Change (Nov.-Dec. 1995), pp. 13-21 (On E-Reserve)
  3. Mel Spector, "'Look at Me! A Teaching Primer," The Chronicle of Higher Education (September 27, 2002), p.B15.
  4. David Lowenthal, "Dilemmas and Delights of Learning History" in Peter N. Stearns, Peter Seixas, and Sam Wineburg, ed., Knowing, Teaching, and Learning History: National and International Perspectives (New York: New York University Press, 2000), 63-82.(Available through On-Course Resources)
  5. David Pace, "The Amateur in the Operating Room: History and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning," American Historical Review, Vol. 109, No. 4 (October 2004), pp.1171-1192.

Week 2: Jan. 18—Leading Discussion (1) and the Role of Disciplines

(Establishing course objectives [cont.], strategies for asking questions, management of discussion, and the impact of disciplinary differences on student learning.)

Readings (1)—Leading Discussion

  1. Wilbert J. McKeachie et al, Teaching Tips: Strategies, Research and Theory for College and University Teachers (Nineth Edition, 1994), Chapters 3 ("Meeting a Class for the First Time") Chapter 4 ("Facilitating Discussions")
  2. Mel Silberman, "Ten Tips When Facilitating Discussion" from Active Learning; 100 Strategies to Teach Any Subject, pp., 24-26.
  3. Joan Middendorf, "Learning Students Names" (On E-Reserve)

Readings (2)—The Role of Disciplines in Student Learning

  1. Sheila Tobias, "Disciplinary Cultures and General Education: What can we learn from our learners?," Teaching Excellence, Vol. 4, No.6 (1992-1993) in "Teaching College History Reader"
  2. "Cognitive Apprenticeship II: Modeling Metacognition," The National Teaching and Learning Forum, Vol.1, No.2 (1991) in "Teaching College History Reader"
  3. Sam Wineburg, "Historical Thinking and Other Unnatural Acts" and "On the Reading of Historical Texts: Notes on the Breach Between School and Academy," Historical Thinking and Other Unnatural Acts (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2001), pp.3-27, 63-88.

Essay 1—What is special about history as a discipline and how will you take that into consideration in shaping your courses?

Assignments:

  1. Develop in outline form a strategy for leading a discussion on a particular reading or set of readings in your field or in a discussion section you will be running. Provide some of the questions you would like to ask at appropriate points and give an indication of the kinds of outcomes you are seeking.
  2. Compose 3 "Medusa" questions (i.e. questions which are guaranteed to kill discussion). Try to incorporate a nuber of different elements which are detrimental to discussion in each question.

Week 3: Jan. 25—Leading Discussion (II)

(Alternatives to direct questioning: structures for encouraging discussion, buzz groups, debates, role playing, use of A-V in discussion, problem solving, and the use of documents)

Readings:

  1. Peter Frederick, "The Dreaded Discussion—Ten Ways to Start," Improving College and University Teaching, Vol. 29 , No. 3, pp. 109-114 in "Teaching College History Reader".
  2. Mary Lynn Crow, "Teaching as an Interactive Process" New Directions for Teaching and Learning, 1 (1980), pp. 41-55 in "Teaching College History Reader"
  3. Peter J. Frederick, "Motivating Students by Active Learning in the History Classroom," Perspectives (October 1993), pp. 15-19. (On E-Reserve)
  4. McKeachie et al, Teaching Tips, Chapter 14 ("Reading as Active Learning")

Essay 2—How do you intend to approach leading discussion?

Assignments:

  1. Report of Observation of small class due.

Part II—Undergraduates

Week 4: Feb. 1—Models of Student Learning

(Learning styles, stages of cognitive development, and other psychological models of learning)

Readings:

  1. Leah Savion and Joan Middendorf, "Enhancing Concept Comprehension and Retention," The National Teaching and Learning Forum, Vol. 3, No. 4 (1994), pp. 6-8 in "Teaching College History Reader"
  2. William G. Perry, Jr., "Cognitive and Ethical Growth: The Making of Meaning," Arthur W. Chickering and Associates, eds., The Modern American College (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1981), pp. 76-109 in "Teaching College History Reader"
  3. Robert J. Kloss, "A Nudge is Best: Helping Students through the Perry Scheme of Intellectual Development," College Teaching, Vol.42, No.4 , pp. 151-158 in "Teaching College History Reader"
  4. Barbara J. Duch and Mary K. Norton, "Teaching for Cognitive Growth," Teaching Excellence, Vol. 4, No. 8 (1992-1993), pp. 97-98. On E-Reserve
  5. Sam Wineburg, "The Psychology of Teaching and Learning History," Historical Thinking and Other Unnatural Acts (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2001), pp.28-60.

Essay 3—What are the most important things that you want to keep in mind concerning the intellectual and social development of your students when you are designing courses?

Week 5: Feb. 8—The Cultural Experience of College

(The impact of the cultural experience of undergraduates on learning)

Readings:

  1. Bette L. Erikson and Diane W. Strommer, "From High School to College: The Entering Freshman" Teaching College Freshmen, pp. 3 45 (E-Reserve)
  2. Patrick Terenzini, et al, "Making the Transition to College" from Robert J. Menges, Maryellen Weimer, and Associations, eds., Teaching on Solid Ground: Using Scholarship to Improve Practice, pp. 43-73. (E-Reserve)
  3. Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz, Campus Life; Undergraduate Culture from the End of the Eighteenth Century to the Present, pp. ix-xiv, 3-22 in "Teaching College History Reader"
  4. Michael Moffatt, "Chapter 2: What College is Really Like," from Coming of Age in New Jersey: College and American Culture (New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 1989), pp.25-44, 50-61 in "Teaching College History Reader"

Week 6: Feb. 15—Diversity in the Student Body

(The role of gender, race, and class in formulating teaching strategies)

Readings:

  1. McKeachie et al, Teaching Tips, Chapter 10 ("Valuing Student Differences")
  2. Mike Rose, "The Politics of Remediation" from Lives on the Boundary: the Struggles and Achievements of America's Underprepared (New York: Penguin Books, 1990) in Teaching College History Reader
  3. Lee Warren, "Class in the Classroom," Teaching Resources Center, Vol. 10, No. 1 (Fall 1998), pp. 1-3 in "Teaching College History Reader"
  4. Claude Steele, "Race and the Schooling of Black Americans," Atlantic Monthly (April 1992), pp. 68 76 in "Teaching College History Reader"
  5. Peter Frederick, "Walking on Eggs; Mastering the Dreaded Diversity Discussion," College Teaching, 43(3), pp. 83-92 in "Teaching College History Reader"
  6. Peggy McIntosh, "White Privilege and Male Privilege: A Personal Account of Coming to See Correspondences through Work in Women's Studies," Working Paper, No.189, Wellesley College Center for Research on Women, 1988) in "Teaching College History Reader"
  7. Deborah Tannen, "Teacher's Classroom Strategies Should Recognize That Men and Women Use Language Differently," Chronicle of Higher Education, vol. XXXVII, no. 40 (June 1991) in "Teaching College History Reader"
  8. Bernice Resnick Sandler and Ellen Hoffman, "Encouraging Women to Talk in Class" on E-Reserve. (On E-Reserve)
  9. Sam Wineburg, "Picturing the Past," Historical Thinking and Other Unnatural Acts (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2001), pp 113-136.

Week 7: Feb. 22—Instructor-Student Interactions

(Questions of "fairness," ethical issues, sexual harassment, challenges from students, analysis of transactions, and cognitive development in students.)

Readings:

  1. McKeachie et al, Teaching Tips, Chapter 7 ("What to Do About Cheating"), Chapter 9 ("Motivation in the College Classroom"), Chapter 11 ("Problem Students"), Chapter 12 ("Counseling, Advising, and Educating"), Chapter 25 ("Teaching Values"), and Chapter 26 ("Ethics in College Teaching")
  2. Raymond P. Perry, Verna H. Menec, and C. Ward Struthers, "Student Motivation from the Teacher's Perspective" from Robert J. Menges, Maryellen Weimer, and Associations, eds., Teaching on Solid Ground: Using Scholarship to Improve Practice, pp. 75 100 in "Teaching College History Reader"
  3. Joyce L. Hocker, "Teacher-Student Confrontations," New Directions for Teaching and Learning, No.26 (June 1986), 71-82 (On E-Reserve)
  4. Donelson R. Forsyth and James H. McMillan, "Practical Proposals for Motivating Students, New Directions for Teaching and Learning, No. 45 (Spring 1991), pp. 53-65 (On E-Reserve)
  5. Myra Sadker and David Sadker. "Assuring Equitable Participation in College Classes" New Directions for Teaching and Learning, No.49 (Spring 1992), pp.49-56. (E-Reserve)
  6. Janis F. Andersen, "Instructor Nonverbal Communication: Listening to Our Silent Messages" New Directions for Teaching and Learning, No. 26 (June 1986), pp. 41-49 (On E-Reserve)
  7. David Pace, "Controlled Fission: Teaching Supercharged Subjects," College Teaching, (Spring 2003) (On E-Reserve)
  8. Patricia Nelson Limerick, The Phenomenon of Phantom Students: Diagnosis and Treatment (On E-Reserve)
  9. Marcia Ann Pulich, "Student Grade Appeals Can Be Reduced," Improving College and University Teaching, Vol. 31, No. 1, pp. 9-12.(On E-Reserve)

Essay 4—How do you intend to take into account the differences among your students and what kind of strategies do you want to develop to maximize productive encounters with your students?

Recommended:

  1. Janet Mancini Billson and Richard G. Tiberius, "Effective Social Arrangements for Teaching and Learning," New Directions for Teaching and Learning, No. 45 (Spring 1991), pp. 87-109. (E-Reserve)

Part III—Course Construction

Week 8: March 1—Strategies of Course Construction

(Conceptualization of course, syllabus, setting goals.)

Readings:

  1. McKeachie et al, Teaching Tips, Chapter 2 ("Countdown for Course Preparation")
  2. Sharon Rubin, "Professors, Students, and the Syllabus," The Chronicle of Higher Education, Aug. 7, 1985. (E-Reserve)
  3. Kathleen T. Brinko, "Visioning Your Course: Questions to Ask as You Design Your Course," The Teaching Professor, February 1991 (On E-Reserve)
  4. Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe, "What is Backward Design?" from Understanding By Design, pp.7-19 in "Teaching College History Reader" [N.B. This work was written largely in response to the problems encountered in K-12 classrooms, and it will be necessary for you to adapt it for use on the college level.]
  5. ADD Lendol's JAH article

Assignments:

  1. Create a brief description of a course that you would like to teach. Indicate the subject matter, the level at which it would be taught, and the nature and size of the presumed student body.
  2. Prepare a draft of the syllabus for this course, including topics for lecture and/or discussion for each class period and an introduction for the students in which you describe the subject matter, the requirements, grading procedures, the benefits of the course, and any other information which you think appropriate. It is not necessary at this stage to indicate the readings.
  3. Place a copy of both the course description and the syllabus on in the "Resources" section in OnCourse. (NB: You will be working with this course through the rest of the semester. Therefore, you may wish to focus on a subject which you really may teach some day and which might be helpful to you on the job market.)

Essay 5—What pedagogical principles and ways of viewing student learning have shaped the formation of your course?

Week 9: March 22—Lecturing

(Basic techniques of organizing and presenting a lecture; student reception of lectures)

Readings:

  1. McKeachie et al, Teaching Tips, Chapter 5 ("How to Make Lectures More Effective")
  2. Peter Frederick, "The Lively Lecture—Ten Variations," College Teaching, Vol. 34, No. 2, pp. 43-50 in "Teaching College History Reader"
  3. Joan Middendorf and Alan Kalish, "The 'Change-up' in Lectures" in "Teaching College History Reader"
  4. Maryellen Gleason, "Better Communication in Large Classes," College Teaching, Vol. 34, No. 1, pp. 20-24 in "Teaching College History Reader"
  5. Nancy Goulden, "Improving Instructor's Speaking Skills" (On E-Reserve)
  6. Janis F. Andeson, "Instructor Nonverbal Communication: Listening to Our Slient Messages" in J.M. Civikly, ed., Communication in College Classrooms, New Directions in Teaching and Learning, no.26 (June 1986), pp.41-49 (On E-Reserve)

Assignments:

  1. Observation of a large class due
  2. Compose an outline (1-2 pages) for a lecture in the course that you are designing.
  3. Place in the OnCourse Drop Box one-page critiques of each of the course descriptions and syllabi produced by your team members and e-mail a copy of each to the author

Week 10: March 29—Assessment and Writing

(Getting feedback on student learning, creation of exams, paper assignments, materials for students, etc.)

Readings:

  1. McKeachie et al, Teaching Tips, Chapter 6 ("Assessing, Testing, and Evaluating") and Chapter 8 ("The ABC's of Assigning Grades")
  2. Thomas A. Angelo and K. Patricia Cross, Classroom Assessment Techniques: A Handbook for College Teachers, pp.3-11, 25-59 (In History Department Pedagogical Library)
  3. Robert Blackey, "A Guide to the Skill of Essay Construction in History," Social Education (March 1981). Reprinted in Robert Blackey, ed., History Anew: Innovations in the Teaching of History Today (Long Beach, California: California State University Press, 1993, pp.49-58 in "Teaching College History Reader"
  4. Ann McCormick Scott, "Life is a Multiple Choice Question" Perspectives, December 1983. Reprinted in Robert Blackey, ed., History Anew: Innovations in the Teaching of History Today (Long Beach, California: California State University Press, 1993), pp.59-72 (On E-Reserve)
  5. Ray W. Karras, "A Multidimensional Multiple-Choice Testing System," Perspectives, February 1984. Reprinted in Robert Blackey, ed., History Anew: Innovations in the Teaching of History Today (Long Beach, California: California State University Press, 1993), pp.73-81. (On E-Reserve)
  6. John C. Bartul, "Teaching the Value of Inquiry Through the Essay Question," Perspectives, November 1989. Reprinted in Robert Blackey, ed., History Anew: Innovations in the Teaching of History Today (Long Beach, California: California State University Press, 1993), pp.85-89 on E-Reserve
  7. Alfie Kohn, "Group Grade Grubbing versus Cooperative Learning," Educational Leadership 43 (5), pp. 83-87.(On E-Reserve)
  8. Gaea Leinhardt, "Lessons on Teaching and Learning in History from Paul's Pen" in Peter N. Stearns, Peter Seixas, and Sam Wineburg, eds., Knowing, Teaching, and Learning History: National and International Perspectives in "Teaching College History Reader".
  9. Young, Kathleen McCarthy and Gaea Leinhardt, "Writing from Primary Documents: A Way of Knowing in History," Written Communication, 15 (1) (1998), pp.25-86. (On E-Reserve)

Assignment:

  1. Using the procedures outlined in Angelo and Cross define a learning goal for the students in the class that you are designing and adapt one of the classroom assessment techniques from their books to your class. (Please include the number of the technique you are adapting to your class.) Be sure to describe your goal as explicitly as possible and explain how the assessment technique will measure student learning in the area that you specified and how it will be carried out in the context of your class.

Week 11: April 5—Collaborative Learning, Active Learning, and Other Alternatives to the Traditional Classroom

Readings:

  1. McKeachie et al, Teaching Tips, Chapter 15 ("Active Learning"), Chapter 16 ("Problem-based Learning"), Chapter 18 ("Teaching Large Classes"), Chapter 20 "Facilitating Experiential Learning"), and Chapter 21 ("Using Project Methods")
  2. Barbara Gross Davis, "Collaborative Learning: Group Work and Study Teams" from Tools for Teaching (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1993) on E-Reserve
  3. Larry K. Michaelsen, "Three Keys to Using Learning Groups Effectively," Essays on Teaching Excellence, Vol.9, No.5 (1997-98) in "Teaching College History Reader"

Assignment:

  1. Prepare a second draft of your course syllabus. This time include readings. You do not have to provide the exact page numbers, but you should indicate whether the materials will be a course reader.

Essay 6:—What methods of teaching do you intend to use in your course (lecturing, discussion, collaborative learning, paper writing etc), how do you intend to use them, and why have you chosen this mix of approaches?

Week 12: April 12—Teaching Basic Skills and Critical Thinking

Readings:

  1. McKeachie et al, Teaching Tips, Chapter 13 ("Teaching Students to Learn Through Writing"), Chapter 23 ("Teaching Students to Learn"), and Chapter 24 ("Teaching Thinking")
  2. Robert F Berkhofer, Jr., "Demystifying Historical Authority: Critical Textual Analysis in the Classroom," Perspectives (February 1988). Reprinted in Robert Blackey, ed., History Anew: Innovations in the Teaching of History Today (Long Beach, California: California State University Press, 1993, pp.21-27) on E-Reserve.
  3. Michael Robertson, "Writing and Responding" in Mimi Schwartz, ed., Writer's Craft, Teacher's Art: Teaching What We Know (Portsmouth, N.H.: Boynton/Cook Publishers, 1991), pp. 115-124 on E-Reserve
  4. Joan Middendorf and David Pace, "`Decoding the disciplines: A Model for Helping Students Learn Disciplinary Ways of Thinking" and David Pace, "Decoding the Disciplines: An Example of the Process" in David Pace and Joan Middendorf, eds., Decoding the Disciplines: Helping Students Learn Disciplinary Ways of Thinking (New Directions in Teaching and Learning, Vol. 98 (Fall 2004), pp.1-21 in "Teaching College History Reader".
  5. Robert B. Bain, "Into the Breach: Using Research and Theory to Shape History Instruction" in Peter N. Stearns, Peter Seixas, and Sam Weinburg, eds., Knowing, Teaching, and Learning History: National and International Perspectives (New York: New York University Press, 2000), pp.331-352 on E-Reserve
  6. Charles A. Perfetti, M. Anne Britt, Jean-François Rouet, Mara C. Georgi, and Robert A. Mason, "How Students Use Texts to Learn and Reason about Historical Uncertainty," Mario Carretero and James F. Voss, eds., Cognitive and Instructional Processes in History and the Social Sciences (Hillsdale, N.J.: 1994), pp.257-283 on E-Reserve

Assignment:

  1. Compose a one-page essay in which you discuss the skills needed for students to do well in your course. If you intend to make the teaching of some of these skills a part of your teaching strategy, explain how you would go about it. If not, be as precise as possible concerning the types of operations you expect the students to be able to perform when they come into the course.

Essay 7—How do you intend to deal with students with different levels of skills and different preconceptions about history?

Week 13: April 19—Students Prior Conceptions of History and the Use of Technology

Readings:

  1. Linda S. Levstik, "Articulating the Silences: Teachers' and Adolescents' Conceptions of Historical Significance," in Peter N. Stearns, Peter Seixas, and Sam Weinburg, eds., Knowing, Teaching, and Learning History: National and International Perspectives (New York: New York University Press, 2000), pp.284-305 in "Teaching College History Reader" Sam Wineburg, "Making (Historical) Sense in the New Millennium," Historical Thinking and Other Unnatural Acts (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2001), pp.232-255.

Part IV—Career Development

Week 14: April 26—Evaluation of Teaching, the Development of a Philosophy of Teaching, and the Formation of Carer Strategies

(Improving teaching over time, using teaching to gain and maintain employment, the institutional framework of a teaching career)

Readings (1)—New Visions of Academia and of Scholarship

  1. McKeachie et al, Teaching Tips, Chapter 27 Pat Hutchings and Lee Shulman "The Scholarship of Teaching: New Elaborations, New Developments," Change (Sep/Oct 99), pp. 11-15
  2. Lee S. Shulman, "Teaching as Community Property: Putting an End to Pedagogical Solitude," Change (Nov./Dec. 1993), pp.6-7
  3. Palmer J. Parker, The Courage to Teach; Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher's Life (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1998), pp. 1-16 in "Teaching College History Reader"

Readings (2)—Maneuvering in Academia, New or Old

  1. McKeachie, Teaching Tips, Chapter 1
  2. Marcia Ann Pulich, "Better Use of Student Evaluations for Teaching Effectiveness," Improving College Teaching and Learning, Vol. 32, No. 2, pp. 91-94 on E-Reserve
  3. Peter Seldin, The Teaching Portfolio, pp. 1-19, 33-46 on E-Reserve
  4. Robert Boice, "Quick Starters: New Faculty Who Succeed," New Directions for Teaching and Learning, No.48 (Winter 1991), pp. 111-121 on E-Reserve
  5. Pat Hutchings, "Defining Features and Significant Functions of the Course Portfolio" in Pat Hutchings, ed., The Course Portfolio: How Faculty Can Examine Their Teaching to Advance Practice and Improve Student Learning (Washington, D.C.: American Association for Higher Education, 1998), pp.13-18 in "Teaching College History Reader"
  6. William W. Cutler, III, "Writing a Course Portfolio for an Introductory Survey in American History" in ibid., pp.19-24 on E-Reserve

Essay 8—What is your "game plan" for your career as a teacher? How do you plan to present yourself on the job market and how would you like to shape your ADD MORE ON WHAT THIS MEANS—LOOKING AT JOB LISTINGS, ETC