Maximize Parking

Stuart Ball Betty Taylor Brenda Weddell

Class: Geometry

Materials: graph paper, measuring tools, straightedge

Goals: Develop measurement skills, interpret scale drawings, apply area and perimeter calculations, develop problem-solving skills and the ability to interact in a group.

Time: Three to five days--Present the problem on the first day. Allow two to three days for measurement and group collaborations. Present solutions on the final day.

Background: area and perimeter

Technology Required: calculator

Problem:

A new store has just been completed and the parking lot paved (see diagram on student pages). The object is to design the parking layout so as to maximize the number of parking spaces available. The following conditions must be included in your calculations:

1. You must reserve 5% of the parking spaces for the handicapped.

2. Each handicapped space must be 150% of the width used for the other spaces.

3. The maximum turning radius for all vehicles is 40 feet and must be allowed for in your calculations.

4. No parking is allowed on the street or in the alley, which is reserved for the loading dock.

5. You must decide where to place the two entrances. They may both be on the same street or one on each of two streets, but Church Street may not be used for an entrance, nor may an entrance be located on the alley.

6. You must allow for a fire lane in front of any side that contains a sidewalk. This lane must be 20 feet wide.

7. The black line along three sides of the building represents a 5 foot wide sidewalk.

Solution: Your solution should include the following:

1. An accurate scale drawing showing the placement of all parking spaces with the handicapped spaces designated.

2. Designated traffic flow patterns by use of arrows on your diagram.


3. A written report stating any assumptions you used, measurements you made, and the total number of parking spaces you were able to include in your diagram.

Extensions: As an extension project you could modify the problem to include any combination of the following:

1. Oval islands for trees or shrubs; an example of a shape could be a 15 foot long rectangle with semi-circular ends with radius 2.5 feet.

2. Light posts; determine the minimum needed for safety.

3. Cart return areas

4. An ATM drive-through or a Fast Foto Center


Maximize Parking

Problem:

A new store has just been completed and the parking lot paved (see diagram on next page). The object is to design the parking layout so as to maximize the number of parking spaces available. The following conditions must be included in your calculations:

1. You must reserve 5% of the parking spaces for the handicapped.

2. Each handicapped space must be 150% of the width used for the other spaces.

3. The maximum turning radius for all vehicles is 40 feet and must be allowed for in your calculations.

4. No parking is allowed on the street or in the alley, which is reserved for the loading dock.

5. You must decide where to place the two entrances. They may both be on the same street or one on each of two streets, but Church Street may not be used for an entrance, nor may an entrance be located on the alley.

6. You must allow for a fire lane in front of any side that contains a sidewalk (indicated by the black lines). This lane must be 20 feet wide.

7. The black line along three sides of the building represents a 5 foot wide sidewalk.

Solution: Your solution should include the following:

1. An accurate scale drawing showing the placement of all parking spaces with the handicapped spaces designated.

2. Designated traffic flow patterns by use of arrows on your diagram.

3. A written report stating any assumptions you used, measurements you made, and the total number of parking spaces you were able to include in your diagram.


0x01 graphic

(measurements are in feet)

Funded in part by the National Science Foundation and Indiana University 1995